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AN ALPHABETICAL ACCOUNT, AND CHRONOLOGICAL LISTS, OF THEIR WORKS,

THE DATES WHEN PRINTED, AND OBSERVATIONS ON THEIR MERITS :

TOGETHER WITH

AN INTRODUCTORY VIEW OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS

OF THE

BRITISH STAGE.

ORIGINALLY COMPILED, TO THE YEAR 1764, By

DAVID ERSKINE BAKER.

CONTINUED THENCÉ TO 1982, BY

ISAAC REED, F.A. S.
And brought down to the End of November 1811, with very considerable

Additions and Improvements throughout, by

STEPHEN JONES.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. 1.-PART II.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, HURST, Rees, ORME, AND BROWN,
T. PAYNE, G, AND W. NICOL, NICHOLS AND SON, SCATCHERD
AND LETTERMAN, J. BARKER, W. MILLER, R. H. EVANS,
J. HARDING, J. FAULDER, AND GALE AND CURTIS.

1812.

LIBRARY

ME
UNIV. SITY

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MAIN

curess.

INC

INC INCABALD, Mrs. Elizabeth, tification, told that her relation had is the daughter of Mr. Simpson, retired from business, and was seta reputable farmer at Staningfield, tled in Wales.—Her alarm at these near Bury St. Edmund's, in Suf- unexpected tidings, and her evifolk, whó had a numerous family. dent distress (it being near ten Having lost her father during her o'clock at night), moved the cominfancy, she was under the care passion of the people of the house of her mother, who, on her be- where she inquired, who, at her coming a widow, continued to request, generously accommodated occupy the farm, and brought up her with a lodging. This civility, her children with all due atten- however, awakened suspicion : she tion, Miss Simpson had an im- had read in novels the various pediment in her speech, which modes of seduction which were prevented her from being much in practised in London, and apprecompany; for she was scarcely in- hended that she was in a dangerous tell gible to any one who was not house; this suspicion seemed conweil acquainted with her. During firmed by the entrance of a corher solitary hours, she applied her- pulent old lady, whose appearance self to books; and, anxious to be- exactly corresponded with the decome acquainted with the customs scription she had read of a pro-. and manners of the world, of which

While, therefore, they she had read so much, she formed were whispering their pity for her the resolution of visiting the me- youth, and extolling her beauty, cropolis; and, finding that her in- she suddenly snatched up her bandtention was contrary to the wishes box, and, without saying a word, of her friends, she seized an op- rushed out of the house, leaving portunity, early one morning in the people to stare at each other, February 1772, of eloping from and repent of their compassion. her family. She had previously Much fatigued and alarmed, she packed up a few necessaries in a knocked at a house, where she bandbox ; and, with these, ran saw a bill announcing “ lodgings about two miles across some fields, “ to belet,” pretending that she was and there waited with imparience a milliner's apprentice, whose misfor the stage, which conveye l her tress bad unexpectedly a number to London. At this time she was of visitors from the country that about 16 years of age, and re- occupied all her beds, and had markable for beauty of features, therefore desired her to seek a and elegance of fignre. Having temporary accommodation. The often heard her family speak of a veracity of her story was natudistant relation who lived opposite rally doubted; but she persisted Northumberland House, in the in her tale, till, on turning about, Strand, on her arrival in London to her great surprise and confusion, she took a hackney-coach, and she perceived the identical tradessought this asylum ; but, on reach- man, whose house she had so preing the place was, to hes great mor- cipitately left, listening attentively

VOL. 1.

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