The Federalist: a Collection of Essays Written in Favor of the New Constitution as Agreed Upon by the Federal Convention, September 17, 1787: Reprinted from the Original Text, with an Historical Introduction and Notes by Henry B. Dawson ...Vol. 1, Volumen1

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1864 - 615 páginas

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Página 311 - No state shall, without the consent of congress, lay any duty on tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.
Página 267 - Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation and reporting to Congress and the several legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall when agreed to in Congress and confirmed by the States render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government and the preservation of the Union.
Página 541 - ... that as nothing can contribute so much to its firmness and independence as permanency in office — this quality may, therefore, be justly regarded as an indispensable ingredient in its constitution, and in a great measure as the citadel of the public justice and the public security. The complete independence of the courts of justice is peculiarly essential in a limited constitution.
Página 171 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Página 61 - Under such a regulation, it may well happen that the public voice, pronounced by the representatives of the people, will be more consonant to the public good than if pronounced by the people themselves, convened for the purpose.
Página 614 - To balance a large state or society [says he], whether, monarchical or republican, on general laws, is a work of so great difficulty, that no human genius, however comprehensive, is able, by the mere dint of reason and reflection, to effect it.
Página 346 - For this reason that convention, which passed the ordinance of government, laid its foundation on this basis, that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments should be separate and distinct, so that no person should exercise the powers of more than one of them at the same time.
Página 244 - ... the definition of them may be rendered inaccurate, by the inaccuracy of the terms in which it is delivered. And this unavoidable inaccuracy must be greater or less, according to the complexity and novelty of the objects defined.
Página 285 - It has been urged and echoed, that the power " to lay " and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay " the debts, and provide for the common defence and " general welfare of the United States...
Página 330 - But ambitious encroachments of the federal government, on • the authority of the State governments, would not excite the opposition of a single State or of a few States only ; they would be signals of general alarm. Every government would espouse the common cause. A correspondence would be opened. Plans of resistance would be concerted.

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