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confirmation in the Holy Spirit's own inditing ; they think the evil that St. Paul laments as ever present, making him do that which he hated, and neglect that which his spirit loved, is worse than any other crime; they seem determined to leave him behind as no example, and to renew their efforts, to dive deeper, and find something in self that will do better than simple faith. St. Paul and St. John were content to hear the trial of an evil nature, and to seek for justification by faith, saying, 'whosoever is justified by works, he is fallen from grace :'--fallen, most truly! for grace sets the captive free; but these prisoners read their Master's command to come forth, and refuse to hear Him; they want to stay in their cells till they can make fine clothes to cover their poor ones : although a new garment is provided for them by their Lord, their pride forbids their accepting it, and there they wait, toiling in the dark, making and altering, until death pays his visit, clothes them with immortality, and compels them to see the truth. Then the gracious Saviour, having loved His own which were in the world, loveth them unto the end, receives them into the kingdom prepared for them from the foundation of the world;' all their slowness of heart to believe what the prophets and apostles had spoken of Him is forgotten, all their unbelief forgiven; their hard thoughts of Him not charged against them; but they are welcomed, because one with Him and with the Father, and members of His mystical body. What a blessed people are we ! What happy rejoicing beings should believers be! How unvarying should be their song of

praise!”

CHAPTER XXV.

ELIJAH SAID I HAVE BEEN VERY JEALOUS FOR THE LORD

GOD OF HOSTS : BECAUSE THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL HAVE

FORSAKEN THY COVENANT, THROWN DOWN THINE ALTARS, ....AND I, EVEN I ONLY, AM LEFT.'-1 Kings xix. 14.

BUT WHAT SAITII THE ANSWER OF GOD UNTO HIM? I HAVE

RESERVED TO MYSELF SEVEN THOUSAND MEN, WHO HAVE NOT BOWED THE KNEE TO BAAL.'-Rom. xi. 4.

MR. HARDING's house being on the road homewards, it had been settled that the travellers should return thither in their way back; they found their friends much as they had left them; the Percys were just returned from a short visit they had been making, and they took an early opportunity of calling.

Mary was sorry to find Mrs. Percy complaining of the dulness and monotony of the place and people. She told her that they had accepted every invitation at the houses of the religious families, and tried to meet every advance towards making an acquaintance, but they never seemed to get any further : the parties were so extremely heavy and uninteresting, from the cold manner of the people and their seldom introducing any religious conversation that might enlighten those who knew little on the subject, that they began to grow tired of joining them. “Indeed,” said Mrs. Percy, “ Colonel Percy says he sees no use in them, he is quite tired of the thing; if he could hear any thing new or interesting; if they would look like other people, and talk without seeming afraid of opening their lips for fear of giving offence, he would attend them with pleasure; but really no one has an idea how formal, and cold, and silent they are, and one never learns any thing from them except a little patience : there they sit and sigh, and look like so many condemned criminals. I should have thought that religious people would be cheerful and happy; and I cannot help thinking now, that some of our good neighbours must be so, if they would but be natural, and show their real sentiments; but they seem to think it a sin to laugh, and a folly to look lively. Oh, I am afraid we are considered sad worldly people; for Percy thinks it right to keep up his old friends, and not being much tempted by the he sees

more of the officers and the

new,

ور

country people than he would if he could get on at all with the others; but they are so repulsive in their manners, and so terribly shy and formal, that he can make nothing of them.”

Mary spoke to her friend on the danger of quitting those whose principles certainly were, on the whole, correct, to associate with others who probably possessed none. Mrs. Percy said they wished to do what was right, and Colonel Percy and she had been anxious to hear something of religion, and, she added, “ to become religious characters ourselves; but we were looked upon as gay military people, I suppose, and not fit associates for them, and they never gave us any encouragement, but always seemed to consider us as outcasts, and to imply by their manner that we did not belong to them. In short, my dear Miss Conroy, we found we got no good by going to their parties ; all we ever heard was a discussion about societies and schools, and an occasional sentence on the duties of a Christian; and as we seemed looked upon as heretics, and perhaps were not in a fit state to enter into their rules and sentiments, we just fell into our old ways again, and visited those who would look a little glad to see us, and did not require us to assume all that unnatural formality. I see, Miss Conroy, that

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