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May 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. King, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 8295)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8295), for the relief of Leo Neumann and his wife, Alice Neumann, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill is to record the admission of the aliens as for permanent residence.

GENERAL INFORMATION

This bill passed the House of Representatives on April 2, 1940, and there is printed below report submitted by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization which explains the bill in detail.

Your committee, after full consideration, report the bill favorably to the Senate.

(H. Rept. No. 1710, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8295) for the relief of Leo Neumann and his wife, Alice Neumann, having considered the same, report it back to the House with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendment is as follows: By adding an additional paragraph after line 7 of said bill which will read as follows:

"Upon the enactment of this act the Secretary of State shall instruct the proper quota-control officer to deduct two numbers from the German quota for the first year that the said German quota is available.”

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill is to record the admission of the aliens as for permanent residence and the amendment would deduct from the German quota two numbers when the same became available.

GENERAL INFORMATION

There is no fraud in this case.

The alien. Leo Neumann and his wife, Alice Neumann, were born in Germany. Leo Neumann graduated with a degree of doctor of laws at Heidelberg, that he became a judge in the commercial court in Berlin and served as such judge for the period of 15 years and until he was dismissed by an order of the German Government in 1933. The court he presided over was a court for commercial affairs and the men selected as judges of such courts have to be of high experience in commercial life. That in addition to his position as a judge in the commercial court he was connected with the real-estate business and conducted the same on a large scale, that after his dismissal as judge of the court he left Germany in 1934 and went to Switzerland. That in the latter part of 1938 he secured a visitor's visa and traveled in different European countries and eventually came to the United States in 1938. That the aliens, when they appeared before the subcommittee, produced letters and documents with reference to their character and their financial standing. From the documents produced it appears that these aliens have from $25,000 to $30,000 in the banks of New York City, and that in addition they have a number of shares of stock in corporations in the United States and other countries. These aliens come highly recommended for honesty and integrity, and from the showing financially it would seem that there is no danger of these aliens ever becoming a public charge.

In view of the facts presented and the fact that there is no fraud connected with the case and that they are without a country, the committee favorably report the bill.

There is attached a number of letters of recommendation. The letters are made a part of this report.

Hotel MARCY,

New York, February 18, 1940. Whom It May Concern:

This is to certify that I have been a lawyer in Berlin, Germany, and that I have known Mr. and Mrs. Leo Neumann for many years.

Mr. Neumann was a wealthy man and has been appointed honorary judge for commercial affairs at the courts in Berlin.

He has been president of several important real-estate corporations in Berlin and owned for himself personally a certain number of valuable pieces of improved and unimproved property.

Mr. NEUMANN has been considered in Germany by the authorities of very good moral character because only personalities of such kind were elected to the office of honorary judge at the courts.

ALBERT POLKE.

THE BOLIVAR,

New York, February 17, 1940. To Whom It May Concern:

Dr. Leo Neumann was president of the Neue Boden Actien Gesellschaft, Berlin, the leading real-estate corporation of that city. He was member of the board of a number of other real-estate corporations.

I have known Dr. Neumann for a long time and believe him to be an absolutely reliable, sound, and trustworthy gentleman.

I was the central European representative of the Irving Trust Co., New York. I am an American citizen.

ALOIS A. F. MARCUS.

NEW YORK, February 18, 1940. To Whom It May Concern:

I, George Musa, a citizen of the United States, and a practicing physician in New York City, wish to state the following:

I have known Dr. and Mrs. Leo Neumann for the past 20 years. I was their doctor and friend and had, therefore, intimate knowledge of the conditions and circumstances in which Dr. Neumann lived. He was a judge in the chamber of commerce in Berlin and had an excellent reputation. I personally know him to be a man of honesty and excellent moral character. He always was a man of very substantial means. He was fortunately able to emigrate from Germany with a large part of his capital and is today in very good financial standing.

GEORGE Musa.

New York City, February 19, 1940. To Whom It May Concern:

I know Dr. Leo Neumann for more than 30 years. He was one of the outstanding persons in the real-estate business in Berlin. He comes from a very rich family in Berlin and was very rich himself. He was an honorary judge in Germany for some years and his reputation was a first-class one, not only in the real-estate line but also in the community of Berlin.

In the beginning of 1933, he left Germany after Hitler came to power and I know of my own knowledge that he is still well-to-do. Very truly yours

M. E. HILL.

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May 27 (legislative day, APRIL 24), 1940.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Hughes, from the Committee on Immigration, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 2684)

The Committee on Immigration, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 2684) for the relief of Emma Knutson, having considered the same, report it back to the Senate without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

PURPOSE OF THE BILL

The purpose of the bill is to authorize and direct the Secretary of Labor to cancel deportation proceedings in the case of Emma Knutson, any provision of existing law to the contrary notwithstanding. From and after the date of the approval of this act, Emma Knutson shall not again be subject to deportation by reason of the same facts upon which the outstanding proceedings rests, and she shall be deemed to have been lawfully admitted at Blaine, Wash., November 18, 1924, as an immigrant for permanent residence.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The subject is an 81-year-old widow, native of Norway, who last entered the United States at Vancouver, B. C., on November 18, 1924, since which time she has continued to reside in this country.

Deportation proceedings were instituted in this case on October 1, 1936. The evidence adduced at the formal hearing indicated that the subject was permanently admitted to the United States during 1868, with her parents; that her father never became naturalized but her mother was issued naturalization October 6, 1885, in Minnesota, at which time the subject was over 28 years of age. The subject herself claims to have proved on a homestead in Minnesota during 1877 under her maiden name; however, the General Land Office

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