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The howitzers must keep up a constant fire from the time they can reach with shrapnel until out of its range. 1). G. Farraoitt,

Itear-Admlml Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.
Flag-ship Hartford, Mobilb Bat, July 29.

General Order, No. 11:

Should any vessel he disabled to such a degree that her consort is unable to keep her in her station, she will drop out of line to the westward, and not embarrass the vessels next astern by attempting to regain her station. Should she repair damages so as to be able to reenter the line of battle, she will take her station in the rear as close to the last vessels as possible.

So soon as the vessels have passed the Fort and kept away N.W., they can cast off the gunboats at the discretion of the senior officer of the two vessels, and allow them to proceed up the bay to cut off the enemy's gunboats that may be attempting to escape up to Mobile. There are certain black buoys placed by the enemy from the piles on the west side of the channel across it toward Fort Morgan. It being understood that there are torpedoes and other obstructions between the buoys, the vessels will take care to pass to the eastward of the easternmost buoy, which is clear of all obstructions.

So soon as the vessels arrive opposite the end of the piles, it will be best to stop the propeller of the ship, and let her drift the distance past by her headway and the tide; and those having side-wheel gunboats will continue on by the aid of their paddle-wheels, which are not likely to foul with the enemy's drag ropes.

D. G. Farraoct,

Hear-AdmlraL U. S. Flag-ship Iiartford, Mobilk Bat, Aug. 6, 1S64. Geneual Order, No. 12:

The Admiral returns thanks to the officers and crews of the vessels of the fleet for their gallant conduct during the fight of yesterday.

It has never been his good fortune to see men do their duty with more courage and cheerfulness; for, although they knew that the enemy was prepared with all devilish means for our destruction, and though they witnessed the almost instantaneous annihilation of our gallant companions in the Tecumseh by a torpedo, and the slaughter of their friends, messmates, and gun-mates on our decks, still there were no evidences of hesitation in following their Commanderin-Chief through the line of torpedoes and obstructions, of which we knew nothing, except from the exaggerations of the enemy, who had given out: "That we should all be blown up as certainly as we attempted to enter."

For this noble and implicit confidence in their leader, he heartily thanks them.

I). G. Farraoct,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobilb Bat, Aug. 7, 1S6I.

General Okjiek, No. 13:

The Admiral desires the fleet to return thanks to Almighty God for the signal victory over the enemy on the morning of the fifth instant D. G. Farrac.ut, Bear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

LETTER FROM REAR-ADMIRAL FARRAOUT, TRANSMITTING ADDITIONAL REPORT OF CAPT. T. A.JENKINS. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bat, August 17, 1S64. Sir: I have the honor to forward herewith an additional report of Captain Jenkins, in connection with the engagement of the fifth instant, which was not received in time to accompany my detailed despatch No. 343.

Lieutenant Commander Gherardi's conduct is referred to in this report in high terms.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
D. G. Farragut,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

Hon. Gideon Welles,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

ADDITIONAL REPORT OF CAPTAIN T. A. JENKINS.

U. S. STRAMSnip Richmond, Insidr Of Mobili Bat, 1
August 5, 1664. f

Sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your General Order and plan of battle for attacking Fort Morgan and the rebel fleet, Lieutenant Commander Bancroft Gherardi, commanding the U. S. steamer Port Koyal, reported himself with his vessel to me, ready for action a little before daylight this morning.

The Port Royal was lashed on the port-side of this vessel, with her stern pivot-gun sufficiently far aft of the quarter of this ship to enable it to be used against the enemy as effectively as one of my own broadside guns.

To Lieutenant Commander Gherardi I am greatly indebted for his cool and courageous conduct, from the moment the attack commenced to the time that his vessel was cast off by my order to go in chase of the enemy's three wooden gunboats, the Morgan, Gaines, and Selma.

My orders on board of this ship to the helmsman, and to the officer stationed at the enginebell, were repeated by him on board of his own vessel, and the soundings passed from his vessel to this with a coolness and clearness of voice that could not but excite my admiration.

The after pivot-gun of the Port Royal (the only one that could be brought to bear upon the enemy's batteries from that vessel) was worked most effectively.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Thornton A. Jenkins,

Captain.

Rear-Admiral D. G. Farraoct,

Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Inside of Mobile Bay.

LETTER FROM REAR-ADMIRAL FARRAOUT, TRANSMIT-
TING REPORT OF SURVElf ON THE REBEL RAM TEN-
NESSEE.

Flag-ship Hartford, West Gulf Blockading I
Squadron, August 16, 1SW. f

Sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that on the sixth instant I ordered a survey to be made of the hull, armor, etc., of the iron-clad Tennessee, and I herewith submit the report, (order of survey and report marked Nos. 1 and 2,) as well as a sectional view of the vessel made by Second Assistant-Engineer J. Do Graff, of this ship, and a drawing in water-colors by

Second Assistant-Engineer Robert Weir, of the
Richmond.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
D. G. Farragut,

Rear-Admlral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

Hon. Gideon Welles,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. REPORT OF SURVEY ON THE REBEL RAM TENNESSEE. Flaq-ship Hartford, Mobilk Bat, August 6,1S64.

Gentlemen: You will please make a strict and careful survey on the rebel iron-clad steamer Tennessee, captured in the engagement of yesterday, describing her hull, armor, machinery, armament, ammunition, the injuries to the vessel by shot, and those received when struck by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford.

You will also state the repairs necessary to be made to put her again in serviceable condition, and the general internal arrangement of the vessel for light and ventilation, reporting to me in duplicate. Very respectfully,

D. G. Farragut,

Rear-Admlral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

Captain T. A. Jenkins.
Captain James Alden.
Commander W. E. Le Roy
Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson.

U. S Strah-sloop Richxosd, IssrnR np Mobile Bat, I
August 18,1864. )

Sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, hereto appended, we have the honor respectfully to report that we have made a strict and careful survey of the iron-clad cascmated steamer Tennessee, captured from the rebels in the engagement in this bay, on the morning of the fifth instant, by the fleet under your command, and submit as follows, namely:

DESCRIPTION OF TENNESSEE'S HULL.

The hull of the vessel appears to be exceedingly strongly built in every part, the material being oak and yellow pine, with iron fastenings. Length from stem to stern on deck, two hundred and nine feet Greatest breadth of beam on deck, forty-eight feet. Mean average draught of water, about fourteen feet

The deck is covered fore and aft with wroughtiron plates two inches thick.

The sides of the vessel are protected by an overhang, sponsoncd, and covered with two layers of two inch wrought-iron.

This overhang extends about six feet below the water-line.

The sides of the vessel below the deck are believed to be eight feet thick, and the distance from the knuckle, or outside of the overhang on deck, to the base of the casemate on cither side is ten feet

The vessel is provided with a strong beak or prow, which projects about two feet under water, formed by the continuation of the sponsoning, and covered with wrought-iron plates.

The casemate of the vessel is very strongly built. It is seventy-eight feet, eight inches long,

and twenty-eight feet nine inches wide inside— the sides of the vessel extending ten feet from it on either side, at the greatest breadth of beam.

The framing consists of heavy yellow pine beams, thirteen inches thick, and placed close together vertically. Outside planking of yellow pine, five and a half inches thick, laid on horizontally, and outside of this horizontal planking there is a layer of oak timber four inches thick, bolted on vertically, upon which the iron plating is secured.

The plating or armor of the casemate forward is six inches thick, consisting of three two-inch iron plates, of about six inches wide each, and abaft and on the sides five inches thick, consisting of two two-inch and one one-inch iron-plates of the same width.

The yellow pine framing of the casemate is planked over inside with two and a half inch oak timber laid on diagonally.

The whole of the armor plating is fastened with through-bolts, one and a quarter inch diameter, with washers and nuts inside.

The casemate is covered on top with wroughtiron gratings, composed of bars two inches thick, and six inches wide, laid flat, and supported on wooden beams twelve inches square, and about five feet distant from each other. Some of these gratings are hinged and fitted to open from the inside.

There are ten gun-ports in the casemate — two in broadside, on either side, three forward and three aft

The forward and after ports, to port and starboard, are placed so as to enable the forward and after pivot-guns to be used as broadside guns. The directly forward and after ports are on a line with the keel.

The ports are elongated and made just wide enough for the entrance of the muzzle of the guns in training, and only high enough to allow a moderate elevation and depression of the gun.

The wooden backing is cut away on each side of the ports inside of the casemate, to allow the guns to be trained about one point forward and aft. The gun-ports are covered with wroughtiron sliding plates or shutters five inches thick; those for the four broadside guns are fitted in slides. The sliding plates or shutters for the pivot-guns arc pivoted on the edge, with one bolt that can be knocked out, detaching the shutter, if necessary, and are worked by a combination of racks and pinions.

ARMAMENT.

The armament of the Tennessee consists of six rifled guns, called by the rebels Brooke's rifles.

The two pivot-guns are seven and one eighthinch bore, and the four broad.tide guns are sixinch bore. These guns are rcenforced abaft bytwo wrought-iron bands, two inches thick respectively. Weight of projectiles ninety-five pounds and one hundred and ten pounds solid shot.

The pivot-guns are fitted on wooden slides, with a rack let into them. On an arm attached to the carriage there is a pinion for running out the gun, and by raising the arm the rack is thrown out of gear to allow the gun to recoil.

The arrangements for working the battery, and the implements and machinery employed, appear to be very good.

QUARTERS FOR OFFICERS AND CREW.

The cabin is large and comfortable for an ironclad vessel.

The ward-room is situated immediately over the engine, and is open to it, and although sufficiently commodious, wo are of opinion that it would be impossible for officers or others, to preserve their health, or to live there comfortably for any considerable length of time in the absence of a better and more perfect ventilation than is at present provided.

The quarters of the crew are excellent, and exceedingly comfortable for an iron-clad vessel of her description. These quarters consist of a roomy berth-deck, with rooms fitted up on either side for the junior officers.

The berth-deck communicates with the casemate by means of a large hatch, and is provided with two largo ventilators through the deck, out side of the casemate.

When in port and in moderately smooth sea, it is believed that the berth-deck will be found to be sufficiently well ventilated to insure a reasonable degree of comfort to the crew; but when the ventilators are unshipped, it is believed that the one blower now on board (and which is also used for forcing the fires) is not sufficient to produce a proper circulation of fresh air.

The steering arrangements appear to be very defective, and the accommodations for the pilot and helmsman bad. These defects can, however, be easily remedied and at a small cost.

MACHINERY.

The machinery of the vessel consists of two geared non-condensing engines.

Cylinders twenty-four inches diameter and seven-feet stroke, with poppet-valves arranged, as is the usual mode on board of western river steamers.

These engines were taken out of the river steamer called the Alonzo Child.

They are placed fore and aft in the vessel, geared to an idler-shaft by spur gearing, with wooden teeth, and from the idler-shaft to the propeller shaft by bevel cast-iron gear

BOILERS.

There are four horizontal flue-boilers, twentyfour feet long, placed side by side, with one furnace under the whole of them; the products of combustion returning through the flues are delivered into one smoke-pipe.

The engine and fire-rooms are insufferably hot, and very badly ventilated.

INJURIES RECEIVED IN TIIE ACTION.

The injuries to the casemate of the Tennessee from shot are very considerable. On its after-side

nearly all the plating is started; one bolt driven in; several nuts knocked off inside; gun-carriage of the after pivot-gun damaged, and the steering rod or chain cut near that gun. There are unmistakable marks on the afterpart of the casemate of not less than nine eleven-inch solid shot having struck within the space of a few square foot, in the immediate vicinity of that port On the port side of the casemate the armor is also badly damaged from shot. On that side, nearly amidships of the casemate, and between the two broadside guns, a fifteen-inch solid shot knocked a hole through the armor and backing, leaving on the inside an undetached mass of oak and pine splinters, about three by four feet, and projecting inside of the cascmato about two feet from the side. This is the only shot that penetrated the wooden backing of the casemate, although there are numerous places on the inside, giving evidence of the effect of the shot

There are visible between forty and fifty in dentations and marks of shot on the hull, deck, and casemate, varying from very severe to slight; nine of the deepest indentations on the after part of the casemate, (evidently being eleven-inch shot,) and the marks of about thirty of other calibres on different parts of the vessel.

There are also a few other marks, being, however merely scratches or slight indentations of the plating.

The smoke-stack was shot away, although it is not improbable the heavy ramming by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford, had previously prepared it for its fall.

Three of the wrought-iron port shutters or slides wore so much damaged by shot as to prevent the firing of the guns.

There are no external visible marks or evidences of injury inflicted upon the hull of the Tennessee by the severe ramming by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford; but inasmuch as the decks leak badly, and when there is a moderate sea running in the bay, her reported usual leakage of three inches an hour being now increased to five or six inches an hour, it is fairly to be inferred that the increased leakage is caused by the concussion of the vessels.

The Tennessee is in a state to do good service now.

To restore her to the state of efficiency in which she was when she went into the action with this fleet on the fifth instant, it will be necessary to overhaul much of the iron plating on the port and after sides of the casemate, and replace some of it

The iron gun-port slides or shutters, which were damaged, must be either removed or repaired.

A new smoke-stack is required, and additional ventilators should be fitted.

Blowers are required to produce proper ventilation in the engine-room and on the berth-deck.

When these small repairs and additions shall have been made, the iron-clad Tennessee will be a most formidable vessel for harbor and river service, and for operating generally in smooth water, both offensively and defensively.

The original of this report is accompanied by sectional views of the Tennessee, and a sketch showing the effect of shot on the outside.

We are, very respectfully, your obedient servants, Thornton A. Jenkins,

Captain.

James Ai.den,

Captain.
William E. Lerov,

Commander.

T. Williamson,

Chief-Engineer.

Rear-Admiral D. G. Fakraovjt,

Commanding W. O. D. Squadron, U. S. Flap-Ship Hartfurd. LETTER FROM REAR-ADMIRAL FARRAGLT, TRANSMITTING ADDITIONAL REPORTS OF CAPTAINS DRAYTON, JENKINS, AND MARCHAND.

Flag-ship Hartford, W. O. B. Squadron, I
MoniLB Hat, Aug. 22, 18G4. f

Sir: I have the honor to forward herewith the reports of Captain Drayton of the Hartford, I Captain Jenkins of the Richmond, and Captain J Marchand of the Lackawanna, (marked Xos. 1, 2, and 3,) calling the attention of the Department! to such of the petty officers and crew of their respective ships as particularly distinguished themselves in the action of the fifth instant, entitling them to special notice.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farracu't, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. O. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Weli.es,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.

ADDITIONAL REPORT OF CAPTAIN P. DRAYTON. i'

Flag-ship Hahtford, Mobilb Bat, Aug. 9, 1804.

Sir: I beg leave to call your attention to the conduct of the following petty officers and others of this vessel, during the action of the fifth instant, which I think entitles them to the medal of honor.

1. Thomas Fitzpatrick (Coxswain) was captain of Xo. 1 gun. His gun was almost disabled by the bursting of a shell, which destroyed much of the material, and killed seven men, besides wounding several others, and among them himself. Notwithstanding this, he had the killed and wounded quietly removed, replaced the breeching, side-tackle and truck, etc., which had been cut to pieces, got a crew, and in a little while was firing the gun again as usual. I recommend that in addition to the medal he be made a Master's Mate.

2. Charles Melville (ordinary seaman.) This man, a loader at the same gun, was severely wounded by a piece of the shell. He was taken below, but would not remain there, and although scarcely able to stand, performed his duty until the end of the action.

3. William E. Stanley (shellman at Xo. 8 gun) was severely wounded, but refused to go below, and continued to perform his duties until at length he became so weak from loss of blood, as to be unable to stand.

4. William Pelham, (landsman.) When tho crew of the gun to which he belonged was entirely broken up, owing to the number of its killed and wounded, he assisted to remove the i

latter below, and thon immediately returned, and without any direction to do so, took his place at the adjoining gun, where a vacancy existed, and continued to perform his duties there most faithfully for the remainder of the action.

5. John McFarlan (Captain of Forecastle) was at the wheel, which has been his station in all of the previous fights of this ship. As on every other occasion, he displayed the utmost coolness and intelligence throughout the action. When the Lackawanna ran into us, and for a moment there was every appearance of the men at the wheel being crushed, he never left his station, nor ceased for an instant to attend strictly to his duties. This evidence of coolness and self-possession, together with his good conduct in the other battles of the Hartford, 1 hope will entitle him to the medal.

G. James R. Garrison (coal-heaver) had one of his great toes shot off; but, without leaving his station at the shell-whip, bound up the wound, and remained at work until again severely wounded.

7. Thomas O'Connell, (coal-heaver.) Although on the sick-list and quite unwell, he went to his station at the shell-whip, where he remained until his right hand was shot away.

8. Wilson Brown (landsman) was stationed at the shell-whip on the berth-deck. A man was killed on the ladder above him, and thrown with such violence against Urown as to knock him into the hold, where he lay for a short time senseless, but, on recovering, he immediately returned to his station, though besides himself only one of the original six belonging there had escaped.

9. John Lamson (landsman) was one of the six men stationed at the shell-whip on the berthdeck; a shell killed or wounded the whole number. Lamson was wounded in the leg, and thrown with great violence against the side of the ship, but as soon as he recovered himself, although begged to go below, he refused, and went back to the shell-whip, where he remained during the action.

10. George MeeLage (Paymaster's Steward.) Although quite badly hurt by splinters, refused to leave his station, and performed very efficient service until the end of the action.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. Drayton,

, Captain.

Hon. Gideon Welles,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.

ADDITIONAL REPORT OF CAPTAIN T. A. JENKINS.

U. S. S. S. Richmond, Iksidi or Mobilb Bat, I
August 10, I ->•! f

Sir: In my report of the fifth instant, I expressed my great admiration of, and thanks for, the cool and courageous conduct of every officer and of every man serving on board of this ship, in the terrible conflict with the rebel batteries at Fort Morgan, the iron-clad Tennessee, and gunboats Sclma, Morgan, and Gaines, on tho morning of that day.

I consider it, however, but an act of plain and

simple duty on my part to go further now, and respectfully invite your attention, and that of the Department through you, to the highly meritorious conduct of the under-mentioned petty officers and seamen on board of this ship, who exhibited on that memorable occasion, and in conflict with the rebels previously, a will and determination, and set an example to their shipmates and messmates, worthy, in my opinion, of the highest commendation.

1. William Densmore (Chief Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1804. He has been in the naval service twelve years, was on board the sloop-of-war St. Louis, blockading off Pensacola and the head of the passes of the Mississippi, until the expiration of his term of service in 1861; reshipped tho same year, and joined the Brooklyn; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmctte batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attacks upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1802. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

2. Adam Duncan (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He has been six years in the naval service; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel ironclads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1803.

8. Charles Deakin (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He deserves special notice for his good example and zeal in going to and remaining at his quarters during the whole action, although quite sick. He has been in the naval service six years; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

4. Cornelius Cronan (Chief Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and close attention to duty in looking out for signals, and steering the ship in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He has been in the naval service eight years. Joined the Brooklyn in December, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and

with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of' New-Orleans; and in the attack on the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 18C3.

5. William Wells (Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and close attention to duty as leadsman and lookout, in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morningand forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Joined the Brooklyn in September, 1801. Was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans, and on board of the Brooklyn in tho attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh in 1802. He received two wounds in the left leg, and a severe one in the head, in the engagements with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April twenty-fourth, 1802, the latter causing "opacity of the cornea, and loss of vision of the right eye," as certified by the Surgeon of the Brooklyn. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

6. Henry Sharp (seaman) is recommended for coolness and courage as captain of onehundred pounder rifle-gun on top-gallant forecastle, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1804. Ho fought his gun when under the hottest fire from the enemy's batteries, at short-range, with a coolness and effectiveness that won not only the admiration of the Commanding Officer of the division, but of all others who had an opportunity to observe him. He has been in the naval service thirty-two years; joined the Richmond at Norfolk when first put in commission, twentyseventh September, 1800. At the expiration of his term of service in 1803, reshipped for the period of three years. He was in action on board of the Richmond with the rebels at the head of tho passes of the Mississippi; at the bombardment of Fort McRea at Pensacola, which lasted an entire day, when he received a severe splinter wound in the left hand which permanently disabled two of his fingers, and notwithstanding the severity of tho wound, as soon as it was dressed by the surgeon, he returned to his gun without the permission of the surgeon, and persisted in remaining at his quarters, using his right hand, until the action ceased. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; in action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; fought the batteries of Vicksburgh twice; was in the memorable attack on Port Hudson on the fourteenth of March, 1803; was captain of a nine-inch gun in the naval nine-inch gun buttery, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, placed in rear of Port Hudson during the siege of that place in 1803; he was also captain of a gun in the naval battery established at Baton Rouge, and commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, after the repulse of the army and the death of General Williams at that place.

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