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In witness whereof I have hereunto set_my hand and caused the seal of

the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington,

this 2d day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight [l. s.] hundred and fifty five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the seventy-ninth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE. BY THE PRESIDENT:

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

No. 4. Respecting an apprehended Invasion of Nicaragua.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Dec. 8, 1855.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas information has been received by me that sundry persons, citizens of the United States and others, residents therein, are preparing, within the jurisdiction of the same, to enlist, or enter themselves, or to hire or retain others to participate in military operations within the State of Nicaragua :

Now, therefore, I, FRANKLIN PIERCE, President of the United States, do warn all persons against connecting themselves with any such enterprise or undertaking, as being contrary to their duty as good citizens and to the laws of their country, and threatening to the peace of the United States.

I do further admonish all persons who may depart from the United States, either singly or in numbers, organized or unorganized, for any such purpose, that they will thereby cease to be entitled to the protection of this government.

I exhort all good citizens to discountenance and prevent any such disreputable and criminal undertaking as aforesaid, charging all officers, civil and military, having lawful power in the premises, to exercise the same for the purpose of maintaining the authority and enforcing the laws of the United States.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed to these presents.

Done at the city of Washington, the eighth day of December, one thou[L. S.]

sand eight hundred and fifty-five, and of the Independence of the
United States the eightieth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.

BY THE PRESIDENT :

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

No. 5. Newfoundland to have Benefits of Reciprocity Treaty.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Dec. 12, 1855.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, by the second section of an act of the Congress of the United 1854, ch. 269. States approved the fifth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fiftyfour, entitled " An act to carry into effect a treaty between the United States and Great Britain, signed on the fifth day of June, eighteen hundred and fiftyfour,” it is provided that whenever the island of Newfoundland shall give its consent to the application of the stipulations and provisions of the said treaty to that province, and the legislature thereof, and the Imperial Parliament shall pass the necessary laws for that purpose, grain, flour, and breadstuffs of all kinds; animals of all kinds; fresh, smoked, and salted meats; cotton wool; seeds and vegetables; undried fruits; dried fruits; fish of all kinds; products of fish, and all other creatures living in the water; poultry; eggs; hides, furs, skins, or tails undressed; stone or marble in its crude or unwrought state ; slate; butter, cheese, tallow, lard; horns; manures; ores of metals of all kinds; coal; pitch, tar, turpentine; ashes; timber and lumber of all kinds, round, hewed and sawed, unmanufactured in whole or in part; fire wood, plants, shrubs, and trees; pelts; wool; fish oil; rice; broom corn and bark; gypsum, ground or unground; hewn

or wrought or unwrought burr or grindstones; dye-stuffs; flax, hemp, and tow, unmanufactured; unmanufactured tobacco; and rags—shall be admitted free of duty from that province into the United States, from and after the date of a proclamation by the President of the United States, declaring that he has satisfactory evidence that the said province has consented, in a due and proper manner, to have the provisions of the treaty extended to it, and to allow the United States the full benefits of all the stipulations therein contained :

And whereas I have satisfactory evidence that the province of Newfoundland has consented, in a due and proper manner, to have the provisions of the aforesaid treaty extended to it, and to allow the United States the full benefits of all the stipulations therein contained, so far as they are applicable to that province:

Now, therefore, I, FRANKLIN PIERCE, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that, from this date, the articles enumerated in the preamble of this proclamation, being the growth and produce of the British North American colonies, shall be admitted from the aforesaid province of Newfoundland into the United States free of duty, so long as the aforesaid treaty shall remain in force.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed to these presents.

Done at the city of Washington, the twelfth day of December, in the year [L. S.]

of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, and of the Independence of the United States the eightieth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.

BY THE PRESIDENT:

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

No. 6. Respecting Disturbances in Kansas Territory.

Feb. 11, 1856. BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS indications exist that public tranquillity and the supremacy of law in the Territory of Kansas, are endangered by the reprehensible acts or pur poses of persons, both within and without the same, who propose to direct and control its political organization by force: It appearing that combinations have been formed therein to resist the execution of the Territorial laws, and thus, in effect, subvert by violence all present constitutional and legal authority: It also appearing that persons residing without the Territory, but near its borders, contemplate armed intervention in the affairs thereof: It also appearing that other persons, inhabitants of remote states, are collecting money, engaging men, and providing arms for the same purpose: And it further appearing that combinations within the Territory are endeavoring, by the agency of emissaries and otherwise, to induce individual States of the Union to intervene in the affairs thereof, in violation of the Constitution of the United States :

And whereas all such plans for the determination of the future institutions of the Territory, if carried into action from within the same, will constitute the fact of insurrection, and if from without, that of invasive aggression, and will, in either case, justify and require the forcible interposition of the whole power of the General Government, as well to maintain the laws of the Territory as those of the Union :

Now, therefore, I, FRANKLIN PIERCE, President of the United States, do issue this my proclamation to command all persons engaged in unlawful combinations against the constituted authority of the Territory of Kansas or of the United States, to disperse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes; and to warn all such persons that any attempted insurrection in said Territory, or aggressive intrusion into the same, will be resisted not only by the employment of the local militia, but also by that of any available forces of the United States; to the end of assuring immunity from violence and full protection to the persons, property, and civil rights of all peaceful and law-abiding inhabitants of the Territory .

If, in any part of the Union, the fury of faction or fanaticism, inflamed into disregard of the great principles of popular sovereignty, which, under the Constitution, are fundamental in the whole structure of our institutions, is to bring on the country the dire calamity of an arbitrament of arms in that Territory, it

shall be between lawless violence on the one side, and conservative force on the other, wielded by legal authority of the General Government.

I call on the citizens, both of adjoining and of distant States, to abstain from unauthorized intermeddling in the local concerns of the Territory, admonishing them that its organic law is to be executed with impartial justice; that all individual acts of illegal interference will incur condign punishment; and that any endeavor to intervene by organized force will be firmly withstood.

Í invoke all good citizens to promote order by rendering obedience to the law; to seek remedy for temporary evils by peaceful means; to discountenance and repulse the counsels and the instigations of agitators and of disorganizers; and to testify their attachment to their country, their pride in its greatness, their appreciation of the blessings they enjoy, and their determination that republican institutions shall not fail in their hands, by co-operating to uphold the majesty of the laws and to vindicate the sanctity of the Constitution.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed to these presents.

Done at the city of Washington, the eleventh day of February, in the year
[L.s.]

of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, and of the In-
dependence of the United States the eightieth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.
BY THE PRESIDENT:

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

No. 7. Respecting Boundary with Mexico.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. June 2, 1856

A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS pursuant to the first article of the treaty between the United Vol. x. p. 1032. States and the Mexican Republic, of the thirtieth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three, the true limits between the territories of the contracting parties were declared to be as follows:

“ Retaining the same dividing line between the two Californias as already defined and established, according to the fifth article of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the limits between the two republics shall be as follows:

“ Beginning in the Gulf of Mexico, three leagues from land, opposite the mouth of the Rio Grande, as provided in the fifth article of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo; thence, as defined in the said article, up the middle of that river to the point where the parallel of 31° 47' north latitude crosses the same; thence due west one hundred miles; thence south to the parallel of 31° 20' north latitude; thence along the said parallel of 31° 20' to the 111th meridian of longitude west of Greenwich; thence in a straight line to a point on the Colorado River twenty English miles below the junction of the Gila and Colorado rivers; thence up the middle of the said River Colorado until it intersects the present line between the United States and Mexico: '

And whereas, the said dividing line has been surveyed, marked out, and established, by the respective commissioners of the contracting parties, pursuant to the same article of the said treaty:

Now, therefore, be it known, that I, FRANKLIN PIERCE, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare to all whom it may concern, that the line aforesaid shall be held and considered as the boundary between the United States and the Mexican Republic, and shall be respected as such by the United States and the citizens thereof.

In testimony whereof, I have caused the seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed.

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this second day of June, (L. S.]

in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six,
and of the Independence of the United States the eightieth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE. BY TIIE PRESIDENT:

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

No. 8. Calling an Extra Session of Congress. August 18, 1856. BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, whilst hostilities exist with various Indian tribes on the remote frontiers of the United States, and whilst in other respects the public peace is seriously threatened, Congress has adjourned without granting necessary supplies for the army, depriving the Executive of the power to perform his duty in relation to the common defence and security, and an extraordinary occasion bas thus arisen for assembling the two Houses of Congress, I do, therefore, by this my proclamation, convene the said Houses to meet at the Capitol, in the city of Washington, on Thursday, the 21st day of August, instant, hereby requiring the respective Senators and Representatives then and there to assemble, to consult and determine on such measures as the state of the Union may seem to require.

In testimony whereof, I have caused the seal of the United States to be [SEAL.]

hereunto affixed, and signed the same with my hand. Done at the city of Washington, the eighteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-first.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.

BY ORDER:

W. L. MARCY, Secretary of State.

INDEX

TO THE

FOREGOING PUBLIC LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES.

A.

49

49

29

Academy, Military. See Military Academy.

Naval. "See Naval Academy. Acapulco, salary of consul at,..

54 Accounts.

of marshals, district attorneys, clerks of

courts and commissioners to be certi-
fied by the judge...

appeal from accounting officer,.
Adjutant-General,
appropriation for office of,..

111 Agents, Commercial. See Commercial Agents.

Consular. See Consular Agents.

Indian. See Indian Agents. Agricultural Statistics,

appropriation for collection of,. ...... 14, 89 Air la Chapelle, salary of consul at,. .

53 Alabama, grant of land to for construction of railroads,

... 15, 16, 17 Albany, The,

time when she is to be reckoned as being
lost fixed,...

29 payment to relatives of those lost in,.... Albury, (Vt.)

privilege of reëxportation extended to.

Appendix, No. 3. Alexandria, (Egypt,) salary of consul-general at,..

53 Almanac, American Nautical, appropriation for,....

48 American Nautical Almanac, appropriation for,

48 Amoor River, (Russia,)

salary of commercial agent at.... ........ 55 Amoy, salary of consul at,...

53 Amsterdam, salary of consul at,..

53 Annals of Congress, appropriation for purchase of,.

11 Antwerp, salary of consul at,..

53 Apaches, appropriations for the,

66 Apia, salary of consul at, .

54 Appeal,

from decisions of first comptroller when
he was auditor, mode of,...

142 from decision on accounts of marshals,

district attorneys, clerks of courts, and
commissioners,..

49 VOL. XI. PUB.—20

Appropriations,

for Indian affairs, the army, navy, light

houses, custom-houses, court-houses,
post-offices, military academy, fortifica-
tions, post-office department, harbors
and rivers, deficiencies, roads, pensions,

ocean steamers. See those titles.
general, civil, and diplomatic appropria-
tion bill for 1856-57,..

102 legislative,..

102, 103, 104 senate,

102, 103 house,

103, 104 library,

104, 105 superintendent of printing,.

105 paper and printing,... 105, 142 executive,

105 state department,

105, 106 salaries,

105 publishing laws,

105 pay of the clerks in,.

118 extra clerks,

105 messenger to Texas,.

105 Howard's Reports,..

105 Dip. Correspondence,..... 105, 106 consul at St. Thomas,..

106 Dr. Kohl's maps,..

106 N. E. Exec. Building,

106 miscellaneous,..

105, 106 treasury department,. 106, 107, 108 secretary's office,

106, 107 the comptrollers' offices,.. 106, 107 the auditors' offices, . . 106, 107, 108 treasurer's office,

107, 108 register's office,

107, 108 solicitor's office,

107, 108 commissioner of customs,. 107, 108 light-house board.... 107, 108 S. E. Exec. building,.

10s additional clerks in,

118 Dep. of the Interior, . 108, 109, 110 secretary's office,..

108, 109 general land-office, 108, 109 Indian affairs office,..

107 pension office,

109, 110 office of public buildings,. 109, 110 patent-office building,..

110 exploring expedition,..

110 surveyors -general,.. 110, 116 additional clerks in,..

118 war department,...

111 secretary's office,

111 additional clerks in,.

118 adjutant-general's office,..

111 quartermaster-general's office,.. 111

temporary clerks in,.... 118 paymaster-general's office...... 111 surgeon-general's office,.....

111

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