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Civil expenses.

Foreign intercourse

Interior Department

Indian department

Pensions, militaryi

"naval

Relief of sundry individuals.

War Department

*Pay department . .

Commissary department......

Quartermaster's departments

Ordnance " ,

Engineer's " «

Provost Marshal General •

Adjutant General

Secretary's oflico, (army expenditures)..
Relief of.sundry individuals ...

Deduct excess of repayment from Surgeon General's dept.

JVatH/ Department

Secretary's bureau

Marine Corps « TM.

Bureau of Yards and Docks

Equipment and Recruiting..

Navigation

Ordnance

Construction and Repair

Steam Engineering

Provisions and Clothing

Medicine and Surgery ,

Relief of sundry individuals ~...

Interest on the public debt, includingjTreasury notes..

Principal of public debt Jr.

Miscellaneous...« „ .. ,..

Total for year..

7,430,000 67

40.858,986 38

9,932,402 63

2,051,903 37

6,770,114 77

243,539 74

3,594.375 28

30,009 80

:86,453,179 35
2,003,477 53

$10-831,200 08
1,492,017 83
4,777,808 83
5,103,001 09

351,001 92
8.494,216 32
8,075,210 81
6,154,888 23
2,244,775 99
95,708 73

102,841 79

284,449,701 82

43.321,118 52
138,067,741 09

020,321,725 61
27,430,744 81

1,141,072,866 09

10,831,174 87

85,438,867 31

4,690.077 00

3,233,414 08

105,058 33

1,495,788 53

8,514,008 23

750,466 41

95,200.330 88 41,915 25

10.5t5.843 51 1.4 j0.903 68 3,828,198 13 3,577.311 08

551.981 85 1,921.788 09 4,545,500 72 2,940,003 19 1,440,642 70 88.099 72

152,970 97

* Bounties (report Secretary of War, 1866, p. 391,)

$7,662,736

t Of this there were paid for bounties and arrears by "Division of Referred Claims," as shown on p. 6, Report of Paymaster General, 1867.-412,700,000 00

X Includes foreign and miscellantoue.

| General and staff officers- ;....i $1,329,805 50

Signal corps - 2,580 00

Engineers 358,327 50

Ordnance ,.... 502,113 50

Cavalry 1 3.084.738 00

Artillery 2,233,622 60

Infantry 12,970.063 50

Scouts and bands .... . , 300,540 09

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ADDENDA.

A Bill relating to the Freednien's Bureau and Providing for its Discontinuance.

Be it enacted, &c. That the duties and powers of «ommissioner of the bureau for the relief of fieedmen and refugees shall continue to be discharged by the present commissioner of the bureau, and in case of a vacancy in said office occurring by reason of his death or resignation, the same shall be filled by appointment of the President- on the nomination of the Secretary of War, and with the advioe and consent of the Senate; and no officer of the army shall be detailed for service as commissioner, or shall enter upon the duties of commissioner, unless appointed by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; and all assistant commissioners, agents, clerks, and assistants shall be appointed by the Secretary of War, on the nomination of the commissioner of the hureau. In case of vacancy in the office of commissioner happening during the recess of the Senate, the duties of the commissioner shall be discharged by the aqting assistant adjutant general of the bureau until such vacancy can be filled.

Sec. 2. That the commissioner of the bureau shall, on the 1st day of January next, cause the said bureau to be withdrawn from the several States within which said bureau has acted, and its operations shall be discontinued. But the educational department of the said bureau, and the collection and payment of moneys due to soldiers, sailors, and marines, or their heirs, shall be continued, as now provided by law, until otherwise ordered by act of Congress: Provided, however, That the provisions of this section shall not apply to Sny State Which shall not, on the 1st of January next, be restored to its former political relations with the Government of the United States, and be entitled to representation in Congress.

Passed both Houses.

Joint Resolution excluding from the Electoral College Votes of States lately in Bebellion which shall not have been Beorganized. Resolved, &c., That none of the States whose inhabitants were lately in rebellion shall be entitled to representation in the electoral college for the choice of President or Vice President of the United States, nor shall any electoral votes be received or counted from any of such States, unless at the time prescribed by law for the choice of electors the people of such State, pursuant to the acts of Congress in that behalf, shall have, since the 4th day of March, 1867, adopted a constitution of State government, under which a State government shall have been organized and shall be in operation; nor unless such election of electors shall have been held under the authority of such constitution and government, and such State shall have also

become entitled to representation in Congress pursuant to the acts of Congress in that behalf: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to apply toiany State which was represented in Congress on the 4th day of March, 1867.

July 20—The President sent a veto, of which these are the most important paragraphs:

"The mode and manner of receiving and counting the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States are in plain and simple terms prescribed by the Constitution. That instrument imperatively requires that the President of the Senate "shall, in the presence of the Senate and House pf Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall thenbe counted." Congress has, therefore, no power, under the Constitution, to receive the electoral votes or reject them. The whole power is ex-, haustod when, in thepresence of the two Houses, the votes are counted and the result declared. In this respect the power and duty of the President of the Senate are, under the, Constitution purely ministerial. When, therefore, the joint resolution declares that no electoral votes shall be received or counted from States that, since the 4th of March, 1867, have not "adopted a constitution or State government under which a State government shall have been organized," a power is assumed which is nowhere delegated to Congress, unless upon the assumption that the State governments organized prior to the 4th of March, 1867, were illegal and void.

"The joint resolution, by implication at least, concedes that these States were States by virtue of their organization, prior to the 4th of March, 1867, but denies to them the right to vote in the election of President and Vice President of the United States. It follows either that this assumption of power is wholly unauthorized by the Constitution, or that the States so excluded from voting were out of the Union by reason o( the rebellion, and have never been legitimately restored. Being 'fully satisfied that they were never out of the Union, and that their relations thereto have been legally and constitutionally restored, I am forced to the conclusion that the joint resolution which deprives them of the right to have their vote for President and Vice President received and counted is in conflict with the Constitution, and that Congress has no more power to reject their votes than those ol the States which have been uniformly loyal to the Federal Union.

"It is worthy of remark that if the States whose inhabitants were recently in rebellion were legally and constitutionally organized and restored to their rights prior to the 4th of March, 1867, as I am satisfied they were, the only legitimate authority under which the election for President and Vice President can be held therein must be derived from the governments instituted before that period.

118

"It clearly follows that all the State governments organized in those States under acts of Congress for that purpose, and under military control, are illegitimate and of no validity whatever; and, in that view, the Votes oast in those States for President and Viae President in pursuance of acts passed since the 4th of March, 1867, and in obedience to the so-called reconstruction acts of Congress, cannot be legally received and counted; while the only votes in those States that can be legally cast and counted will be those cast in pursuance of the laws in force in the several States prior to the legislation by Congress upon the subject of reconstruction."

Same day—The bill re-passed the Senate— yeas 45, nays 8, as follow:

Ye.*b—Messrs. Abbott, Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Coie, Codkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Fcssendeti, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Harris, Henderson, Howard, Howe, Kellogg, McDonald, Morgan, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Nye, Osborn, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Bice, Ross, Sherman, Snrague, Stewart, Sumner, Tipton, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Wade, Welch, Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates—45.

Nats—Messrs. Buckalew, Davis, DooHttle, Hendricks, McCreery, Patterson of Tennessee, Vickers, Wkyte—8.

Same day—It passed the House—yeas 134, nays 36; and the Speaker proclaimed it to be a law. The Havs were—

Messrs. Adams, Archer, AxtM, Barnes, Beck, Boyden, Bauer, Brooks, Cary, EMridge, Fox, Getz, Olossbremner, GoUaday, Grover, Haight, Holman, Hotchkiss, Johnson, Thomas L. Jones, Kerr, Knott, Marshall, McCullough, NMaek, A'icholson, Phelps, Randall, Ross, Sitgreavcs, Stone, Taber, Lawrence &. Trimble, Van Auk' a, Wood, Woodward—-36. ,

Proclamation of President Johnson respecting the Ratification of the XlVth Amendment by Florida and North Carolina, July 11, 1868.

Whereas by an act of Congress, entitled "An act to admit the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida to representation in Congress," passed on the 25th of June, 1868, it is declared that it is made the duty of the President within ten days after receiving official information of the ratification by the legislature of either of said States of a proposed amendment to the Constitution known as article XIV, to issue a proclamation announcing that fact;

And whereas the said act seems to be prospective;

And whereas a paper, purporting to be a resolution of the Legislature of Florida, adopting the amendment of the XHIth and XlVth articles of the Constitution of the United States, was received at the Department of State on the 16th of June, 1868, prior to the passage of the act of Congress referred to, which paper is attested by the names of Horatio Jenkins, Jr., as president pro tern- of the Senate, and W. W. Moore as speaker of the Assembly, and of William L. Apthoop as secretary of the Senate, and William Forsyth Bynnm as clerk ofM,he Assembly, and which paper was transmitted to the Secretary of State in a letter dated Executive Office, Tallahassee, Florida, June 10, 1868, from Harrison Reed, who therein signs himself Governor;

And Whereas, on the 6th day of July, 1868, a paper Was received by the President, which paper being addressed to the President, bears

datte of the 4th of July, 1868, and wasi trans', mitted by and under the name of W. W. Holden, who therein writes himself Governor of North Carolina, which paper certifies that the said proposed amendment, known as article XIV, did pass the Senate and House of Representatives of the General Assembly of North Carolina on the second day of July instant, and is attested by the names of John H. Boner or Bower, as secretary of the House of Representatives, and T. A. Byrnes, as secretary of the Senate, and its ratification on the 4th of July, 1868, is attested by Tod R. Caldwell as Lieutenant- Governor, president of Senate, and J. W. Holden as speaker of House of Representatives;

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States of America, in-compliauce with and execution of the act of Congress aforesaid, do issue this proclamation, announcing the fact of the ratification of the said amendment by the Legislature of the State of North Carolina, in the manner hereinbefore set forth.

In testimony whereof I have signed these presents with my hand, and have caused the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, thjs eleyenth day of July, in the year of our Lord P 1 one thousand eight hundred and sixty

I- J eight, and of the Independence of the

United States of America the ninetythird. Amtdrew Johnson. By the President:

Wst. H. Seward,

Secretary of State.

Certificate of Mr. Secretary Seward respecting the Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment #to the Constitution, July 20,1868, William H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States, to all to whom these presents may come, greeting;

Whereas the Congress of the United States, On or about the sixteenth of June, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six, passed a resolution which is in the words and figures following, to wit:

[For text of XlVth Amendment, see page 68 of Manual of 1867, or 194 of the combined Manual.]

And whereas by the second section of the act of Congress, approved the twentieth of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, entitled "An act to provide for the publication of the laws of the United States, and for other purposes," it is made the duty of the Secretary of State forthwith to cause any amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which has been adopted according to the provisions of the said Constitution, to be published in the newspapers authorized to promulgate the laws, with his certifkate specifying the States by which the same may have been adopted, and that the same has become valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of the Constitution of the United States;

And whereas neither the act just quoted from, nor any other law, expressly or by conclusive implication, authorises the Secretary of State t»

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