Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

To the

Sick and wat onnded Soldiers

of the

Army of the Potomac,

This Volume

IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BY

The Author.

[ocr errors]

PORTRAIT Engraved on Steel by Geo. E. Perine, N. Y.
Disguises and other Scenes, Drawn and Engraved on Wood

by R. O'Brien, New York.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PUBLISHERS' NOTICE.

ous

NO APOLOGY is necessary for adding one more to the numer

“War Books” which already fill a large space in American Literature; for, to the general reader, nothing connected with the Rebellion can be more interesting than the personal experi. ences of those who have been intimately associated with the different phases of military life, in Camp, Field, and lIospital.

The “Nurse and Spy” is simply a record of events which have transpired in the experience and under the observation of one who has been on the field and participated in numerous battles-among which are the first and second Bull Run, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, the Seven days in front of Richmond, Antietam, and Fredericksburg—serving in the capacity of “Spy” and as “ Field Nurse" for over two years.

While in the “Secret Service" as a “Spy,” which is one of the most hazardous positions in the army-she penctrated the cnemy's lines, in various disguises, no less than eleven times; always with complete success and without detection.

Her efficient labors in the different Hospitals as well as her ardnous duties as “ Field Nurse," embrace many thrilling and touching incidents, which are here most graphically described.

[blocks in formation]

Should any of her readers object to some of her disguises, it may be sufficient to remind them it was from the purest motives and most praiseworthy patriotism, that she laid aside, for a time, her own costume, and assumed that of the opposite sex, enduring hardships, suffering untold privations, and hazarding her life for her adopted country, in its trying hour of need.

In the opinion of many, it is the privilege of woman to minister to the sick and soothe the sorrowing—and in the present crisis of our country's history, to aid our brothers to the extent of her capacity--and whether duty leads her to the couch of luxury, the abode of poverty, the crowded hospital, or the terrible battle field-it makes but little difference what costume she assuines while in the discharge of her duties.-Perhaps she should have the privilege of choosing for herself whatever may be the surest protection from insult and inconvenience in her blessed, self-sacrificing work.

The moral character of the work,-being true to virtue, patriotism, and philanthropy--together with the fine embellishments and neat mechanical exccution-will, we trust, render it an interesting and welcome visitor at every fireside.

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »