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western bound ıry of the State of Missouri, and re-surveyed the same due west to the intersection with the guide meridian, east of the 6th principal meridian, 75 miles and 8 90:100 chains, and surveyed the northern boundary of the Cherokee neutral lands, starting from the northeast corner of the Osage lands, due east to the intersection of the Missouri State line, four miles south of the fifth standard parallel south, the length of the line being 24 miles and 74 61:100 chains, south of the 92d mile of the western boundary of the State of Missouri Deputy Van Zandt, in his field notes of the survey, states that Mr. Aikin, the Osage interpreter, who was with Major Langham, the original surveyor, when he started his random line east from White Hair Village, situated on the right bank of the Neosho River, pointed out the site of the old White Hair Village, the point at which Major Langham started his line. “After identifying the village mentioned in the treaty of June 2d, 1825, Mr. Van Zandt established the northeast corner of the Osage reservation, it being by actual measurement, ten miles north of White Hair Village, from a point due east, and 25 miles west from the western boundary line of the State of Missouri. The correctness of the admeasurement was proved by finding on the north boundary of the Osage lands a white oak, eighteen inches in diameter, marked on the east and west sides with a blaze, and two chops in each blaze, noted by McCoy” in 1836; this tree being seven links south of Van Zandt's random line west from the northeast corner of the Osage lands, and at the distance of 9 miles 53 82:100 chains from the same, Mr. Van Zandt being entirely satisfied of the correctness of his survey, as to the northern boundary line, offsetted south his random line west to the extent of the aforesaid seven links, and assuming the tree nine miles and 10 chains west from the northeast corner, per McCoy's survey of 1836, and the original survey by Major Langham having been identified by many mounds existing in 1836, Mr. Van Zandt continued his due west course to the intersection of the guide meridian east of the 6th principal meridian. From the foregoing it appears that the northern boundary of the Osage reservation, under the second article of the treaty of June 2d, 1825, was properly established—that its distance from the 40° of north latitude, as the ci muon boundary line between Kansas and Nebraska, which is a's, the principal base for the survey of the public lands therein, astronomically established in 1851, by Captain T. J. Lee, TopoGraphical Engineur Vi. S. A., is 154 miles, which taken from 207 miles, the product of three degrees of the meridian, from the 37° to 40°, north latitude, would leave 53 miles as the distance from the northern boundaries of the reservation, as now marked in the field, to the southern boundary of the State of Kansas, affording sufficient extent for the breadth of 50 miles, for the Osage lauds, as provided in the treaty. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, &c., (Signed.)

J. V. EDMUNDS, Com’r.

STATE OF KANSAS, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

TOPEKA, September 15th, 1865. DEAR SIR: Sometime ago I referred the question as to the boundary lines of the Osage and Cherokee reservations to the Secretary of the Interior, at Washington, which was by him referred to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and he reported adverse to our claims, taking the survey and report of Deputy Surveyor Geo. C. Van Zandt, as his basis, and ignoring previous surveys. The only way we can settle the question definitely is. to ascertain the exact locality of the “old White Hair Village,” its distance from the western boundary line of the State of Missouri, and the 37° or southern boundary of Kansas. Also the location of the subsequent villages laid out and called by the same name of White Hair Village. If you will, at your earliest couvenience, go down and ascertain these facts, together with the names and location of parties now living, who know them to be true, and report them to me, (in person it possible,) I shall be able to have a new survey made and the boundaries of these reserrations properly established I am satisfied that a great fraud has been committed, and think we should use every effort to have it corrected. Answer.

Yours truly. (Signed.) S. J. CRAWFORD. Governor of Kas To G. J. ENDICOTT.

To llis Eccellency, Governor S. J. Crawford:

Sir: In accordance with your instructions, I proceeded to ascertain the bounds of the Osage and Cherokee neutral lands, and have the honor to report that during the month of November, 1865, I proceeded, in company with John A. Cramer, W'm. Howard, Jacob Youstler, John Q. Adams and George W. James, to ascertain, by actual survey and admeasurement, the exact boundary line of the Osage Indian reservation, and the Cherokee neutral lands; also the Seneca. Quapaw and Shawnee reservations.

The first and most important question for us to determine, was the exact location of the original "old White Hair Village,” the place designated in the Osage treaty of June 20, 1825, as the starting point for the described boundary of their reservation, and from which the boundary line of the Cherokee neutral lands is established.

Starting at a point on the western boundary line of the State of Missouri, 130 miles south from the Missouri river, and 41 miles north from the southwest corner of the State of Missouri, thence running on a due west line for twenty-seven miles, to the original “old White Hair Village,” which is situated on the right, or west, bank of the Neosho river.

From the old White Hair Village” to the 37th of north latitude (the southern line of the State of Kansas) is eleven and a half miles but to the present survey of said line, only four and a half miles.

At this village I found three mounds of stone, and a large mound of earth with stone in the center, which, I am satisfied, was the original starting point for the boundary line of the Osage reserration.

The southeast corner of the Osage lands is the same as the southwest of the Cherokee neutral lands, which is found by starting at the imuthwest corner of the State of Missouri, thence north, on 'said line of Missouri, one and a half miles, to lIoney creek-first running water-(original southeast corner of the Seneca land-. ) thence west to a large mound of earth, originally seven feet square and six and a half feet high, with a rock in it, on which is inscribe! Cherokee lands, west of which mound (about forty chains,) is a miss of rock. Runving from said mound of earth twenty-five miles east to a rock and three post oak trees, thence north fifty miles, to a mound of earth, originally six feet square and five and a half feet high, thence west twenty-five miles, to the northeast orner of the Osage lands, which is a mound of earth six feet quare and five feet high. No timber in the cirinily.

And I further state that the Cherokee Neutral Land, now emtrace within their limits all the Seneca, Quapaw and Shawnee reserrations.

I also superintended the running of the line from George White Hair Village to the west line of the State of Missouri, 52 miles, il chains and 29 links, striking said line of Missouri 19 chains an130 links south of mile stone 111 from the Missouri river. From a number of the oldest Indians in the Nation, including a stand-son of the “Old White Hair," and a son of George White Hair, who laid out and located the present White Hair Village, which stands on the west bank of the Neosho River, about 33 miles west of the State line of Missouri, and' from the house of George White Hair to the State line of Missouri, 32 miles, 71 bains and 29 links, and about 29 miles north of the original Old White Hair Village.” It was from the village laid out by George White Hair, a son of the original White Hair, that Dep-, ety Surveyor General George C. Van Zant is supposed to have started his line when he surveyed these lands in 1859. (Signed)

G. J. ENDICOTT.

Immigration. This subject should receive due and careful consideration at júur hands. No State in the Union offers greater inducements to immigrants than Kansas. It contains as many square miles as England, Scotland and Wales combined, with their population of about 30,000,000. or as Greece, Belgium, Holland, Denmark and

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STATE OF KANSAS, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

TOPEKA, September 15th, 1865. DEAR SIR: Sometime ago I referred the question as to the boundary lines of the Osage and Cherokee reservations to the Secretary of the Interior, at Washington, which was by him referred to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and he reported adverse to our claims, taking the survey and report of Deputy Surveyor Geo. C. Van Zandt, as his basis, and ignoring previous surveys. The only way we can settle the question definitely is, to ascertain the exact locality of the sold White Hair Village,” its distance from the western boundary line of the State of Missouri, and the 37° or southern boundary of Kansas. Also the location of the subsequent villages laid out and called by the same name of White Hair Village. If you will, at your earliest couvenience, go down and ascertain these facts, together with the names and location of parties now living, who know them to be tru and report them to me, (in person if possible,) I shall be able to have a new survey made and the boundaries of these reservations properly established I am satisfied that a great fraud has been committed, and think we should use every effort to have it corrected. Answer.

Yours truly. (Signed.) S. J. CRAWFORD). Governs of Kas. To G. J. ENDICOTT.

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Tollis Excellency, Governor S. J. Crawford:

Sir: In accordance with your instructions, I proceeded to ascertain the bounds of the Osage and Cherokee neutral lands, and have the honor to report that during the month of November, 1865, I proceedled, in company with John A. Cramer. Wm. Howard, Jacob Youstler, John Q. Adams and George W. James, to ascertain, by actual survey and admeasurement, the exact boundary line of the Osage Indian reservation, and the Cherokee neutral lands; also the Seneca, Quapaw and Shawnee reservations.

The first and most important question for us to determine, was the exact location of the original-old White Hair Village,” the place designated in the Osage treaty of June 2d, 1825, as the starting point for the described boundary of their reservation, and from which the boundary line of the Cherokee neutral lands is established.

Starting at a point on the western boundary line of the State of Missouri, 136] miles south from the Missouri river, and 41} miles north from the southwest corner of the State of Missouri, thence running on a due west line for twenty-seven miles, to the original “old White Hair Village,” which is situated on the right, or west, bank of the Neosho river.

From the old White Hair Village” to the 37tho of north latitude (the southern line of the State of Kansas) is eleren and a half

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miles but to the present survey of said line, only four and a half miles.

At this village I found three mounds of stone, and a large mound of earth with stone in the center, which, I am satisfied, was the original starting point for the boundary line of the Osage reservation.

The southeast corner of the Osage lands is the same as the southwest of the Cherokce neutral lands, which is found by starting at the southwest corner of the State of Missouri, thence north, on said line of Missouri, one and a half miles, to Honey creek-first running water-(original southeast corner of the Seneca lands.) thence west to a large mound of earth, originally seven feet square and sis and a half feet high, with a rock in it, on which is inscribed Cherokee lands, west of which mound (about forty chains,) is a mass of rock. Runding from said mound of earth twenty-five miles east to a rock and three post oak trees, thence north fifty miles, to a mound of earth, originally six feet square and five and a half feet high, thence west twenty-five miles, to the northeast corner of the Osage lands, which is a moud of earth six feet square and five feet high. No timber in the vicinity.

And I further state that the Cherokee Neutral Land, now embrace within their limits all the Seneca, Quapaw and Shawnee reservations.

I also superintended the running of the line from George White Hair Village to the west line of the State of Missouri, 52 miles, 71 chains and 29 links, striking said line of Missouri 19 chains and 50 links south of mile stone 111 from the Missouri river. From a number of the oldest Indians in the Nation, including a grand-son of the “Old White Hair,” and a son of George White Hair, who laid out and located the present White Hair Village, which stands on the west bank of the Neosho River, about 33 miles west of the State line of Missouri, and' from the house of George White Hair to the State line of Missouri, 32 miles, 71 chains and 29 links, and about 29 miles north of the original sOld White Hair Village.” It was from the village laid out by George White Hair, a son of the original White Hair, that Deputy Surveyor General George C. Van Zant is supposed to have started his line when he surveyed these lands in 1859. (Signed)

G. J. ENDICOTT.

Immigration. This subject should receive due and careful consideration at your hands. No State in the Union offers greater inducements to immigrants than Kansas. It contains as many square miles as England, Scotland and Wales combined, with their population of about 30,000,000, or as Greece, Belgium, Holland, Deomark and

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