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LIVING QUESTIONS

A COLLECTION

OF ALL THE RECORDED UTTERANCES OF ABRAHAM LIN-
COLN BEARING UPON THE QUESTIONS

OF TODAY.

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+ UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

Copyrighted 1900,

by H. S. TAYLOR.

REQAN PRINTING HOUSE, OHIOAGO

At the present time, when our Great Republic seems to te rapidly entering upon new and untried ways of profound moment to us and our posterity, it is but a reasonable prudence that the American people should seek counsel from the now universally admitted wisdom and patriotism of ABRAHAM LINCOLN. To facilitate such inquiry is the purpose of this book,

In the following pages are presented, as we believe, every recorded quotable expression of Mr. Lincoln bearing upon questions of to-day, with dates and places of delivery and with authorities therefor cited. For convenience these quotations have been arranged topically. Every accessible source of information has been attentively examined by the editors, patiently and fairly, with the purpose of collecting in one compact volume everything of enduring value and present application that ever fell from the lips or flowed from the pen of the Great Emancipator.

In the course of our investigations, besides numerous files of old newspapers, pamphlets, etc., the following well known authors have been consulted, viz. : Bancroft, Sumner, Arnold, Barrett, Brockett, Herndon and Weik, Raymond, Hanaford, Howells, Powers, Piatt, Townsend, Schurz, Coffin, Morse, VanBuren, Gilmore, Lamon, Tarbell and Davis, Hapgood, Nicolay and Hay, Carpenter, Irelan, Kelly, Stoddard, Coggeshall, Boyd, Tarbell and Shibley.

H. S. TAYLOR.
D. M. FULWILER.

AUTOBIOGRAPHY.

1

(December 20, 1859, Letter to J. W. Fell-Complete Works, Nico

lay and Hay, Vol. I, p. 596.)

If any

J. W. Fell, Esq.

My dear Sir: Herewith is a little sketch, as you requested. There is not much of it, for the reason, I suppose, that there is not much of me. thing be made out of it, I wish it to be modest, and not to go beyond the material. If it were thought necessary to incorporate anything from any of my speeches, I suppose there would be no objection. Of course it must not appear to have been written by myself. Yours very truly. A. Lincoln.

I was born February 12, 1809, in Hardin county, Kentucky. My parents were both born in Virginia, of undistinguished families--second families, perhaps I should say. My mother, who died in my tenth year, was of a family of the name of Hanks, some of whom now reside in Adams, and others in Macon county, Illinois. My paternal grandfather, Abraham Lincoln, emigrated from Rockingham county, Virginia, to Kentucky about 1781 or 1782, where a year or two later he was killed by the

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