The Cambridge Modern History, Volumen7

Portada
Sir Adolphus William Ward
The University Press, 1905
 

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Contenido

Colonial literature
60
Questions of taxation
66
Relations with the natives
76
Canadian government
82
Proprietary colony of Louisiana
88
Success of the sugar islands
95
French relations with negroes
101
French colonial taxation
107
Expulsion of the Acadians
113
General Braddocks expedition
123
Activity of Montcalm
129
xxiv
131
PAGE
133
Failure of the attack
135
Capture of Quebec
141
Parties and opinions in England
147
Disaffection in Massachusetts
153
The Boston tea riot
159
Battle of Lexington
165
Rising in Virginia
169
CHAPTER VI
175
Whig view The Virginia charters
197
Support in return for protection
203
CHAPTER VII
209
Burgoyne in difficulties
215
Clarkes campaigns in the Ohio valley
221
Battle of Cowpens March of Cornwallis
227
Causes of American success
233
Pennsylvania and Massachusetts Declarations
239
Address to the States Call for a Convention
245
Second resolution Representation
252
Dangers of disruption Rule of suffrage
258
Further debate on equality
264
Argument for a single House
270
Sixth resolution Enumeration of powers
276
Importation of slaves Navigation laws
282
Various modes of election proposed
288
Efforts for a Council
294
Other resolutions
300
CHAPTER IX
305
New issues of paper money
312
Alien and Sedition Acts French Convention
322
Search and impressment
328
War with Great Britain
334
British defeat on Lake Erie
340
Battle of Lundys Lane
343
CHAPTER XI
348
War and manufactures
353
Tariff reduced Jackson reelected
382
The Abolitionists and the right of petition
388
Texas annexed War with Mexico
394
Discovery of gold in California
400
The Slavery question
406
Frémont commands in the West
459
Federal advance to Manassas
465
CHAPTER XV
472
Seven Days Battles
478
Hooker succeeds Burnside
484
Lees unmolested retreat
490
Grant moves to Pittsburg Landing
496
Grants movements against Vicksburg
502
Battle of Murfreesborough
508
CHAPTER XVI
514
Lees withdrawal Sherman at Chattanooga
520
Shermans march through Georgia
526
Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley
532
Grants advance Capture of Petersburg
538
Lincoln at Richmond
544
The two navies The blockade
550
Military importance of the blockade
558
Orleans
559
Torpedoing of the Albemarle
564
Cape Breton and Île de Saint Jean
568
Fluctuations in the price of gold
570
Lincolns dealing with peace overtures
576
Fugitive slaves
582
Democratic opposition to Lincoln
588
Emancipation adopted in West Virginia
594
Thirteenth Amendment adopted
601
CHAPTER XIX
603
Increase in the central power
609
Financial devices
615
CHAPTER XX
622
Breakdown of Carpetbag governments
642
Failure of the Democratic reaction
647
CHAPTER XXI
655
Harrison elected President
661
The United States and Hawaii
667
McKinley elected President
673
Naval war Dewey captures Manila
679
Question of the cession of the Philippines
685
CHAPTER XXII
687
Difficulties of the West
693
Tariff and Protection
699
Railroad expansion and speculation
705
Recent progress in the United States
711
Relation of exports to imports
717
CHAPTER XXIII
723
Eighteenth century Jonathan Edwards
729
Legislation and unwritten
735
The Hartford Wits Brown I
741
Changes in New England Whitman Harte
747
CHAPTER IV
772
Louisiana and the Huguenots
780
Fall of Louisbourg
836
Indignation in the South
853

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Página 424 - I do not expect the house to fall, but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new, North as well as South.
Página 419 - THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...
Página 572 - That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state, or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward and forever free...
Página 582 - Fondly do we hope — fervently do we pray — that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, " The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.
Página 350 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Página 189 - O ! ye that love mankind ! Ye that dare oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth ! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the Globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O ! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.
Página 582 - Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding.
Página 454 - And once more let me tell you it is indispensable to you that you strike a blow. I am powerless to help this. You will do me the justice to remember I always insisted that going down the bay in search of a field, instead of fighting at or near Manassas, was only shifting, and not surmounting, a difficulty; that we would find the same enemy and the same or equal intrenchments at either place. The country will not fail to note, is now noting, that the present hesitation to move upon an intrenched enemy...
Página 259 - Resolved, that each branch ought to possess the right of originating acts; that the national legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the legislative rights vested in Congress by the Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate states are incompetent or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation...
Página 220 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.

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