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(c) All charges for said craft shall be paid at the office of the harbor master at Honolulu, Hilo, Port Allen, or Kahului on or before the 15th day of each month, between the hours of 7 and 10 a. m., and all charges not paid by such specified time of each month will be subject to a 25 per cent penalty; Provided, That the craft in question has been in port during the time mentioned; and all such craft which have not entered port between the 1st and 15th of the month must pay their charges as soon as they enter port after the said date.

(d) Any such watercraft which have not paid the charges due from them by the close of the month in which such charges fall due shall be deprived of all rights and privileges enjoyed by said craft under the jurisdiction of the board until all dues and penalties are paid.

(e) All watercraft using or taking gasoline or distillate as motor power in the harbors of Honolulu, Hilo, and Kahului will be required to take same from a tank wagon or tank station, through a hose, the lower connection of said hose to fit as tight as possible on the intake of the boat's tank, and any of the above-named craft taking her gasoline or distillate in drums must not transfer the same to her tanks while such craft is inside the waters of Honolulu, Hilo, and Kahului harbors.

RULE XXI.--DONKEY ENGINES AND DERRICKS ON WHARVES.

(a) Transportation companies, corporations, or individuals using donkey engines on wharves, said donkey engines being the property of the Territory of Hawaii, shall pay for the use of same the sum of $2 per day, or part thereof, fuel and lubricating oil to be provided by the user of said donkey, engines.

(6) Transportation companies, corporations, or individuals using derricks on wharves, said derricks being the property of the Territory of Hawaii, shall pay for their use $1 per day, or part thereof.

SCHEDULE OF TOLLS COLLECTED ON FREIGHT PASSING OVER TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT

WHARVES,

DEFINITIONS—Tolls.—The charge for cargo conveyed on, over, or through any territorial wharf, both inward and outward, or loaded or discharged while ship is moored in any slip, basin, or channel.

Foreign freight.-Incoming foreign freight to include all freight shipped to an island port from any port outside of the Hawaiian Islands. Outgoing foreign freight to include all freight shipped from an island port to any port outside of the Hawaiian Islands. Inter or intraisland freight to include all freight shipped from one island port to any other Island port.

Incoming freight (foreign).'

Rates of toll:
Rate. Live stock:

Rate General merchandise, per ton..

$0.15

Cattle, horses, and mules, per head.. $0.50 Fertilizer, per ton.

.05

Colts and calves (under a year old) per
Coal, per ton..

. 10
head..

. 25 Coke, per ton..

. 10
Hogs, per head

. 10 Explosives, per ton...

1.00
Sheep, per head

.05 Lumber and lumber products:

Pigs (50 pounds and under).

.05 Lumber, per 1,000 feet, board measure.. 225 Goats and dogs..

. 10 Shingles, per bundle.

.01

Chickens, crate measurement, per ton.. . 20 Laths, per bundle.

.01
Dressed animals, per ton..

20 Fence posts, each.

005 Automobiles: Ties, per 1,000 feet, board measure.. 225

Which leave wharf on own wheelsPiles, up to 20 feet in length, each. .05

2,000 pounds and under, each.

50 Piles, 20 to 50 feet, each..

2,000 to 3,000 pounds, each.. Piles, 50 feet and over, each..

. 10
3,000 pounds and over, each..

1.00
Crated (or which do not leave wharf
on own wheels) per ton........

. 20 1 Rates apply per ton of 2,000 pounds weight, or 40 cubic feet measurement, whichever basis creates the greater revenue.

Outgoing freight (foreign).1

. 075

. 75

Rates of toll:
Rate. Rates of toll-Continued.

Rate. Sugar, per ton....

$0.075 Bananas (20 bunches per ton), per ton.. $0.075 Coffee, per ton.

.075

General merchandise (everything not Pineapples (canned), per ton.

listed above), per ton...

. 15 Fresh pineapples (crated), per ton... .075 NOTE.-Ship stores, supplies, and bunker coal exempt of toll.

.075

Inter and intraisland freight."

[blocks in formation]

(One charge for use of wharves at point of shipment and discharge.) Rates of toll;

Rate. Live stock-Continued. General merchandise, per ton..

$0.10

Hogs, per head.. Sugar, per ton...

.05

Sheep, per head. Coffee, per ton.

.05

Pigs (50 pounds and under), per head... Pineapples, per ton..

.05

Goats and dogs... Bananas, per ton...

.05

Chickens, crate measurement, per ton.. Fertilizer, per ton.

.05

Dressed animals, per ton. Explosives, per ton..

.50 Automobiles: Lumber and lumber products:

Which leave wharf on own wheelsLumber, per 1,000 feet, board measure.. .11

2,000 pounds and under, each.. Shingles, per bundle..

.005

2,000 to 3,000 pounds, each... Laths, per bundle.

3,000 pounds and over, each. Fenceposts, each.

.0025

Crated or which do not leave wharf on Ties, per 1,000 feet, board measure. . 11

own wheels, per ton.. Piles, up to 20 feet in length, each. .025 Minimum packages (100 pounds and under Piles, 20 to 50 feet each...

exempt): Piles, 50 feet and over, each.

.05

101 to 500 pounds, each. Firewood, per cord.

. 15

501 to 1,000 pounds, each.. Fresh fish, per ton...

. 40

1,001 and over, each. Live stock:

Cattle, horses, and mules, per head. . 25
Colts and calves (under a year old), per

head..

25 . 375

.005

. 50

. 10

.04

025 05 10

. 125

RULES OF THE ROAD-INTERNATIONAL RULES TO PREVENT COLLISIONS

OF VESSELS.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following regulations for preventing collisions at sea shall be followed by all public and private vessels of the United States upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels.

ART. 30. Nothing in these rules shall interfere with the operation of a special rule, duly made by local authority, relative to the navigation of any harbor, river, or inland waters.

PRELIMINARY. In the following rules every steam vessel which is under sail and not under steam is to be considered a sailing vessel, and every vessel under steam, whether under sail or not, is to be considered a steam vessel.

The words "steam vessel” shall include any vessel propelled by machinery.
A vessel is “under way,

,” within the meaning of these rules, when she is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.

RULES CONCERNING LIGHTS AND SO FORTH. The word "visible" in these rules when applied to lights shall mean visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere.

ARTICLE 1. The rules concerning lights shall be complied with in all weathers from sunset to sunrise, and during such time no other lights which may be mistaken for the prescribed lights shall be exhibited.

2. A steam vessel when under way shall carry-(a) On or in front of the foremast, or if a vessel without a foremast, then in the fore part of the vessel, at a height above the hull of not less than twenty feet, and if the breadth of the vessel exceeds twenty feet, then at a height above the hull not less than such breadth, so, however, that the light need not be carried at a greater height above the hull than forty feet, a bright white

light, so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least five miles.

(b) On the starboard side a green light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the starboard side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles,

(c) On the port side a red light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the port side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(d) The said green and red side lights shall be fitted with inboard screens projecting at least three feet forward from the light, so as to prevent these lights from being seen across the bow.

ART.

(e) A steam vessel when under way may carry an additional white light similar in construction to the light mentioned in subdivision'(a). These two lights shall be so placed in line with the keel that one shall be at least fifteen feet higher than the other, and in such a position with reference to each other that the lower light shall be forward of the upper one. The vertical distance between these lights shall be less than the horizontal distance.

ART. 3. A steam vessel when towing another vessel shall, in addition to her side lights, carry two bright white lights in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and when towing more than one vessel shall carry an additional bright white light six feet above or below such lights, if the length of the tow measuring from the stern of the towing vessel to the stern of the last vessel towed exceeds six hundred feet. Each of these lights shall be of the same construction and character, and shall be carried in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), excepting the additional light, which may be carried at a height of not less than fourteen feet above the hull.

Such steam vessel may carry a small white light abaft the funnel or aftermast for the vessel towed to steer by, but such light shall not be visible forward of the beam.

Art. 4. (a) A vessel which from any accident is not under command shall carry at the same height as a white light mentioned in article two (a), where they can best be seen, and if a steam vessel in lieu of that light two red lights, in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and of such a character as to be visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least two miles; and shall by day carry in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen, two black balls or shapes, each two feet in diameter.

(b) A vessel employed in laying or in picking up a telegraph cable shall carry in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), and if a steam vessel in lieu of that light three lights in a vertical line one over the other not less than six feet apart. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red, and the middle light shall be white, and they shall be of such a character as to be visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least two miles. By day she shall carry in a vertical line, one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen, three shapes not less than two feet in diameter, of which the highest and lowest shall be globular in shape and red in color, and the middle one diamond in shape and white.

(c) The vessels referred to in this article, when not making way through the water, shall not carry the side lights, but when making way shall carry them.

(d) The lights and shapes required to be shown by this article are to be taken by other vessels as signals that the vessel showing them is not under command and can not therefore get out of the way.

These signals are not signals of vessels in distress and requiring assistance. Such signals are contained in article thirty-one.

ART. 5. A sailing vessel under way and any vessel being towed shall carry the same lights as are prescribed by article two for a steam vessel under way, with the exception of the white lights mentioned therein, which they shall never carry.

ART. 6. Whenever, as in the case of small vessels under way during bad weather, the green and red side lights can not be fixed, these lights shall be kept at hand, lighted and ready for use; and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to prevent collision, in such manner as to make them most visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side, nor, if practicable, more than two points abaft the beam on their respective sides. To make the use of these portable sights more certain and easy the lanterns containing them shall each be painted outside with the color of the light they respectively contain, and shall be provided with proper screens.

ART. 7. Steam vessels of less than forty, and vessels under oars or sails of less than twenty tons gross tonnage, respectively, and rowing boats, when under way, shall not be required to carry the lights mentioned in article two (a), (b), and (c), but if they do not carry them they shall be provided with the following lights:

First. Steam vessels of less than forty tons shall carry

(a) In the fore part of the vessel, or on or in front of the funnel, where it can best be seen, and at a height above the gunwale of not less than nine feet, a bright white light constructed and fixed as prescribed in article two (a), and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(b) Green and red side lights constructed and fixed as prescribed in article two (b) and (c), and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least one mile, or a combined lantern showing a green light and a red light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on their respective sides. Such lanterns shall be carried not less than three feet below the white light.

Second. Small steamboats, such as are carried by seagoing vessels, may carry the white light at a less height than nine feet above the gunwale, but it shall be carried above the combined lantern mentioned in subdivision one (b).

Third. Vessels under oars or sails of less than twenty tons shall have ready at hand a lantern with a green glass on one side and a red glass on the other, which, on the approach of or to other vessels, shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision, so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.

Fourth. Rowing boats, whether under oars or sail, shall have ready at hand a lantern showing a white light which shall be temporarily exhibited 'in sufficient time to prevent collision.

The vessels referred to in this article shall not be obliged to carry the lights prescribed by article four (a) and article eleven, last paragraph.

ART. 8. Pilot vessels when engaged on their station on pilotage duty shall not show the lights required for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the masthead, visible all around the horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light or flare-up lights at short intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes.

On the near approach of or to other vessels they shall have their side lights lighted ready for use, and shall flash or show them at short intervals, to indicate the direction in which they are heading, but the green light shall not be shown on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.

A pilot vessel of such a class as to be obliged to go alongside of a vessel to put a pilot on board may show the white light instead of carrying it at the masthead, and may, instead of the colored lights above mentioned, have at hand, ready for use, a lantern with green glass on the one side and red glass on the other, to be used as prescribed above.

Pilot vessels when not engaged on their station on pilotage duty shall carry lights similar to those of other vessels of their tonnage.

A steam pilot vessel, when engaged on her station on pilotage duty and in waters of the United States, and not at anchor, shall, in addition to the lights required for all pilot boats, carry at a distance of 8 feet below her white masthead light a red light, visible all around the horizon and of such a character as to be visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere at a distance of at least two miles, and also the colored side lights required to be carried by vessels when under way.

When engaged on her station on pilotage duty and in waters of the United States, and at anchor, she shall carry in addition to the lights required for all pilot boats the red light above mentioned, but not the colored side lights. When not engaged on her station on pilotage duty, she shall carry the same lights as other steam vessels.

ART. 9. Fishing vessels and fishing boats, when under way and when not required by this article to carry or show the lights hereinafter specified, shall carry or show the lights prescribed for vessels of their tonnage under way.

(a) Open boats, by which is to be understood boats not protected from the entry of sea water by means of a coutinuous deck, when engaged in any fishing at night, with outlying tackle extending not more than one hundred and fifty feet horizontally from the boat into the seaway, shall carry one all-round white light.

Open boats, when fishing at night, with outlying tackle extending more than one hundred and fifty feet horizontally from the boat into the seaway, shall carry one all-round white light, and in addition, on approaching or being approached by other vessels, shall show a second white light at least three feet below the first light and at horizontal distance of at least five feet away from it in the direction in which the outlying tackle is attached.

(b) Vessels and boats, except open boats as defined in subdivision (a), when fishing with drift nets, shall, so long as the nets are wholly or partly in the water, carry two white lights where they can best be seen. Such lights shall be placed so that the vertical distance between them shall be not less than six feet and not more than fifteen feet, and so that the horizontal distance between them, measured in a line with the keel, shall be not less than five feet and not more than ten feet. The lower of these two lights shall be in the direction of the nets, and both of them shall be of such a character as to show all around the horizon, and to be visible at a distance of not less than three miles.

Within the Mediterranean Sea and in the seas bordering the coasts of Japan and Korea sailing fishing vessels of less than twenty tons gross tonnage shall not be obliged to carry the lower of these two lights. Should they, however, not carry it, they shall show in the same position (in the direction of the net or gear) a white light, visible at a distance of not less than one sea mile, on the approach of or to other vessels.

(c) Vessels and boats, except open boats as defined in subdivision (a), when line fishing with their lines out and attached to or hauling their lines, and when not at anchor or stationary within the meaning of subdivision (h), shall carry the same lights as vessels fishing with drift nets. When shooting lines, or fishing with towing lines, they shall carry the lights prescribed for a steam or sailing vessel under way, respectively.

Within the Mediterranean Sea and in the seas bordering the coasts of Japan and Korea sailing fishing vessels of less than twenty tons gross tonnage shall not be obliged to carry the lower of these two lights. Should they, however, not carry it, they shall show in the same position in the direction of the lines) a white light, visible at a distance of not less than one sea mile on the approach of or to other vessels.

(d) Vessels when engaged in trawling, by which is meant the dragging of an apparatus along the bottom of the sea

First. If steam vessels, shall carry in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a) a tricolored lantern so constructed and fixed as to show a white light from right ahead to two points on each bow, and a green light and a red light over an arc of the horizon from two points on each bow to two points abaft the beam on the starboard and port sides, respectively; and not less than six nor more than twelve fect below the tricolored lantern a white light in a lantern, so constructed as to show a clear, uniform, and unbroken light all around the horizon.

Second. If sailing vessels, shall carry a white light in a lantern, so constructed as to show a clear, uniform, and unbroken light all around the horizon, and shall also, on the approach of or to other vessels, show where it can best be seen a white flare-up light or torch in sufficient time to prevent collision.

All lights mentioned in subdivision (d) first and second shall be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(e) Oyster dredgers and other vessels fishing with dredge nets shall carry and show the same lights as trawlers.

(f) Fishing vessels and fishing boats may at any time use a flare-up light in addition to the lights which they are by this article required to carry and show, and they may also use working lights.

(g) Every fishing vessel and every fishing boat under one hundred and fifty feet in length, when at anchor, shall exhibit a white light visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least one mile.

Every fishing vessel of one hundred and fifty feet in length or upward, when at anchor, shall exhibit a white light visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least one mile, and shall exhibit a second light as provided for vessels of such length by article eleven.

Should any such vessel, whether under one hundred and fifty feet in length or of one hundred and fifty feet in length or upward, be attached to a net or other fishing gear, she shall on the approach of other vessels show an additional white light at least three feet below the anchor light, and at a horizontal distance of at least five feet away from it in the direction of the net or gear.

(h) If a vessel or boat when fishing becomes stationary in consequence of her gear getting fast to a rock or other obstruction, she shall in daytime haul down the day signal required by subdivision (k); at night show the light or lights prescribed for a vessel at anchor; and during fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rain storms make the signal prescribed for a vessel at anchor. (See subdivision (d) and the last paragraph of article fifteen.)

i (i) In fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rain storms drift-net Vessels attached to their nets, and vessels when trawling, dredging, or fishing with any kind of drag net, and vessels line fishing with their lines out, shall, if of twenty tons gross tonnage or upward, respectively, at intervals of not more than one minute make a blast; if steam vessels, with the whistle or siren, and if sailing vessels, with the foghorn, each blast to be followed by ringing the bell. Fishing vessels and boats of less than twenty tons gross tonnage shall not be obliged to give the above-mentioned signals; but if they do not, they shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than one minute.

(k) All vessels or boats fishing with nets or lines or trawls, when under way, shall in daytime indicate their occupation to an approaching vessel by displaying a basket or other efficient signal where it can best be seen. If vessels or boats at anchor have their gear out, they shall, on the approach of other vessels, show the same signal on the side on which those vessels can pass.

The vessels required by this article to carry or show the lights hereinbefore specified shall not be obliged to carry the lights prescribed by article four (a) and the last paragraph of article eleven.

ART. 10. A vessel which is being overtaken by another shall show from her stern to such last-mentioned vessel a white light or a flare-up light.

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