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the day. Against this I have nothing to say; it is all well enough for women to give the fictions of slavery ; men should give the facts.

I trust that my friends and fellow-citizens of the South will read this book--nay, proud as any Southerner though I am, I entreat, I beg of them to do so. And as the work, considered with reference to its author's nativity, is a novelty—the South being my birth-place and my home, and my ancestry having resided there for more than a century—so I indulge the hope that its reception by my fellow-Southrons will also be novel; that is to say, that they will receive it, as it is offered, in a reasonable and friendly spirit, and that they will read it and reflect upon it as an honest and faithful endeavor to treat a subject of enormous import, without rancor or prejudice, by one who naturally comes within the pale of their own sympathies.

An irrepressibly active desire to do something to elevate the South to an honorable and powerful position among the enlightened quarters of the globe, has been the great leading principle that has actuated me in the preparation of the present volume; and so well convinced am I that the plan which I have proposed is the only really practical one for achieving the desired end, that I earnestly hope to see it prosecuted with energy and zeal, until the Flag of Freedom shall wave triumphantly alike over the valleys of Virginia and the mounds of Mississippi.

H. R. H. JUNE, 1857.

; men should

CONTENTS.

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COMPARISON BETWEEN THE FREE AND THE SLAVE STATES.. 11

Progress and Prosperity of the North-Inertness and Imbe-

cility of the South-The True Cause and the Remedy-
Quantity and Value of the Agricultural Products of the
two Sections—Important Statistics—Wealth, Revenue,
and Expenditure of the several States-Sterling Extracts
and General Remarks on Free and Slave Labor- The Im-

mediate Abolition of Slavery the True Policy of the South.

CHAPTER II.

HOW SLAVERY CAN BE ABOLISHED.....

123

Value of Lands in the Free and in the Slave States—A few

Plain Words addressed to Slaveholders—The Old Ilome-
stead-Area and Population of the several States, of the
Territories, and of the District of Columbia-Number of
Slaveholders in the United States-Abstract of the Au-
thor's Plan for the Abolition of Slavery-Official Power
and Despotism of the Oligarchy-Mal-treatment of the
Non-slaveholding Whites-Liberal Slaveholders, and what
may be expected of them--Slave-driving Democrats--Class-
ification of Votes Polled at the Five Points Precinct in
1856--Parts played by the Republicans, Whigs, Democrats,
and Know-Nothings during the last Presidential Cam-
paign-How and why Slavery should be Abolished with-
out direct Compensation to the Masters—The American
Colonization Society-Emigration to Liberia-Ultimatum

of the Non-slaveholding Whites.

CHAPTER III.

SOUTHERN TESTIMONY AGAINST SLAVERY.

188

What the Fathers of the Republic thought of Slavery-

Opinions of Washington-Jefferson-Madison_Monroe-

Henry-Randolph-Clay-Benton-Mason--McDowell--

Iredell--Pinkney-Leigh-Marshall-Bolling--Chandler

- Summers—-Preston-Fremont-Blair-Maury-Birney,

Delaware-McLane. Maryland - Martin. Virginia—Bill of

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CHAPTER V.

TESTIMONY OF THE NATIONS....

245

The Voice of England--Opinions of Mansfield--Locko-

Pitt-Fox--Shakspeare---Cowper---Milton--Johnson-
Price--Blackstone--Coke_Hampden--Harrington--For-
tescue--Brougham--The Voice of Ireland--Opinions of
Burke-Curran--Extract from the Dublin University Mag-
azine for December, 1856_- The Voice of Scotland--Opin-
ions of Beattie--Miller--Macknight--The Voice of France
-Opinions of Lafayette-Montesquieu---Louis X-Buffon
--Rousseau-Brissot--The Voice of Germany-Opinions
of Grotius-Goethe-Luther-Extract from the Letter of
a living German writer to his Friends in this Country,
The Voice of Italy—Opinions of Cicero--Lactantius—Leo
X— The Voice of Greece-Opinions of Socrates-Aristotle
-Polybius-Plato.

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CHAPTER VIII.

FREE FIGURES AND SLAVE....

281

Opening Remarks-General Statistics of the Free and of
the Slave States— Tonnage, Exports, and Imports-Pro-
ducts of Manufactures--Miles of Canals and Railroads in
Operation--Public Schools-Libraries other than Private
-Newspapers and Periodicals--Illiterate White Adults-

- National Political Power of the two Sections—Popular

Vote for President in 1856-Patents Issued on New In-

ventions—Value of Church Property-Acts of Benevo-

lence-Contributions for the Bible Cause, Tract Cause,

Missionary Cause, and Colonization Cause- Table of

deaths in the several States in 1850- Number of Free

White Male Persons over fifteen years of age engaged in

Agriculture or other out-door Labor in the Slave States-

Falsity of the Assertion that White Men cannot cultivate

Southern Soil-White Female Agriculturists in North

Carolina-Number of Natives of the Slave States in the

Free States, and of Natives of the Free States in the Slave

States-Value of the Slaves at $100 per head-List of

Presidents of the United States-Judges of the Supreme

Court-Secretaries of State-Presidents of the Senate

Speakers of the House-Postmasters General Secretaries

of the Interior-Secretaries of the Treasury--Secretaries

of War-Secretaries of the Navy-Result of the Presiden-

tial Elections in the United States from 1796 to 1856--Aid

for Kansas--Contributions for the Sufferers in Ports-

mouth, Va., during the Prevalence of the Yellow Fever in

the Summer of 1855-Congressional Representation--Cus-

tom House Receipts-When the Old States were Settled and

the New Admitted into the Union-First European Set-

tlements in America--Freedom and Slavery at the Fair

- What Freedom Did-- What Slavery Did-Average Value

per Acre of Lands in the States of New York and North

Carolina.

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CHAPTER IX.

COMMERCIAL CITIES-SOUTHERN COMMERCE...

331

Plea for a great Southern Commercial City-Importance of

Cities in General-Letters from the Mayors of sundry
American Cities, North and South-Wealth and Popula-
tion of New-York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New Orleans,
Boston, St. Louis, Brooklyn, Charleston, Cincinnati, Louis-
ville, Chicago, Richmond, 'Providence, Norfolk, Buffalo,
Savannah, New-Bedford,' Wilmington-Wealth Concen-
trated at Commercial Points Boston and its Business-
Progressive Growth of Cities-A Fleet of Merchantmen-
Commerce of Norfolk-Baltimore, Past, Present, and Fu-
ture-Insignificance of Southern Commerce-Enslavement
of Slaveholders to the Products of Northern Industry--
Almost Utter Lack of Patrioitsm in Southern Merchants
and Slaveholders.

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