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I think any of the larger steel companies would substantiate my above statements, particularly due to the results obtained by the operation of the plant here, which is not an experimental one but on a commercial scale.

As Mr. Hecht is the only one who knows this process and the details of its operation, his presence is necessary if the undertaking, especially in a broad application, is to be successful.

Your favorable action permitting Mr. Hecht to become a permanent resident of the United States, I assure you, would be beneficial to the United States steel industry. Respectfully,

L. J. BUCK.

GREAT LAKES STEEL CORPORATION,

Ecorse, Detroit, Mich., February 8, 1940. Mr. E. HECHT, Holland Engineering Co., Republic Building,

Cleveland, Ohio. DEAR MR. HECHT: Referring to your recent visit here, during which we discussed the recovery of steel scrap from our open hearth refuse, I am writing to inquire if arrangements can be made for us to see the installation you have made for Republic at Chicago, and, if so, when it would be convenient for you to show us this installation. Yours very truly,

GREAT LAKES STEEL CORPORATION,
J. A. Clauss, Chief Engineer.

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SENATE

76TH CONGRESS

3d Session

REPORT No. 1687

FLORENCE SINCLAIR COOPER AND DAUGHTER,

MARGARET LAVALLIE, AND PHILIP P. ROY

May 27 (legislative day APRIL 24). 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. ANDREWS, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 1789)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1789) to authorize the cancelation of deportation proceedings in the case of Florence Sinclair Cooper and daughter, Margaret Lavallie, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment, and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The Secretary of Labor is authorized and directed to cancel the deportation proceedings issued pursuant to sections 19 and 20 of the Immigration Act of February 5, 1917 (39 Stat. 889, 890; U. S. C. title 8, secs. 155 and 156), in the case of these aliens any provision of existing law to the contrary notwithstanding. From and after the date of the approval of this act Florence Sinclair Cooper, her daughter, Margaret Lavallie, and Philip P. Roy shall not again be subject to deportation by reason of the same facts upon which the outstanding proceedings rest.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The records show that these people, who are natives of Canada, first entered the United States in 1925. They remained here until 1934, when they returned to Canada for a short visit, reentering the United States at Turner, Mont., on or about June 1, 1934. Mrs. Cooper stated to officers of the Immigration and Naturalization Service that she received relief at the Crow Agency, Mont., from August 1934 to October 1936. She was divorced from her first husband, Edward Lavallie, a native of Canada, in October 1936, and immediately married Theodore Cooper, who was born in the United States and is enrolled as a member of the Crow Indian Tribe. Mrs. Cooper has two grown daughters, two brothers, and her parents residing in Canada. Her present husband, her daughter, Margaret, and two other American-born daughters, are living in the United States.

The grounds upon which these people were made the subject of deportation proceedings were that they were not possessed of appropriate immigration visas at the time of their entry, that they entered without inspection, and that at the time of their entry they were persons likely to become public charges. In December 1938, the Department directed that in view of the circumstances in the case no order of deportation issue, but that they be required to depart from the United States to the country of their nationality, in accordance with existing law.

The subjects appear to be aliens of predominant American Indian blood, apparently have not violated the immigration laws intentionally, since they believed that as persons of Indian blood they were not subject to those laws.

Inasmuch as they are racially ineligible to citizenship, under existing law they could not be legally admitted to the United States for permanent residence and would therefore be permanently separated from their family in this country. Since they are not members of any Indian tride or family, they are not regarded by the Department of Labor as being eligible for admission to the United States under the provisions of the act of April 2, 1928, entitled "An Act to exempt American Indians born in Canada from operation of the Immigration Act of 1924."

The Department of Labor recommends that the bill pass.

Your committee, after carefully considering all the facts in the case, recommend that the bill be favorably reported to the Senate.

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May 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. ANDREWS, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 6083)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6083) for the relief of Morris Burstein, Jennie Burstein, and Adolph Burstein, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill would legalize the entry of the subjects for permanent residence.

GENERAL INFORMATION

This bill passed the House of Representatives on July 31, 1939, and there is printed below report by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization which explains the bill in detail.

Your committee after full consideration of the facts in the case report the bill favorably.

(H. Rept. No. 1218, 76th Cong.. 1st sess.) The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 6083) for the relief of Morris Burstein, Jennie Burstein, and Adolph Burstein, having considered the same, report it back to the House with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendment is as follows:

In line 4, after the comma following the word “laws”, strike out the words "Morris Burstein, Jennie Burstein, his wife, and their son,”.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill, as amended, would legalize the entry of Adolph Burstein for permanent residence.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The bill as introduced was for the purpose of legalizing the entry of Morris Burstein, Jennie Burstein, his wife, and their son, Adolph Burstein.

The committee felt, from the evidence and facts presented, that the father and mother were not entitled to have their entry legalized on account of the fraud perpetrated in securing the visas and citizenship, but that the son, Adolph Burstein being a minor, had no knowledge nor part in the fraud, and, therefore, the committee recommend that his entry be legalized, as to refuse relief to the son would be to penalize him for the action of his parents.

The facts as presented to the committee and upon which this report is based are, briefly, as follows:

This bill was considered before by the committee.

There appeared before the committee Congressman Bloom, the author of the bill, the alien Morris Burstein, and an attorney. There also appeared a representative of the Department of Labor with the files of the Department in the case.

It appears that in 1924 Morris Burstein and his wife, Jennie Burstein, and their son, Adolph Burstein, were imprisoned on political charges; that their property was confiscated; that on release from a Russian prison, they fled to Germany, where Morris Burstein had a brother. They were only permitted to take $100 in money from Russia. On their arrival in Germany, the brother of this alien, Morris Burstein, promised to furnish funds and secure visas for the family so that they might come to the United States. He did procure visas and passage to the United States, the visas being issued on a German birth certificate, but in the proper names of the aliens. Îhe son at that time was 14 years of age.

The father, Morris Burstein, is a pharmacist, and after living in the United States for several years applied for citizenship and was granted a certificate of naturalization on the German birth certificate. Afterward, it was discovered that the birth certificate was false, and his citizenship was canceled.

It also appeared that in 1924 the United States Government was not recognizing visas from Russia.

The alien, Morris Burstein, is now the proprietor of a pharmacy, and produced letters of endorsement setting forth his good character and stating that he was a law-abiding man.

The son Adolph, was graduated from the public schools of New York and New York University. He has attended military camp at Plattsburg, and also received a pilot's license. He completed a course in engineering and has been engaged in experimental work with the United States Air Corps equipment. He is now married to an American citizen and is the assistant chief engineer of Barclay Grow Aircraft.

The bill, as amended, reads as follows:

“That for the purposes of the immigration and naturalization laws, Adolph Burstein shall be considered to have been lawfully admitted at New York, New York, on February 25, 1925, to the United States for permanent residence.”

It appears from the evidence presented that the father and mother cannot be deported, but the committee feel that they must have had knowledge of the fraud perpetrated and for that reason refuse to give the relief asked for them in the hill.

The committee, after full consideration, report the bill favorably as amended.

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