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ities now being provided at this location, the Navy Department proposes to operate aircraft from this station for an indefinite future period, the authorization for the purchase of this property is requested in order that the Navy may have the benefit of the use of this land for an indefinite period without the payment of an annual rental, which after approximately 5 years, will exceed the present fair market value of the property:

Key West is favorably located, not only to provide an excellent base to cover the Gulf of Mexico, but also to augment our aviation facilities in covering the approaches to the Panama Canal Zone.

In view of the value to our national defense of the naval air station at Key West, the Committee on Naval Affairs recommends strongly the enactment of this proposed legislation.

The Navy Department favors the enactment of the proposed legislation as indicated by the letter from the Acting Secretary of the Navy to the chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs of the House of Representatives, which is hereby made a part of this report.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 30, 1940. The CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: The bill (H. R. 9140) to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to acquire land at Key West, Fla., was referred to the Navy Department by your committee with a request for its views and recommendation.

It is the purpose of this proposed bill to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to acquire by purchase or condemnation 62 acres of land, more or less, in the city of Key West, Fla., fronting on Palm Avenue on the south and the Gulf of Mexico on the north, having a frontage on Palm Avenue of approximately 1,790.83 feet, and being approximately 1,525.55 feet deep, for the development and expansion of the Naval Air Station, Key West, Fla., at a cost not to exceed $125,000.

The land which the proposed bill authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to acquire is the same land which is now leased by the Navy Department for a Naval Air Station at Key West, Fla. The original lease which is dated January 19, 1940, became effective as of November 27, 1939, and expires June 30, 1940, but is subject to renewal from year to year until June 30, 1945. The annual rental therein provided for is $20,000.

The Navy Department has an option to purchase this land at any time during the life of the lease, or any extension thereof, for the sum of $125,000.

Key West, Fla., was selected as a base for the neutrality patrol because of its strategic location. In the event that the neutrality patrol is discontinued the Key West station can be most advantageously used as a winter training base for an east coast VP squadron. Climatic conditions and the availability of excellent and extensive areas for aircraft gunnery training render this location extremely desirable for routine peacetime operations.

In view of the foregoing, it is recommended that the bill H. R. 9140 be enacted.

The Navy Department has been advised by the Bureau of the Budget that there would be no objection to the submission of this report to the committee. Sincerely,

Lewis COMPTON, Acting. O

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MAY 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. SMATHERS, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 3087]

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill to record the lawful admission to the United States for permanent residence of Chaim Wakerman, known as Hyman Wakerman, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate with amendment, and recommend that the bill, as amended, do pass.

The committee amendment is as follows:
After line 9 start a new paragraph and insert the following:

Upon the enactment of this Act the Secretary of State shall instruct the proper quota-control officer to deduct one number from the nonpreference category of the quota during the current quota year.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bill authorizes and directs the Secretary of Labor to record the lawful admission for permanent residence of the subject, New York, N. Y., on June 23, 1929, and that he shall for all purposes under the immigration and naturalization laws be deemed to have been lawfully admitted as an immigrant for permanent residence. Upon the enactment of this act the Secretary of State shall instruct the proper quota-control officer to deduct one number from the nonpreference category of the quota during the current quota year.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The records indicate that Mr. Wakerman, who is a 31-year old native and citizen of Poland, of the Hebrew race, was on March 7, 1939, found to be subject to deportation on the ground that at the time of his entry into the United States on June 23, 1929, he was not in possession of an unexpired immigration visa, but was permitted to depart at his own expense without the issuance of a warrant of deportation.

Mr. Wakerman's father, now deceased, who was a naturalized citizen of the United States, filed a petition for a nonquota status on behalf of his son as the unmarried minor child of a citizen of the United States. The petition was approved and a nonquota visa under section 4 (a) of the act of 1924 (that is, as the unmarried minor child of a citizen of the United States) was issued to the son on April 24, 1929. Thereafter, and before proceeding to the United States the subject of this report married, so upon arrival in the United States on June 23, 1929, he was not a nonquota immigrant as specified in his immigration visa because not an unmarried child under 21 years of age of a citizen of the United States.

Not having been lawfully admitted, Mr. Wakerman did not acquire United States citizenship through his father. Nevertheless, he obtained a United States passport, apparently on the erroneous assumption by the Department of State that he was legally admitted to the United States. He made one trip abroad and was admitted on August 30, 1937, erroneously as a United States citizen.

Other than the circumstances surrounding the illegal entry Wakerman appears to have been a law-abiding man. He has never been on relief. His wife and child are residing in Poland.

The Polish quota, to which Mr. Wakerman is chargeable, is oversubscribed and, consequently, should he depart under the outstanding departmental order a considerable period of time would elapse before he could return to the United States when in possession of an appropriate immigration visa.

The Department of Labor recommends that the bill receive favorable consideration.

Your committee, after consideration of all the facts as presented, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

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MAY 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. SMATHERS, from the committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 2036)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 2036) for the relief of Umberto Tedeschi, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment, and recommend that the bill do psss.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bill authorizes and directs the Secretary of Labor to cancel the warrant of arrest and order of deportation against the alien and would legalize his entry.

GENERAL INFORMATION

This bill passed the House of Representatives on April 2, 1940, and there is printed below report submitted by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization explaining the bill.

Your committee, after carefully considering all the facts as presented, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

(H. Rept. No. 1800, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) TI Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 2036) for the relief of Umberto Tedeschi, having considered the same, report it back to the House without amendment and recommend that the bili

do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bill would authorize the Secretary of Labor to cancel the warrant of arrest and order of deportation against the alien and would legalize his entry.

GENERAL INFORMATION

There is no fraud in this case.

The bill was introduced by Congressman Cullen of New York. The alien, having been a member of a crew of a steamship, left his ship at Boston in 1924 and has continued to reside here ever since. The record shows that he is a native of Italy and is 42 years of age. It appears that he has been steadily employed as a longshoreman. The committee recommends favorable consideration of this bill.

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