The Slaveholder Abroad: Or, Billy Buck's Visit, with His Master, to England. A Series of Letters from Dr. Pleasant Jones [pseud.] to Major Joseph Jones, of Georgia

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1860 - 500 páginas
 

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Página 22 - We will not dwell on the ordinary topics — on the progress of civilization ; on the advance of freedom everywhere ; on the rights and requirements of the nineteenth century ; — but we appeal to you very seriously to reflect, and to ask counsel of God, how far such a state of things is in accordance with His holy word, the inalienable rights...
Página 490 - The most severe punishment required in the last forty years for a body of 500 negroes, at Hopeton, was for the theft of one negro from another. In that period there has been no criminal act of the highest grade, for which a delinquent could be committed to the penitentiary in Georgia, and there have been only six cases of assault and battery. As a race, the negroes are mild and forgiving, and by no means so prone to indulge in drinking as the white man or the Indian. There were more serious quarrels...
Página 445 - The avowed objects of the English laws which regulate the descent of property are, the concentration of wealth in the hands of a few, and the support of an hereditary territorial aristocracy. These ends have been obtained. The inequality in the distribution of wealth in England is greater than in any other civilized nation ; and her nobility and gentry are wealthier, more intelligent, more highly cultivated, more influential, and more secure in the possession of their power and property, than the...
Página 368 - Orleans — no matter about the colour of their skins, and then ask ourselves what should be our opinion of a nation in which such things are tolerated. They are of a sex and age the least qualified to struggle with the hardships of their lot — young women, for the most part, between sixteen and thirty years of age. As we would not deal in exaggerations, we would...
Página 22 - We acknowledge with grief and shame our heavy share in this great sin. We acknowledge that our forefathers introduced, nay, compelled the adoption of slavery in those mighty colonies. We humbly confess it before Almighty God; and it is because we so deeply feel, and so unfeignedly avow, our own complicity, that we now venture to implore your aid to wipe away our common crime, and our common dishonor.
Página 452 - They are deprived in childhood of all instruction and all enjoyment ; of the sports in which childhood instinctively indulges, of fresh air by day and of natural sleep by night. Their health, physical and moral, is alike destroyed ; they die of diseases induced by unremitting...
Página 388 - Too early employment — too long employment — too much fatigue — no time for relaxation — no time for mental improvement — no time for the care of health — exhaustion — intemperance — indifferent food — sickness — premature decay — a large mortality.' "The same gentleman, in speaking of the laboring poor of the agricultural districts, says that, in his opinion, their state is not more favorable to the preservation of perfect life of body than that of the manufacturing poor. He...
Página 452 - Their health physical and moral is alike destroyed ; they die of diseases induced by unremitting task work, by confinement in the impure atmosphere of crowded rooms, by the particles of metallic or vegetable dust which they are continually inhaling; or they live to grow up without decency, without comfort, and without hope, without morals, without religion, and without shame, and bring forth slaves like themselves to tread in the same path of misery.
Página 22 - ... seriously to reflect and to ask counsel of God how far such a state of things is in accordance with His Holy Word, the inalienable rights of immortal souls, and the pure and merciful spirit of the Christian religion. We do not shut our eyes to the difficulties, nay, the dangers, that might beset the immediate abolition of that long-established system. We see and admit the necessity of preparation for so great an event...
Página 457 - ... housekeepers, and gardeners of the kindest master in the world, in spite of ample legacies in his will, are rotting on parish pay, why the best house in the street is falling to decay, its windows all broken, and its very doors disappearing, why such a one drowned himself, and another is disgraced — you are just as likely as not to hear that a Chancery suit is at the bottom of it. There is no word so terrible to an Englishman as this. An honest, industrious man...

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