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LONDON
SMITH, ELDER, & CO., 15 WATERLOO PLACE

1876 +

(All rights reserved]

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I. INTRODUCTORY.

SECTION

PAGE

| 22. His culture . . . 19

SECTION

1. Connection of theology and

| 23. His attack on 'enthusiasm'

morality . . . .

,

I

24. Ridicule and truth . . 21

2. The divorce of theology and 125. Philosophical affinities.

morality . . . .

26. “Enquiry concerning Virtue?

2

27. Shaftesbury's optimism . .

II. THE INTELLECTUAL SCHOOL 28. His theology

3. Chief writers of the school. 3 29. His attack on divines . .

4. Its starting-point . . . 4

30. A future state . ..

5. Influence of Hobbes . . 5 31. The moral sense . .

6. Clarke's moral theory · 5

32. The moral criterion .

7. His difficulty .

33. Harmony , .

8. Nugatory character of

34. Shaftesbury's influence .

results . . . . 8 35. Mandeville . . . . 33

9. Wollaston's modification . 9 36. Corruption of man

4

10. His utilitarianism . . .

37. Political economy. - 34

11. Eternal and immutable laws. 10 38. Meaning of his doctrine .

12. Price's Review'. . . 12 | 39. Virtue and asceticism . .

13. The intellect and the emo- 40. Virtue fictitious . . ..

tions . . . . 13 41. Mandeville's view of nature. 39

14. Result of his teaching . . 14 l-42. Mandeville and Shaftesbury.

43. Replies. . . . . 41

III. SHAFTESBURY AND MANDE-

| 44. W. Law's Reply to Mande-

VILLE.

ville . .

. . 42

-15. Origin of new schools . . 45. Berkeley's “Minute Philo-

Dó. Common-sense school. .

sopher' . . . . 43

17 restions at issue. .

46. Brown on the Characteristics' 44

ftesbury's school . .

19. Mandeville's school

| IV. The Common-Sense School.

. . 17

om 20. Shaftesbury . . .

47. Butler and Shaftesbury. . 46

h21. Tris Whiggism . . . 18 | 48. Butler's sermons . . . 46

99

100

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SECTION

PAGE

94. Hume's crude psychology 88

95. Value of his criticism. .

96. Scientific view of morality .

97. Experience the foundation . 90

98. Hume's purpose . . .

99. Hume and Butler . .

100. “Natural' and artificial '

virtues . . . .

101. Meaning of the distinction . 94

102. Hume and modern theories . 95

103. The utilitarian standard . 96

104. Practical weakness of Hume 97

105. The moral calculus . . 98

106. Lowering of the standard . 99

107. Need of sociology . .

108. Necessary postulate . .

109. Laxity of Hume's view .

110. Reaction from theological

view . . . . 102

III. Moral sanctions . . . 103

112. Altruistic sentiments . .

113. Conflict with selfish school

114. Theological utilitarianism . 105

115. Waterland's morality .

116. His definition of virtue . 107

117. Its convenience . . . 108

118. Gay on morality. .

119. Abraham Tucker. .

120. Tucker's Light of Nature' III

121. The · Vision' . . . III

122. Tucker's philosophical posi-

tion . . . . 112

.

123. His religious opinions .

. 113

.

124. His mundane soul' .

125. His meaning . . . I 16

126. The selfish theory . . 116

127. Association . . • 117

128. The case of Regulus. . 118

129. Equality of happiness . I 20

130. Tucker's optimisin

. 120

131. Paley's morality . . 121

132. Paley on the moral sense . 121

133. His definition of virtue 122

134. The criterion . . . 123

135. Paley a typical moralist . 124

136. Paley and Bentham . . 125

137. Bentham's influence . . 126

138. His value as a moralist . 120

139. His philosophical weakness 127

140. Transition to a later period , 127

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