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TABLE1 6V WHTENTS.

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XXIII. Orders, Letters, Messages, and Votes
in the Senate respecting Secretary Stan-
ton • 1-4

Request for Mr. Stanton's Resignation, and
l;r ply—Secretary Stanton's Suspension, and
Action of the Senate thereon—Action of Gen-
eral Grant—Secretary Stanton's Removal, and
Totes of Senate thereon—Acceptance of Gen-
eral Thomas—Secretary Stanton's Letter " Re-
linquishing Charge," and vote on General Scho-
fleld's Confirmation.';

XXIV. The Articles of Impeachment and Answer—Votes in the House, and Judgment of the Senate •««.;.— 4-22

Vote in .House, November 25,1867—The Final' Effort at Impeachment, and Vote _>f House thereon—Art icles of Impeachment, and Votes thereon—Vote on the Legality of the Court— The Answer of President Johnson—The Replication tbf the House—Progress of the Trial— The Judgment of the Senate.'

XXV. Correspondence between General Grant and President Johnson, growing out of Secretary Stanton's Suspension 22-88

XXVI. Letters! Papers, Testimony, PoliticoMilitary Orders, and Eeport of General Grant 83-66

- General Grant's Orders respecting Slaves, issued in the Field—Letters on Slavery and Reconstruction; on being- a Candidate for Political Office: -on Results of "Peace on nay Terms:" on Filling the Armies; on Protecting Colored Soldiers—His Testimony on the Exchange of Prisoners—Documents on the Proposed Mission to Mexico—On the Baltimore Troubles .of i860—On Martial Law in TexasTestimony- on ReconstrCKttioti—Letters on'

* the Removal of General Sheridan and Secretary Stanton-rHis Orders and Telegrams

• 'to Miliitary Commanders to'the Unrecon

structed States—Report as Secretary of War
ad interim. | . . . ,'.,._

XXVII. Digest of Orders of Military Commanders, and. General Action under the Eeconstruotion Acts 56-65

Orders of General Schofleld. in.the First Mili-
't&ry District—Orders of Generals Sickles and
Canby in the Second Military District—Orders

. . of Generals Pope, Meade, and Swayne in the

third Military Districts-Orders of Generals
Ord, Gillem, and McDowell in the Fourth Mil-
itary District—Orders of Generals Griffin,
Sheridan, Mower, Hancock, and Buchanan, in
the Fifth Military District

XXVIII. Abstracts of new Constitutions--66-75 Of Maryland and New York, of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Mississippi.

XXIX. Supplemental Reconstruction Measures- —•(• **•.^«r+*• •<-»———*•+-:•( 76-81

Act of Julv 19, 186T—Act of March 11, 1888—
The Arkansas Bill—The "Omnibus" Bill-
Votes on all, and on various Propositions made
during their pendency.

XXX. President Johnson's Proclamations and

Orders- 82-86

'Enjoining Obedience to the Constitution and

the Laws—Extending full Pardon to certain
Persons who were engaged in the late Rebel-
lion—Proclaiming a General Amnestv—Order
respecting the Transaction of Public Business
—Correcting an Error in previous Proclama-
tion—Orders respecting Reconstruction.

XXXI. Members of the Cabinet and the 40th
Congress - 87-88

XXXII. Votes on Political Bills and Resolutions 89-92

To continue the Bureau for the relief of Freed-
men and Refugees, offd Total Expenditures
of the Bureau—Xhanks to ex-Seoretary Stan-
ton—Bills inspecting the Supreme Court^Por
the further security of Equal Rights in the
District of Columbia—The Eight-Hour Law.

XXXIII. Political Miscellany 92-96

Votes of State Legislatores on XlVth Amend-' ment—Votes by tho People on proposed Con

. stitfitional Amendments in Michigan, Ohio, Kansas, and Minnesota—President Johnson's Telegram to ex-Governor Parsons on Alabama's Notification of XJVth Amendment— Fraaneia* Legislation authorising the 6's of 1881, tho 5-20is, the 10-40's, the Consolidated Loan of 1865, Legal Timdens, Sinking Fund, and Limiting the amount of " Greenbacks:" '.

XXXIV. National Platforms of 1852, 1856, 1860, and 1864 96-104

Democratio and Whig Platforms of 1852—Re-
publican and Democratic Platforms of 1856,
1860, i«; 1.

XXXV. National Platforms of 1868 104-112

Republican and Democratic Platforms of l»:s,
with the Lett M'Vof Acceptance of Candidates,
and sundry Proceedings of the Conventions.

XXXVI. Statistical Tables—Elections, Revenue, Appropriations, &c - 112-117

Election Reti:rns since 1860, and Electoral Col-
lege—Taxation (State and United States) of Na-
tional Banks—Internal Revenue Receipts of
1867 and 1868—Registration, Disfranchisement,
and Elections in tho Rebel States—Revenue
Receipts since 18*0, and Annual Expenditures-
from 1860 to January; f.869—Expenditures and
Appropriations for fiscal years ending June 30,
1858, June 30, 1866,18U7, and till January 1,1868,
together with Appropriatibns for the year 1869,
and Estimates lor same.

Addenda !:..'.' 118-122

Additional Bill respecting Freedmen's Bu-
reau—The Electoral College Bill, and Presi-
dent Johnson's veto, with the votes on re-pas-
sage—President Johnson's Proclamation on
the Ratification of the XlVth Amendment by
Florida and North Carolina—General' Blair's
Letter to Col. Brodhead—Speeches of Mr. Sey-
mour and General Blair on aacepting their
Nominations—Secretary Seward's certificate
respecting tho ratification of XlVth Amend-
ment—The Funding Bill. It

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ORDERS, LETTERS, MESSAGE AND VOTES IN THE SENATE

RESPECTING SECRETARY STANTON.

Bequest for Mi. Stanton's Resignation and Beply.

1.President Johnson To Secretart Stanton. Executive Mansion, Washington, August 5, 1867. Sir: Public considerations of a high character constrain me to say that your resignation as Secretary of War will be accepted. Very respectfully,

Andrew Johnson. To Hon. Edwin M. Stanton,

Secretary of War.

2.Secretary Stanton To President Johnson. War Department, Washington, August 5, 1867.

Sir: Your note of this day has been received, stating that pablic considerations of a high character constrain you to say that my resignation as Secretary of War will be accepted.

In reply, I have the honor to say that public considerations of a high character, which alone have induced me to continue at the head of this Department, constrain me not to resign the office of Secretary of War before the next meeting of Congress. Very respectfully, yours,

Edwin M. Stanton.

To the President.

Secretary Stanton's Suspension.

3. President Johnson To Secretary Stanton.

Executive Mansion, Washington, August 12, 1867 Sir: By virtue of the power and authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, you are hereby suspended from office as Secretary of War, and •will cease to exercise any and all functions pertaining to the same. You will at once transfer to General Ulysses S. Grant, who has this day been authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, all records, books, papers, and other public property now in your custody and tharge.

Very respectfully, yours,

Andrew Johnson. To Hon. Edwin M Stanton,

Secretary of War,

I.President Johnson To General Grant. , Executive Mansion,

Washington, August 12, 1867. feiR: Thehonorable Edwin M. Stanton having been ihis day suspended as Secretary of War, you are hereby authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, and will at once enter upoh the discharge of the duties of that office.

The Secretary of War has been instructed to transfer to you all records, books, papers, and other public property now in his custody and charge. Very respectfully, yours,

Andrew Johnson. To General Ulysses S. Grant,

Washington, D. C.

5.General Grant To Secretary Stanton. Headers Armies Of The United States,

Washington, D. C, August 12, 1867.

Sir: Enclosed herewith I have the honor to

transmit to you a copy of a letter just received

from the President of the United States, notifying

me of my assignment as Acting Secretary of War,

and directing me to assume those duties at once.

In notifying you of my acceptance, I cannot

let the opportunity pass without expressing to

you my appreciation of the zeal, patriotism,

firmness, and ability with which you have ever

discharged the duties of Secretary of War.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

U. S. Grant, General. To Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War.

6.Secretary Stanton To President Johnson. War Department, Washington City, August 12, 1867. Sir: Your note of this date has been received, informing me that, by virtue of the power and authority vested in you as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, I am suspended from office as Secretary of War, and will cease to exercise any and all functions pertaining to the same, and also directing me at once to transfer to General U. S. Grant, who has this day been authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, all records books, papers, and other public property now in my custody and charge.

Under a sense of public duty I am compelled to deny your right, under the Constitution and laws of the United States, without the advice and consent of the Senate, and without legal cause, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or the exercise of any or all functions pertaining to the same, or without such advice and consent to compel me to transfer to any person the records, books, papers, and public property in my custody as Secretary. But inasmuch as the General commanding the armies of the United States has been appointed ad interim, and has notified me that he has accepted the appointment, I have no alternative but to submit, under protest, to superior force. Very respectfully, yours,

Edwin M. Stanton,
Secretary of War.

To the President.

7.Secretary Stanton To General Geant. War Department, Washington City, August 12, 1867.

General: Your note of this date, accompanied by a copy of a letter addressed to you, August 12, by the President, appointing you Secretary of War ad interim, and informing me of your acceptance of the appointment, has been received.

Under a sense of public .duty I am compelled to deny the President's right, under the Constitution and laws of the United States, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or to authorize any other person to enter upon the discharge of the duties of that office, or to require me to transfer to you or any other person the records, books, papers, and other property in my official custody and charge as Secretary of War.

But, inasmuch as the President has assumed to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, and you have notified me of your acceptance of the appointment of Secretary of War ad interim, I have no alternative but to submit, under protest, to the superior force of the President.

You will please accept my acknowledgment of the kind terms in which you have notified me of your acceptance of the President's appointment, and my cordial reciprocation of the sentiments expressed.

I am, with sincere regard, truly yours, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War.

General Ulysses S. Grant.

Action of the Senate, January 13, 1868.

January 13—The Senate resumed consideration of the following resolution, reported by the Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia, the 10th instant:

Resolved, That having considered the evidence and reasons given by the President in his report of the 12th December, 1867, for the suspension from the office of Secretary of War of Edwin M. Stanton, the Senate do not concur in such suspension.

Which was determined in the affirmative— yeas 35, nays 6, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Fessenden, Fowler, Frelinglmysen, Harlan, Howard, H-we, Morgan, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tlpten, Trumbull, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson—35.

Nats—Messrs. Bayard, Bunkalew, Davis, Dixon, Do-liuUc, Patterson of Tennessee—6.

Not Voting—Messrs. Grimes, Guthrie, Henderson, JTenr dricks, Johnson. Norton, Ross, Saulsbury, Sherman, Sprague, Van Winkle, Vicka-s, Yates—13.

[The National Intelligencer stated, in its news columns, that Messrs. Henderson and Hendricks were paired, and that Mr. Ross, though present, declined to vote.]

Action of General Grant.

Headquarters Armies United States, Washington, D. C, January 14, 1868. Sir: I have the honor to enclose herewith copy of official notice received by me last evening of the action of the Senate of the United States in the case of the suspension of Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. According to the provisions.of section two of "An act regulating the tenure of certain civil offices," my functions as Secretary of War ad interim ceased from the moment of the receipt of the within notice.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. Geant, General. His Excellency A. Johnson,

President of the United States.

Subsequent Action of President Johnson.

1868, February 21—President Johnson sent this message to the Senate:

Washington, D. C, February 21, 1868. To the Senate of the United States:

On the 12th day of August, 1867, by virtue of the power and authority vested in the President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, I suspended Edwin M. Stanton from the office of Secretary of War. In further exercise of the power and authority so vested in the President, I have this day removed Mr. Stanton from the office, and designated the Adjutant General of the Army as Secretary of War ad interim.

Copies of the communications upon this subject, addressed to Mr. Stanton and the Adjutant General, are herewith transmitted for the information of the Senate. Andrew Johnson.

[For copies of these orders, see the first and second Articles of Impeachment.]

Further Proceedings in the Senate.

February 21—Mr. Edmunds submitted the following resolution for consideration:

Resolved, That, having received and considered the communication of the President stating that he had removed from office Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, the Senate disapprove the action of the President.

The Senate, by unanimous consent, proceeded to consider the said resolution.

Mr. Dixon moved to amend the resolution, by striking out all after the word " Resolved," and inserting as follows: That the President be requested to inform the Senate by what authority he" has removed Edwin M. Stanton from the office of Secretary of War.

Mi. Drake moved to amend the amendment of Mr. Dixon, by inserting a preamble, as follows: The Senate having received and considered the communication of the President of the United States, stating that he had removed Edwin M. Stanton from the office of Secretary of War, it is. Which was disagreed to. The amendment of Mr. Dixon was disagreed to—yeas 4, nays 33, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Buckalew, Dixon, DooliiUe, Hendricksi. NAYS-Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler,Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Fessenden, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Henderson, Howard, Howe, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Pattersou of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sprnguo, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates—33.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Cole, Davis, Fowler, Grimes, Johnson, McCreery, Morgan, Morton, Norton, Nye, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Saulst/ury, Sherman, Vickers, Wado—17.

Mr. Chandler moved to amend the resolution of Mr. Edmunds, by adding thereto the words: as a violation of the rights of the Senate, and unauthorized by law. Which was disagreed to. Mr. Wilson moved to amend the resolution, by inserting a preamble, as follows: Whereas the Senate have received and considered the communication of the President of the United States, stating that he had removed Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, and had designated the Adjutant General of the Army to act as Secretary of War ad interim; and by striking out all after the word " Resolved," and inserting, as follows: by the Senate of the United States that, under the Constitution and laws of the United States, the President has no power to remove the Secretary of War and designate any other officer to perform the duties of that office ad interim.

Mr. Yates moved to amend the amendment of Mr. Wilson, by striking out all after the word "Resolved," and inserting, as follows: That the removal of Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, and the appointment of a Secretary of War ad interim, during the session of the Senate, is simple resistance to law and revolutionary in character, and that the Senate disapproves of the same, and advises the said Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, not to surrender the office to any person whomsoever.

Which waB disagreed to. Mr. Corbett moved to amend the amendment of Mr. Wilson, by striking out all after the word "Whereas" in the preamble, and inserting the words: The President has informed the Senate that he has removed the Secretary of War, Hon. E. M. Stanton, and appointed Adjutant General Thomas to act as Secretary of War ad interim, therefore be it; and by striking out all after the word "Resolved," and inserting in lieu thereof the words: That we do not concur in the action of the President in removing the Secretary of War and appointing the Adjutant General to act as Secretary of War ad interim; that we deny the right of the President so to act, under the existing laws, without the consent of the Senate. Which was disagreed to. The amendment of Mr. Wilson to the resolution of Mr. Edmunds was then agreed to—yeas ,23, nays 6, as follow:

Ybas—Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Cole, Conkllng, Cragin, Drake, Ferry, Harlan, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Patterson of New Hampshire Pomeroy, RamBey,Ross, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates—28.

Naus—Messrs. Buckalew, Davis, Doolittle, Edmonds, Hendricks, Patterson of Tennessee—6.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Chandler, Conness, Corbett, Dixon, Fessenden, Fowler, Frelinghuysen, Grimes, Henderson, Howard, Howe, Johnson, McCreery, Morgan, Norton, Nye, Saulsbury, Sherman, Vickers—20.

The resolution, as amended, was then agreed to without a division.

Acceptance of General; Lorenzo Thomas. [ War Department, Adjutant Generabs Office, Washington, February 21, 1868. His Excellency Andrew Johnson, President of the United States.

Sir: I have the honor to report that I have delivered the communication addressed by you to the honorable Edwin M. Stanton, removing him from the office of Secretary of the War Department, and also to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date authorizing and empowering me to act as Secretary of War ad interim, i accept this appointment with gratitude for the confidence reposed in me, and will endeavor to discharge the duties to the best of my ability.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, L. Thomas, Adjutant General.

Secretary Stanton "Relinquished Charge" of the War Department. Secretary Stanton remained in possession of the War Office till after the vote in the Senate, sitting as a court of impeachment, on the 26th of May, on which day he addressed this communication to President Johnson:

War Department, Washington City, May 26, 1868.

Sir: The resolution of the Senate of the United States, of the 21st of February last, declaring that the President " has no power to remove the Secretary of War and designate any other officer to perform the duties of that office ad interim," having this day failed to be supported by two-thirds of the Senators present and voting on the articles of impeachment preferred against you by the House of Representatives, I nave relinquished charge of the War Department, and have left the same, and the books, archives, papers, and property, heretofore in my custody as Secretary of War, in care of Brevet Major General Townsend, the tehior Assistant Adjutant General, subject to your direction. Edwin M. Stanton,

Secretary of Wotr.

To the President of the United States.

Secretary Stanton's order to Gen. Townsend is as follows:

War Department, Washington City, May 26, 1868. General: You will take charge of the War Department, and the books and papers, archive! and public property, belonging to the same, sub

ject to the disposal and direction of the President. Edwin M. Stanton,

Secretary of War. Brevet Major Gen. E. D. Townsend,

Assistant Adjutant General.

Action of the Senate upon the Nomination of General Schofieid.

1868, May 29—Mr. Edmunds offered the following preamble and resolution:

Whereas, on the 23d of April, 1868, the President nominated John M. Schofieid to be Secretary of War, in place of Edwin M. Stanton, removed; and whereas, in the opinion of the Senate, the said Stanton has not been legally removed from his office, but inasmuch as the said Stanton has relin■ quished his place as Secretary of War, for causes stated in his note to the President: Therefore

Resolved, That the Senate advise and consent to the appointment of John M. Schofieid to be Secretary of War.

Mr. Willey moved to amend Mr. Edmunds's resolution, by striking out all after " Resolved," and inserting That the Senate advise and consent to the appointment of John M. Schofieid to be Secretary for the Department of War, in the place of Edwin M. Stanton, hereby removed.

Which was debated and withdrawn bv him.

Mr. Frelinghuysen moved to amend Mr. Edmunds's resolution, by striking out all after " Resolved," and inserting That the Senate advise and consent to the appointment of John M. Schofieid to be Secretary for the Department of War, in the place of Edwin M. Stanton, who has relinquished that office.

Mr. Henderson moved to amend the amendment of Mr. Frelinghuysen, by striking out the words " in the place of Edwin M. Stanton, who has relinquished that office."

Which was rejected.

Mr. Stewart moved to amend Mr. Frelinghuysen's amendment, by striking out all after "Resolved," and inserting That the Senate advise and consent to the appointment of John M. Schofieid as Secretary of War, in place of Edwin M. Stanton, who has been forced to retire from the discharge of the duties of said office by reason

of the illegal and tinconslitutional acts of the President of the United States.

Which was rejected—yeas 19, nays 21, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Cameron, Cattell, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Cragin, Drake, Morrill of Vermont, Patterson of New Hum psliire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Williams, Wilson, Yates—19.

Nats—Messrs. Anthony, Buckalew, Corbett, Dwlittle, Kdmunds, Fowler, Frelinghuysen, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Morgan, Morton, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Sprague, Trumbull, Van Winkle, VickcrsWilley—21.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Chandler, Davis, Dixon, Ferry, Fessenden, Qrimes, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Morrill of Mnine, Nye, Saulsbury, Sherman—14.

The amendment of Mr. Frelinghuysen was then rejected—yeas 15, nays 22, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Buckalew, Corbett, Doolittlc, Fowler, Frelinghuysen, Hendricks, Johnson, McCrecry, Norton, Patterson of Tenuessee, Ross, Sprague, Tipton, Van Winkle, flickers—15.

Nats—Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Crnidn, Drake, Edmunds, Morgan, Morton, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates—22.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Chandler, Davis, Dixon, Ferry, Fessenden, Grimes, Harlan, Henderson, Howard, Howe, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Nye, Saulsbury, Sherman, Trumbull—17.

The resolution offered by Mr. Edmunds was then agreed to—yeas 35, nays 2, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Anthony, Buckalew, Cameron, Cattell,Colet Conness, Corbett, Doolittle, Drake, Edmunds, Fowler, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Henderson, Hendricks,Johnson, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Patterson of New Hampshire, Patterson of Tennessee, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Ross, Sprague, Stewart. Thayer, Tipton, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Yickerst Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates—35.

Nays—Messrs. McCreery, Norton—2.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Chandler, Conkling, Cragin, Davis, Dixon, Ferry, Fessenden, Grimes, Howard, Howe, Morrill of Maine, Nye, Saulsbury, Sherman, Sumner, Wade —17.

The preamble was then agreed to—yeas 28, nays 13, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell,Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson, Yates— 28.

NaysBuckalew, Doolittle, Fowler, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Koss, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Vickers—13.

Not Voting—Messrs. Bayard, Chandler, Davis, Dixon, Ferry, Fessendon, Grimes, Howard, Howe, Morrill of Maine, Nye, Saulsbury, Sherman—13.

XXIV.

THE ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT AND REPLY,

VOTES IN THE HOUSE, AND JUDGMENT OF THE SENATE.

Proposed Impeachment of President Johnson.*

1867, November 25—Mr. Boutwell, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted a report, representing the views of the majority, (Messrs. Boutwell, i'homas, Williams, Lawrence, and Churchill,) and closing with this resolution:

* Continued from page 64 of the Manual of 1897, or page 190 of tho combined Manuals. [No report was made ut the July session.]

Resolved, That Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, be impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors.

Mr. Wilson, for himself and Mr. Woodbridge, and Mr. Marshall, for himself and Mr. Eldridge, submitted minority reports.

December 7—The resolution above recited was disagreed to—yeas 57, nays 108, as follow:

Yeas—Messrs. Anderson, Arnell, J. M. Ashley, Boutwell, Bromwell, llroomall, Benjamin F. Butler, Churchill, Reader

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