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Northern publisher. Benton writes history and prepares voluminous compilations, whicli are given to the world through a Northern publisher. Simms writes novels and poems, and they are scattered abroad from the presses of a Northern publisher. Eighty per cent of all the copies sold are probably bought by Northern readers.

When will Southern autho. 3 understand their own interests? When will the South, as a whole, abandoning its present suicidal policy, cnter upon that career of prosperity, greatness, and true renown, to which God by his word and his providences, is calling it ? “If thou take away from the midst of thee the yoke, the putting forth of the finger and speaking vanity; and if thou draw out thy soul to the hungry and satisfy the afflicted soul ; then shall thy light rise in obscurity and thy darkness be as the noonday: And the Lord shall guide thee continually and satisfy thy soul in drought, and make fat thy bones ; and thou shalt be like a watered garden, and like a spring of water, whose waters fail not. And they that shall be of thee shall build the old waste places ; thou shalt raise up the foundations of many generations; and thou shalt be called, The repairer of the breach, The restorer of paths to dwell in."

Our limits, not our materials, are exhausted. We would gladly say more, but can only, in conclusion, add as the result of our investigations in this department of our subject, that Literature and Liberty are inseparable ; the one can nerer hare a rigorous eristence without being wedded to the other.

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Our work is done. It is the voice of the non-slaveholding whites of the South, through one identified with them by interest, by feeling, by position. That voice, by whonisoever spoken, must yet be heard and heeded. The time hastens—the doom of slavery is written—the redemption of the South draws nigh.

In taking leave of our readers, we know not how we can give more forcible expression to our thoughts and intentions than by saying that, in concert with the intelligent free voters of the North, we, the non-slaveholding whites of the South, expect to elevate JOHN C. FREMONT, CASSIUS M. CLAY, JAMES G. Birsey, or some other Southern nonslaveholder, to the Presidency in 1860 ; and that the patriot thus elevated to that dignified station will, through our cordial co-operation, be succeeded by William II. SewARD, CHARLES SUUNER, John McLean, or some other nonslaveholder of the North ;--and furthermore, that if, in these or in any other similar cases, the oligarchs do not quietly submit to the will of a constitutional majority of the people, as expressed at the ballot-box, the first battle between freedom and slavery will be fought at home and may God defend the right!

THE END.

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NOTICE TO THE READER.—The few typographical errors which occur in this, the first edition of the work in hand, shall be found corrected in the socond and subsequent editions. We will here call attention to only three of the most palpable of those errors. They are as follows :--The word "only" in the 17th line of the 151st page, should be duty. The word " different" in the 10th line of the 158th page, should be difficult. The word "more" in the 19th line of the 191st page, should be none.

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Abstract of the Author's Plan for the Abolition of Slavery, 155.
Achenwall, 29.
Adams, John Quincy, 239.
Agriculture and other out-door pursuits, number of free white male

Southrons engaged in, 298.
Agricultural Products.-See Corn, Wheat, Rye, Oats, Barley, Hay,

Cotton, Tobacco, &c. &c.
Animals Slaughtered, Value of, 71.
Anti-slavery Letters from native Southrons, 374.
Area of the several States and Territories, 143.
Aristotle, 256.
Attorneys-General, 312.
Baltimore, Letter from the Mayor of, 337.
Baltimore, Past, Present, and Future, 352.
Baltimore, Why this Work was not published there,
Bancroft, George, 384.
Bank Capital of the several States, 286.
Banks, James, 384.
Baptist Testimony, 263.
Barley, 36.
Barnes, Rev. Albert, 259.
Beans and Peas, 37.
Beattie, James, 251.
Beeswax and Honey, 64.
Benton, Thomas H., 19, 105, 167, 207.
Bible Testimony, 275—Bible Cause Contributions, 295.
Birney, James G., 214, 413.
Blackstone, Sir William, 248.
Blair, Francis P., 105, 167, 213.
Bolling, Philip A., 211.
Book Making in America, 392.
Booth, Abraham, 268.
Boston, Letter from the Mayor of, 338.
Botts, John M., 167.
Brisbane, Rev. Mr., 263.
Brissot, 253.
Brooklyn, Letter from the Mayor of, 339.
Brougham, Lord, 250.
Browne, R. K., 322.
Buchanan, James, 170.
Buckwheat, 37.
Buffalo, Letter from the Mayor of, 344.
Buffon, 253.
Burke, Edmund, 250.
Butler, Bishop, 261.

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Butter and Cheese, 64.
Cameron, Paul C., 49, 55.
Canals, miles of, in the several States, 285.
Cane, Sugar, 53, 65.
Cortwright, Dr., of New Orleans, 301.
Catholic Testimony, 271.
Chandler, Mr., of Virginia, 211.
Charleston, Letter from the Mayor of, 310.
Chicago, Letter from, 342.
Churches, Value of, in the several States, 291.
Cicero, 251.
Cincinnati, Letter from the Mayor of, 340.
Cities, nine Free and nine Slave, 347.
Clarke, Dr. Adam, 269.
Clarke, Judge, of Mississippi, 223.
Clay, Henry, 205.
Clay, Cassius M., 206, 301, 413.
Clay, C. C., 56.
Clinton, De Witt, 242.
Clover and Grass Seed, 37.
Coke, Sir Edward, 249.
Colonization Movements, 183.
Colonization Cause Contributions, 296.
Commercial Cities—Southern Commerce, 331.
Comparison between the Free and the Slave States, 11.
Corn, 35, 69.
Cotton, 53, 65.
Cowper, William, 247.
Cragin, A. H., 190.
Curran, John Philpot, 250.
Curtis, Mr., of Virginia, 101.
Darien (Georgia) Resolutions, 231.
Davis, Ilenry Winter, 167.
Deaths in the several States in 1850, 297.
DeBow, J. D. B., 30, 50, 83,
Dublin University Magazine, 251.
Emigration to Liberia, 183.
Episcopal Testimony, 261.
Etheridge, Emerson, 167, 173.
Expenditures of the several States, 80.
Exports, 283.
Facts and Arguments by the Wayside, 360.
Farms, Cash Value of, 71.
Faulkner, Charles James, 98, 175.
Flax, 62-Flaxseed, 88.
Fortescue, Sir John, 249.
Fox, Charles James, 246.
Franklin, Benjamin, 235.
Free Figures and Slave, 281.
Free White Agriculturalists in the Slave States, 298.

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