Money and Its Laws: Embracing a History of Monetary Theories, and a History of the Currencies of the United States

Portada
H. V. and H. W. Poor, 1877 - 623 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Why governments cannot issue convertible currencies
54
Always a forced loan
57
Circulation of Banks in inverse ratio to their solvency
59
The source of all monetary theories
65
Emancipation of the exact sciences from the Aristotelian methods
73
Locke called upon to refute
79
Its impracticability
86
An imaginary value no value
91
Profit of Banks
96
Does not displace a corresponding amount of coin
98
Could derive no advantage from provisions designed to promote the general
101
The universal equivalent is money
105
The convenient the natural medium of exchange
111
Money the highest form of finished work
115
Absurdity of such distinctions 120 Absurdity of such distinctions
121
Money material for the reason that it is always going into the arts
127
Advantages resulting from the use of the former
129
Advances to be made to merchants only as the representatives of manu
135
Contrast between the old and new races
142
Sketch of the history of usury note
143
Money the measure of value and money the instrument of commerce
149
Importance of an equilibrium of the precious metals the world over 56
157
That of FreeTrade one of realization or enjoyment
160
The sneaking arts of underling tradesmen have made England what
166
One of the most distinguished disciples of Smith
173
Stewart a striking example of the weakness and folly of the Schoolmen
181
Money for domestic exchanges may differ from that used in foreign
189
Mr Pitts operations from 1794 to 1797
196
Not the excess alone but all the issues of the Bank speedily return
202
WILLIAM HUSKISSON
216
The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation 1817
223
His assumptions wholly opposed to the fact
229
Great inflation of the currency and rise of prices
236
Committee of the House of 1832 upon the extension of the Bank Charter
242
Report of the Committee
243
Testimony of the experts opposed to every principle on which currency
247
Report of the Committee upon the Bank 490
254
Condition of the Bank Feb 29 1832 note
257
Its reserves to have reference to domestic as well as to foreign trade
269
Reflections Suggested by a Perusal of the Pamphlet of Mr J Horsley
274
Causes of the disasters of 1839
280
Lord Overstone the real author of the act of 1844
289
Notes and deposits to be dealt with upon different principles
291
Its effect to create two Banks of issue
298
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
304
Note issue a monopoly in England
310
Value essential only in the latter
316
Or to cause valueless articles to circulate
322
The cause
328
Money when used as such always used as capital
333
Fallacy of this assumption 873
374
Henry FAWCETT
375
The nature of credits
381
Absurdity of his description
387
amount of work 209
396
Great bankers dominate men of science
403
commission
415
His inferior currency
421
264
424
The appeal to the empirical has fully sustained the conclusions of induc
427
First issue of 3000000 June 22d 1775
430
The use of gold and silver as money proves them to be capital in a peculiar
433
Order of Congress that the notes pass at their nominal value
437
270
440
Recommends a repeal of the law making the notes the equivalent of gold
443
Ricardo the central figure of the new school of Economists as Smith of
446
Wretched condition of the nation
449
Address of Congress to the people
454
Gouverneur Morris and Hamilton in reference to the Bank note
463
Ist Payment of the debts contracted during the late war 168
469
The Bank opposed as a political rather than a financial measure
472
Complete triumph of his ideas in his election 1800
480
Necessity for a new Bank
486
Effect upon the revenues
495
Objections to the use of State Banks by the government
501
Continued warfare upon the Bank
507
Identity of his political principles with those of Calhoun
510
The mischief arising from its control over the currency
516
Consequences of the refusal to extend its charter
522
Reasons for General Jacksons attack on the Bank
524
The Mississippi Scheme
527
Their suspension and resumption
530
283
531
Must sustain the Banks of the States
536
Amount of their capital and loans note
539
In Massachusetts
545
271
550
Banking in Michigan
552
The Banks in consequence compelled to suspend
560
The folly of his attempt to issue demand notes
567
Draws the bill for the second issue of notes
573
Criminality involved in their issue
579
Mr Chases misstatement of history 682
582
This to be furnished by parties possessed of capital 586 A convertible currency can never be issued by a government
586
The government notes to be demonetized as the condition of resumption
593
The losses arising from the use of Banks not due to their circulation
600
The question of issuer the first to be decided
606
Interests of Banks always in harmony with those of the public
612
METHOD OF RESCAPTIOX AMOCXT OF COIX REQCIRED
617

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 465 - That every power vested in a government is in its nature sovereign, and includes, by force of the term, a right to employ all the means requisite and fairly applicable to the attainment of the ends of such power, and which are not precluded by restrictions and exceptions specified in the Constitution, or not immoral, or not contrary to the essential ends of political society.
Página 2 - Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold; and the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone.
Página 505 - The authority of the Supreme Court must not, therefore, be permitted to control the Congress or the Executive when acting in their legislative capacities, but to have only such influence as the force of their reasoning may deserve.
Página 143 - Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of any thing that is lent upon usury: unto a stranger thou mayest lend upon usury; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon usury...
Página 505 - Each public officer, who takes an oath to support the constitution, swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others. It is as much the duty of the house of representatives, of the senate, and of the President, to decide upon the constitutionality of any bill or resolution which may be presented to them for passage or approval, as it is of the supreme judges, when it may be brought before them for judicial decision.
Página 472 - Resolved, that the several States composing the United States of America, are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government; but that by compact under the style and title of a Constitution for the United States...
Página 143 - Unto a stranger thou mayest lend upon usury ; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon usury : that the LORD thy God may bless thee in all that thou settest thine hand to in the land whither thou goest to possess it.
Página 473 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Página 488 - Waiving the question of the constitutional authority of the Legislature to establish an incorporated bank as being precluded in my judgment by repeated recognitions under varied circumstances of the validity of such an institution in acts of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the Government, accompanied by indications, in different modes, of a concurrence of the general will of the nation...
Página 510 - ... few/ and to govern by corruption or force, are aware of its^ power, and prepared to employ it. Your banks now furnish your only circulating medium, and money is plenty or scarce, according to the quantity of notes issued by them. While they have capitals not greatly disproportioned to each other,, they are competitors in business, and no one of them can exercise dominion over the rest ; and although, in the present state of the currency, these banks may and do operate injuriously upon the habits...

Información bibliográfica