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TABLE NO. XVIII.

VALUE OP FARMS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS IN THE FREE STATES —1850.

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$286,376,541 , $56,990,237' $2,233,058,619 TABLE NO. XIX.

VALUE OF FARMS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS IN THE SLAVE STATES —1850.

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Alabama

Arkansas

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maryland

Mississippi....

Missouri

North Carolina.
South Carolina.

Tennessee

Texas

Virginia

$21,690,112

6,647,969

1,849,281

2,880,058

25,728,416

29,661,436

11,152,275

7,997,634

19,403,662

19,887,580

17,717,647

15,060,015

29,978,016

10,412,927

38,656,659

$4,823,485
1,163,313
373,665
514,685
6,339,762
6,462,598
1,458,990
1,954,800
3,636,582
3,367,106
5,767,866
3,502,637
6,401,765
1,116,137
7,502,986

$60,448,887

16,866,541

19,390,310

6,981,904

101,647,595

160,190,299 87,891,336 89,641,988 60.501,561 67,207 068 71,823,298 86,568,038

103,211,422 18,701,712

223,423,315

$253,723,687 $51,388,377 $1,183,995,274

RECAPITULATION—FREE STATES.

Value oflive Stock $286,376,541

Value of Animals slaughtered 56,990,237

Value of Farms, Farming-Implements and Machinery, 2,233,058,619

82,576,425,897 RECAPITULATION—SLAVE STATES.

Value of Live Stock $253,723,687

Valno of Animals slaughtered 54,388,377

Value of Farms, Farming Implements and Machinery, 1,183,995,274

$1,492,107,338

DIFFERENCE IN VALUE—FARMS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS.

FreeStatos, $2,576,425,397

Slave States 1,492,107,338

Balance in favor of the Free States T $1,084,318,059

By adding to this last balance in favor of the free States the differences in value which we found in their favor in our account of the bushel-and-pound-measure products, we shall have a very correct idea of the extent to which the undivided agricultural interests of the free States preponderate over those of the slave States. Let us add the differences together, and see what will be the result.

BALANCE ALL IN FAVOR OF THE NORTH.

Difference in the value of bushel-measure products.. $44,782,636 Difference in the value of pound-measure products.. 59,199,108 Difference in the value of farms and domestic animals 1,084,818,059

Total $1,188,299,803

No figures of rhetoric can add emphasis or significance to these figures of arithmetic. They demonstrate conclu the general government, have had the fullest opportunities to exert their influence, to exhibit their virtues, and to commend themselves to the sober judgments of enlightened and discriminating minds. Had we counted the Territories on the side of the North, and the District of Columbia on the side of the South, the result would have been still greater in behalf of free labor. Though "the sum of all villanies" has but a mere nominal existence in Delaware and Maryland, we have invariably counted those States on the side of the South; and the consequence ie, that, in many particulars, the hopeless fortunes of slavery have been propped up and sustained by an imposing array of figures which of right ought to be regarded as the property of freedom. But we like to be generous to an unfortunate foe, and would utterly disdain the use of any unfair means of attack or defence.

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"We shall take no undue advantage of slavery. It shall have a fair trial, and be judged according to its deserts. Already has it been weighed in the balance, and found wanting; it has been measured in the half-bushel, and found wanting; it has been apprized in the field, and found wanting. Whatever redeeming traits or qualities it may possess, if any, shall be brought to light by subjecting it to other tests.

It was our desire and intention to furnish a correct table of the gallon-measure products of the several States of the Union; but we have not been successful in our attempt to procure the necessary statistics. Enough is known, however to satisfy ns ^iat the value of the milk, wine, ardent spirits, malt L^iors, fluids, oils, and molasses, annually produced and sold in the free States, is at least fifty millions of dollars greater than the value of the same articles annually produced and sold in the slave States. Of sweet milk alone, it is estimated that the monthly sales in three Northern cities, New York, Philadelphia and Boston, amount to a larger sum than the marketable value of all the rosin, tar, pitch, and turpentine, annually produced in the Southern States.

Our efforts to obtain reliable information respecting another very important branch of profitable industry, the lumber business, have also proved unavailing ; and we are left to conjecture as to the amount of revenue annually derived from it in the two grand divisions of our country. The person whose curiosity prompts him to take an account of the immense piles of Northern lumber now lying on the wharves and houseless lots in Baltimore, Richmond, and other slaveholding cities, will not, we imagine, form a very flattering opinion of the products of Southern forests. Let it be remembered that nearly all the clippers, steamers, and small craft, are built at the North; that large cargoes of Eastern lumber are exported to foreign countries ; that nine-tenths of the wooden-ware used in the Southern States is manufactured in New England; that, in outrageous disregard of the natural rights and claims of Southern mechanics, the markets of the South are forever filled with Northern furniture, vehicles, ax helves, walking canes, yard-sticks, clothes-pins and pen-holders; that the extraordinary number of factories, steam-engines, forges and machine-shops in the free States, require an extraordinary quantity of cord-wood ; that a large majority

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