The History of the Anglo-Saxons from the Earliest Period to the Norman Conquest, Volumen2

Portada
Carey & Hart, 1841
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 99 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew : fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild; then silent night, With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train...
Página 102 - Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality without which judgment is cold and knowledge is inert; that energy which collects, combines, amplifies, and animates, the superiority must with some hesitation be allowed to Dryden.
Página 102 - In the second century of the Christian Era, the empire of Rome comprehended the fairest part of the earth, and the most civilized portion of mankind.
Página 99 - And the man brought the men into Joseph's house, and gave them water, and they washed their feet ; and he gave their asses provender.
Página 274 - But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O GOD, is for ever and ever; a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore GOD, even thy GOD, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.
Página 99 - To be, or not to be! that is the question. Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The stings and arrows of outrageous fortune; Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them...
Página 102 - Pope had only a little, because Dryden had more ; for every other writer since Milton must give place to Pope ; and even of Dryden it must be said, that, if he has brighter paragraphs, he has not better poems.
Página 100 - I was yesterday about sunset walking in the open fields, till the .night insensibly fell upon me.' I at first amused myself with all the richness and variety of colours which appeared in the western parts of heaven...
Página 99 - tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them ? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil...
Página 101 - Obedient slumbers that can wake and weep ; Desires compos'd, affections ever even ; Tears that delight, and sighs that waft to Heaven. Grace shines around her with serenest beams, And whispering angels prompt her golden dreams. For her th...

Información bibliográfica