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assigned,) until it was mustered out. The drafted men unwarrantably imprisoned and badly treated by United States officers, after reporting at the draft rendezvous at Fort Leaven. worth, for duty.

The large amount of money expended by citizens, communities and corporations to secure enlistments, (under the call for which the draft was ordered,) should, in justice, all be refunded by the General Government; as the State at that time was several thousand in excess of all calls. And our soldiers who enlisted in the beginning of the war should receive additional bounty, not only to an equal amount with those, who long afterwards enlisted, but proportionately greater, as their term of service was longer.

The pensions allowed by the Government being inadequate to meet the wants of our brave, but now disabled, defenders, I therefore recommend that you memoralize Congress for an appropriation of land as a basis upon which the State may appropriate suitable pensions to her soldiers, in proportion to the disability contracted in the service. Instead of the faithful soldiers being allowed to suffer, or become subjects of public charity, the State should feel it her highest duty to make honorable and ample provisions for them. These men, by their sacrifices, defended, protected and saved the Country, and the Government now should and must, be their protector and benefactor. Immediate provision should be made by the State for those wounded and disabled, and for the families of those killed in the militia service of the State.

TO

REPORT (NOT COMPLETE) OF THE BOARD OF COUMISSIONERS

AUDIT CLAIMS ARISING OUT OF PRICE RAID IN I861."

Services Rendcred.

PRICE RAID

INDIAN EXPX.

Am’t due " organized militia,"

as per pay and muster rolls, now on file.

$146.753.03 $12.098.95 Am’t due “ irregular militia,"

as per pay and muster rolls, now on file.

10.535.00

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The Quartermaster and Paymaster General's reports are herewith transmitted ; also, report of Attorney General.

Extinction of Indian Titles. The numerous Indian reservations, embraced within our limits, are detrimental to the interests of the State. The Indians will neither improve nor cultivate the lands, and their occupancy prevents others from doing it. i recommend that you memoralize Congress for the removal of the various tribes from this State to the Indian Territory, and that patents be issued to those having selected homes, thereby enabling them to dispose of their lands, if they so desire, and remove with the others; and if not, that their land may become subject to taxation, as that of other settlers.

By an examination of the treaties made with the various Indian tribes on the southern border, and from recent surveys made by my order, in my opinion, the Osage tribe of Indians now possesses and occupies about four million acres of land in Kansas, to which they are not entitled by treaty stipulations; which, in addition to the three million acres recently treated for, will remove them south of the thirty-seventh degree, north latitude, the southern boundary of this State. The Cherokee tribe is now holding the land between 36° 30' and 37° 20' (most of which is the proper territory for the Osage reservation,) in connection with their seven million acres south of 36° 30'. I herewith transmit maps of said reservation, and annex copies of correspondence with Hon. Janies Harlan, Secretary of Interior, and others, and recommend such action as in your judgment may be deemed best.

CORRESPONDENCE.

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STATE OF KANSAS,

E.creutive Office, Topeka, Aug. 3d, 1865. HON.JAMES HARLAN, Sery of Interior.

SIR :-- After a full and careful examination of all treaties made with the Osage, Cherokee, Seneca and Quapaw Indians, and from my own personal knowledge of their respective reservations, I am fully convinced that the Great and Little Osage Indian tribes now claim, hold and occupy a large tract of land in Southern Kansas, tv which they have neither right, title or clain. By treaty of June 2d, 1895, the Great and Little Osage Indian tribes ceded to the United States, all their lands west of the Mississippi River, except the following described tract, to wit: Beginning at a point due east of - White Ilair Village,” and twenty-lire miles west of the western boundary line of the State of Missouri, fronting on a north and south line, so as to leave ten miles north and forty miles south of the point of said beginning, and extending west with the width of fifty miles, to a line drawn from the head sources of the Kansas River, southerly through the Rock Saline. "White Hair Village," the starting point of the Osage boundary, is situated about ten miles north of the thirty-seventh degree, which is the southern boundary line of the State of Kansas, and thirty miles west of the western boundary line of the State of Missouri

. According to the above statement, which is in accordance with the Osage treaty of June 2d, 1825, the north line of the Osage reserration should run about twenty miles north and parallel with the thirty-seventh degree, while at present they claim their entire reservation north of the thirty-seventh degree, and within the State of Kapsas. The same is true as regards the Cherokee neutral lands. They claim this entire tract within the State of Kansas, while by treaty of December 29th, 1835, the Government sold and conveyed to them eight hundred thousand acres of land situated between the west line of the State of Missouri and the Usage reservation---less the Quapaw lands—and extending as far north as the Osage lands. Hence the Cherokees and Osages are claiming and holding lands in Kansas to which they have no legal right or claim, and which should be thrown open for settlement. I therefore ask that the Commissioner of the General Land Office be instructed to investigate the whole affair, and that the Surveyor General of Kansas, or some other competent party, be directed to immediately make a new survey of the above mentioned reservation, and set apart to each tribe the exact amount of land to which it is entitled by treaty stipulations. All of which is respectfully submitted.

I am Your Honor's most obedient servant, (Signed.)

S. J. CRAWFORD,

Governor of Kansas.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

General Land Office, August 31st, 1865.) HON. JAMES HARLAN, Sesretary of the Interior.

Sie:- I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a copy of a letter from Governor S. J. Crawford of Kansas, relative to metes and bounds of the Great and Little Osages and Cherokee neutral lands in that State. referred by the Department to this office, on the 25th inst., with directions to examine the subject and to report the facts in the case.

In obedience to the instructions, I have to report as follows: The Governor of Kansas alleges that the above mentioned Osages and Cherokees are “claiming and holding land in Kansas, to which they have no legal right or claim, and which should be thrown open for settlement;" and requests that the Surveyor General be directed to make a new survey of the reservation, in accordance with the respective treaty stipulations.

In support of these premises, the Governor states that the White Hair Village, the starting point" for the Osage boundary, is situated about ten miles north "of the 37th degree, which is the southern boundary line of the State of Kansas, and thirty miles west of the western boundary line of Missouri.”

It is upon this erroneous hypothesis that the Governor's request is made for the re-survey of the boundaries, so that the northern lines of the Osage and Cherokee Neutral lands should run about twenty miles north of the 37tho of north latitude. The actual condition of these lines appears from official data on file in this office, to the following effect :

The White Hair Village, the beginning point referred to in the 2d Art., treaty, June 2d, 1825, with the Osage tribes : Statutes at large, vol. 7, page 210, is about 43 miles, and not 20 miles, north of the southern boundary of Kansas. It is 10 miles and 26 30-100 chains, and not 30 miles west of the western boundary of the State of Missouri, and the northern boundary of the Osage reservation, as well as that of the Cherokee neutral lands, is 10 miles north oi the White Hair Village. The latter was actually admeasured by Geo. C. Van Zandt, U. S. Deputy Surveyor in 1859. These evidences place the Indian Reservations within the State of Kansas; their width from north to south being 50 miles, according to the treaty.

From the surveying records on file in this office, it appears that the northern boundary of the Osage Reservation was originally surveyed from the northeast corner thereof, a random line having been first run from White Hair Village east, to the western boundary of the State of Missouri, 40 miles, intersecting it between the 1020 and 103d mile post of the boundary. This survey was made by R. P. Beauchamp, Ass't Surveyor, in May, 1827. Subsequently, from May 26th to September 16th, 1836, the northern boundary of the Osage reservation, was partly retraced from the northeast corner thereof, and extended west 124 miles, to the left bank of the Arkansas river, as the terminus of the survey of the north line of the Osage lands, by John C. McCoy, under orders of Gen. Wm. Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, at St. Louis, Mo. Finally, in closing the lines of the public survey in Kansas, upon the northern boundary of the Osage and Cherokee neutral lands, in 1859, it was found necessary to ascertain the lines and retrace them. Accordingly Deputy Surveyor Geo. C. Van Zandt was dispatched by the Surveyor General of Kansas and Nebraska, for that purpose, who, in the months of May, June and July of that year, re-established the north-east corner of the Osage reserva. ion, by actual admeasurement of the ten miles north from a point due east of White IIair Village, and twenty-five miles west of the

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