Property and Prophets: The Evolution of Economic Institutions and Ideologies

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M.E. Sharpe, 2002 M11 20
"Property and Prophets" is a concise history of the rise and subsequent triumph of capitalism. Focused primarily on England until 1800 and the United States since 1800, the book's economic history is interspersed with the history of ideas that evolved along with the capitalist system.

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Contenido

Laissez Faire and the Ideology of Businessmen
129
A New Christian Paternalist Ethic
130
Simon Pattens Economic Basis for the New Ethic
132
The New Paternalism and the New Deal
134
Summary
136
Appendix
137
The Consolidation of Monopoly Power and the Writings of Veblen
151
Business Collusion and Government Regulation
153

The Increase in LongDistance Trade
17
The PuttingOut System and the Birth of Capitalist Industry
19
The Decline of the Manorial System
21
The Creation of the Working Class
23
Other Forces in the Transition to Capitalism
24
Feudal Paternalism in Early Capitalism
26
Summary
29
The Conflict in Mercantilist Thought
31
The Secularization of Church Functions
32
Protestantism and the Individualist Ethic
36
The Economic Policies of Individualism
38
Summary
39
Classical Liberalism and the Triumph of Industrial Capitalism
41
The Rise of Classical Liberalism
44
Classical Liberalism and Industrialization
53
Summary
54
Socialist Protest Amid the Industrial Revolution
65
Liberal Social Legislation
69
Socialism Within the Classical Liberal Tradition
70
William Thompson and the Rejection of Classical Liberalism
72
Other Important PreMarxist Socialists
77
Summary
83
Marxs Conception of Capitalism
85
The Market
88
The Class Structure of Capitalism
91
Marxs View of Private Property
95
Marxs View of Capital
100
Summary
103
Marxs Social and Economic Theories
105
The Labor Theory of Value and Surplus Value
108
The Accumulation of Capital
110
Sectoral Imbalances and Economic Crises
111
Economic Concentration
113
The Capitalist State
114
The Socialist Revolution
116
The Rise of Corporate Capitalism and Its Ideological Defenses
118
The Concentration of Income
122
Reemergence of the Classical Liberal Ideology
123
The Neoclassical Theory of Production
125
Subsequent Modifications of Neoclassical Theory
126
Laissez Faire and the Social Darwinists
127
Changes in the Structure of Capitalism
155
The Antagonistic Dichotomy of Capitalism
156
Private Property ClassDivided Society and Capitalism
157
Government and the Class Struggle
160
Capitalist Imperialism
161
The Social Mores of Pecuniary Culture
163
Summary
167
Economic Prosperity and Evolutionary Socialism
169
The Fabian Socialists
171
The German Revisionists
174
The Fate of Evolutionary Socialism
176
Summary
177
Imperialism and Revolutionary Socialism
178
American Imperialism
182
Imperialism and Evolutionary Socialism
183
Rosa Luxemburgs Analysis of Imperialism
185
Lenins Analysis of Imperialism
187
Summary
189
Keynesian Economics and the Great Depression
190
The Economics of Keynes
193
Keynesian Economics and Ideology
197
The Efficacy of Keynesian Economic Policies
198
The Warfare Economy
200
Summary
203
Contemporary American Capitalism and Its Defenders
205
Contemporary Classical Liberal Ideology
210
Contemporary Variants of the Classical Liberal Ideology
212
The Contemporary Corporate Ethic and Capitalist Ideology
214
Anticommunism as Capitalist Ideology
217
Criticisms of Contemporary Capitalist Ideologies
222
Summary
229
Contemporary American Capitalism and Its Radical Critics
233
The War in Vietnam
234
The Womens Liberation Movement
237
Contemporary Critics of American Capitalism
241
Liberal Versus Radical Critiques of Capitalism
255
Radical Political Movements in the 1960s 1970s 1980s and 1990s
258
Summary
262
Index
265
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Página 48 - By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention, v Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it.
Página 48 - Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of the society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily, leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.
Página 87 - In considering such transformations a distinction should always be made between the material transformation of the economic conditions of production which can be determined with the precision of natural science, and the legal, political, religious, aesthetic or philosophic — in short ideological forms in which men become conscious of this conflict and fight it out.
Página 107 - The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his "natural superiors,*' and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous "cash payment...
Página 57 - In that early and rude state of society, which precedes both the accumulation of stock and the appropriation of land, the proportion between the quantities of labour necessary for acquiring different objects seems to be the only circumstance which can afford any rule for exchanging them for one another.
Página 47 - It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our , dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity, but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities, but of their advantages.
Página 48 - By pursuing his own interest, he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.
Página 108 - What, then, constitutes the alienation of labour? First, the fact that labour is external to the worker, ie, it does not belong to his essential being; that in his work, therefore, he does not affirm himself but denies himself, does not feel content but unhappy, does not develop freely his physical and mental energy but mortifies his body and ruins his mind.
Página 44 - It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do as well as to determine what we shall do. On the one hand, the standard of right and wrong, on the other, the chain of causes and effects, are fastened to their throne.
Página 86 - The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society — the real foundation, on which rise legal and political superstructures and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness.

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