Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

MAY 27 (legislative day APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. SMATHERS, from the Committee on Immigration,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 5417)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 5417) for the relief of Isaac Surmany, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bill authorizes the cancelation of the order of deportation and warrant of arrest and legalizes the entry of this alien upon the enactment into law of this bill.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The bill passed the House of Representatives on April 2, 1940, and the House Report submitted by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization is printed below which explains the bill in detail.

Your committee, having considered all the facts as presented, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

(H. Rept. No. 1792, 76th Cong., 3d sess.)

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 5417) for the relief of Isaac Surmany, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

This bill would authorize the cancelation of the order of deportation and warrant of arrest and legalize his entry upon enactment into law of this bill.

GENERAL INFORMATION

There is no fraud in this case.

The bill was introduced by Congressman Kramer, of California. The alien entered the United States in 1927 on a visitor's visa. He has continued to reside in the United States since his arrival and was married in 1932 to an American citizen and they have two American-born children. The alien is a native of Cuba. He is a man of good character and is law abiding. On account of his American wife and American-born children the committee recommend a favorable report.

[blocks in formation]

MAY 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. SMATHERS, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 6409]

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6409) to record the lawful admission to the United States for permanent residence of Motiejus Buzas and Bernice Buzas, his wife, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bill authorizes and directs the Secretary of Labor to record the permanent residence of the subjects on the 1st day of January, A. D. 1925, and that the warrant of deportation be canceled, and the persons named shall not again be subject to deportation proceedings for the reasons set up in said warrant, and that by the terms of this act they shall not be permitted to become naturalized citizens of the United States.

GENERAL INFORMATION This bill passed the House of Representatives on July 5, 1939, and there is printed below copy of the committee report filed by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization which explains the bill in detail.

Your committee, after carefully considering the facts as presented, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

(H. Rept. No. 726, 76th Cong., 1st sess.)

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the Will H. R. 6409, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

[blocks in formation]

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

This bill merely directs the cancelation of the warrant of deportation and provides that the aliens, husband and wife, shall not again be subject to deportation proceedings for the reasons set forth in the warrant of arrest and under the present order of deportation. It does not grant the privilege to the aliens of applying for citizenship, but it does provide that if the bill is enacted into law that two numbers from the nonpreference category of the quota of the country be deducted during the current quota year.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The bill was introduced by Congressman McLeod, and there appeared on behalf of the aliens a representative, there also appeared a representative of the Department of Labor. The facts presented to the committee and upon which the report is based, are, briefly as follows:

The aliens, Mr. and Mrs. Buzas, came to Canada in 1903, from Lithuania, and became citizens of Canada and lived there until 1925. In 1925 the aliens came to the United States as visitors and have remained in the United States ever since. The alien, Motiejus Buzas, went into the tailoring business in Chicago. When the Department of Labor became aware of the fact that the aliens had overstayed their visitor's visa, they ordered them to depart. The alien, believing that he could return to Canada, sold his business, which amounted to about $3,000, and presented himself, with his wife, to Canadian authorities. Canada, as in such cases, had already canceled his citizenship on account of his absence in the United States. It appears that this alien cannot secure a Lithuanian visa, because Lithuania at the time of these aliens' birth, was a part of Russia, and he cannot secure a Russian visa; therefore, these aliens are without a country and could not be deported under the present law. There is also a son, who was born in Canada and is now 19 years of age. The son has returned to Canada.

A representative of the aliens presented a letter from the commissioner of police of Chicago, bearing on the alien's reputation, also a letter from the Pullman Trust and Savings Bank as to the amount of money he has on deposit, and also filed for the record, letters from officials in Canada refusing to admit them to Canada.

This bill, H. R. 6409, supersedes H. R. 4811, which was the first bill introduced for their relief. The first bill provided that their entry should be made legal and it would have permitted them to proceed to citizenship. The present bill, which supersedes H. R. 4811, was suggested by members of this committee, as they felt that on account of the fact that the aliens came without a visa for permanent residence, they should not expect to receive citizenship.

The committee, after discussing all the facts, and it appearing that the aliens are of good character and are law abiding, reported the bill favorably.

Chicago POLICE DEPARTMENT,

Chicago, May 9, 1939. To Whom It May Concern:

This is to certify that a search of the records of this department disclosed no arrest, conviction, or sentence to imprisonment for any offense under the name of Motiejos Buzas, of 10544 Edbrooke Avenue, Chicago, Ill., U. S. A., during the period of his residence in this city since 1925.

JAMES P. ALLMAN,

Commissioner of Police.

PULLMAN TRUST & Savings BANK,

Chicago, May 9, 1939. BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION, NATURALIZATION DEPARTMENT,

Chicago, Ill. GENTLEMEN: We hereby certify that Mike and Bernice Buzas opened savings account No. 41458 with this bank on January 5, 1939, the present balance in this account being $1,000. Yours very truly,

A. E. PRICE, Cashier.

DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND RESOURCES,

IMMIGRATION BRANCH,

Ottawa, December 30, 1938. MOTIEJUS Buzas, Esq.,

Chicago, IU, United States of America. DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of December 20 regarding your desire to be permitted to return to Canada.

When you were in communication with this Department in October last, you were furnished with particulars regarding the Canadian immigration regulations applicable to British subjects desiring to enter this Dominion. When you were examined by the Canadian immigration officer at Windsor, however, in November it was ascertained you were not a British subject as your naturalization in this Dominion had been revoked. Under the circumstances you were rejected under the provisions of the Canadian Immigration Act, and your appeal has subsequently been dismissed. It is, therefore, regretted the Department could take no action to permit you to return to this Dominion. Yours truly,

A. L. JalLIFFE, Commissioner.

DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND RESOURCES,

Windsor, Ontario, December 30, 1938. Mr. MOTIEJUS Buzas,

Care of Mrs. E. Waitkunas, Detroit, Mich. DEAR SIR: Kindly be advised that the appeal against your rejection at this port on the 22d ultimo, has received the careful consideration of the Honourable, the Minister of Immigration, and I am directed to inform you that same has been dismissed.

You are to understand, therefore, that the entry to Canada of either your wife or yourself cannot be allowed. Yours truly,

0. G. Adams, Inspector in Charge.

« AnteriorContinuar »