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May 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. ANDREWS, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H R. 6946]

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6946) for the relief of Salvatore Taras, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment and recomment that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

That in the administration of the immigration and naturalization laws, the Secretary of Labor is authorized and directed to cancel the warrant of arrest and the order of deportation heretofore issued against Salvatore Taras, and that the alien shall not hereafter become subject to deportation for the cause contained in the present warrant.

GENERAL INFORMATION

This bill passed the House of Representatives on April 2, 1940, and there is printed below the report filed by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization which explains in detail purposes of the bill.

Your committee after full consideration of the facts as presented, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

(H. Rept. No. 1794, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6946) for the relief of Salvatore Taras, having considered the same, report it back to the House and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The bil! simply asks that the Secretary of Labor be authorized to cancel the warrant of arrest and order of deportation and permit the alien to remain in the United States and not hereafter become subject to deportation for the cause contained in the present warrant. It also provides that the proper quota-control officer deduct one number from the nonpreference category of the quota of the country of which he is a native.

GENERAL INFORMATION

There is no actual fraud in this case.

The bill was introduced by Congressman Cole of New York. The records and evidence produced show that the alien is a native of Italy, that he came to Canada and became a citizen of that country. That in 1926 he entered the United States by coming across the border at Niagara Falls. He is 61 years of age, is single, and his occupation is machinist. He has lived in the United States continuously for 14 years, and as the evidence presented shows that he is industrious and lawabiding, the committee feel that he should be permitted to remain in view of the fact that a quota number will be canceled.

{

SENATE

76TH CONGRESS

3d Session

}

REPORT No. 1690

PROVIDING FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTE

NANCE OF AN ASSAY OFFICE AT HELENA, MONT.

MAY 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Schwartz, from the Committee on Mines and Mining, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 3115)

The Committee on Mines and Mining, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3115) to provide for the establishment and maintenance of an assay office at Helena, Mont., submit the following report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass:

The intent of this bill is to establish and maintain an assay office at Helena, Mont., for the purpose of assaying ore and purchasing gold, and appropriation of such sums as may be necessary to establish, equip, and maintain such an assay office, and to acquire land for construction or rent buildings necessary for the proper functioning of such office.

June 30, 1933, an assay office at Helena and similar offices at Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho, were closed, Congress having provided no funds for their operation beyond that date.

When the minor assay offices were first established they were intended as an accommodation to gold prospectors who desired to have assays of ores made by a Government agency. A few years after their establishment, about 1873, the small assay offices were permitted to extend their activities by purchasing gold in the form of bullion.

The Treasury Department is of opinion that inasmuch as smelting and refining plants developed in all parts of the western country, the importance of the minor assay offices to small miners diminished and the small benefit to the mining industry resulting from their existence has not for many years justified their expense. In the view of the Treasury Department small deposits of gold bullion can now be shipped to any one of six existing institutions, at Seattle, San Francisco, Denver, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and New York, and hence there appears to the Treasury no reason for undertaking to reestablish the activities of the Assay Office at Helena, Mont.

The Treasury Department now maintains assay offices at New Orleans and Seattle, and gold purchased in those offices is transported at Government expense to Denver, Colo., for refining. In Montana the miners now must pay these charges.

It is evident the Treasury Department overlooks (1) that Denver, Colo., is the nearest point to which Montana gold bullion can be sent for purchase and payment, distances of from 878 to 995 miles from Montana gold quartz and placer mines, with consequent heavy expense for express and insurance charges, and (2) the fact that Montana gold production has increased from 57,822 ounces in 1933 to 203,313 ounces in 1938, and gold mining in that State is increasing steadily.

In view of present conditions and records, your committee is of the opinion that the expense of conducting an assay office at Helena will be reimbursed by the fees received from melting and assaying, and that there is real need for such office.

Your committee recommends that S. 3115 be favorably reported.

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{

SENATE

76TH CONGRESS

3d Session

}

REPORT No. 1691

AMENDING THE ACT PROVIDING FOR FEDERAL AID TO THE STATES IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF WILDLIFERESTORATION PROJECTS

May 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. WHEELER, from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 3739]

The Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3739) to amend the act providing for Federal aid to the States in the establishment of wildlife-restoration projects, for the purpose of clearly indicating that such projects are to be owned by the respective States and maintained by them in accordance with the provisions of their laws, having considered the same, report thereon favorably, with a recommendation that the bill do pass without amendment.

The purpose of this bill is to amend section 8 of the act entitled "An act to provide that the United States shall aid the States in wildlife-restoration projects, and for other purposes," approved September 2, 1937, so as to provide that title to any real or personal property acquired, constructed, or improved by any State through the use of funds paid to it under the provisions of this act shall be vested in such State. The measure also imposes on each State the duty to maintain, in accordance with the provisions of its laws any wildlife-restoration project established in such State through the use of funds paid to it under the provisions of this act.

Your committee recommend the enactment of this bill.

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