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less only, but sweet and attractive, by the habitual exercise of all those benevolent virtues which characterized and adorned his mild and gentle nature. And while he pursued with diligence every line of study which might serve to make him at once a blessing and an ornament to society, he looked steadily beyond this transient scene, knowing that this world is but a school of preparation for that eternity upon which his soul rested with undoubting faith. I think the outlines of his character may be sketched in a very few words. He was a ripe scholar; an able lawyer, as you, his brethren, must know; a bland and amiable gentleman; a strict moralist; a virtuous man; and, above all, a modest and unobtrusive Christian philosopher. It is not for us to judge of his final condition; but, as feeling and thinking men, when we view the spotless morality of his life, and the quiet meekness of his piety, we have good reason to hope that, even now, he is enjoying the rich reward of a well spent life, in blissful communion with the spirits of the just made perfect. This much, at least, we do know, that his life has been a blessing to many individuals and a great benefit to his country, and that, dying in honored old age, he has left behind him the sweet savor of a good name.

The Attorney General concluded by moving that the proceedings of the bar meeting referred to in his address be entered on the minutes of the court, and read the proceedings, as follows:

At a meeting of the members of the bar and officers of the Supreme Court of the United States, held in the room of the Supreme Court on Monday, the 2d day of December, in the year 1861, to adopt measures to testify their high appreciation. of the character and public services of the late JoHN MCLEAN, the senior Associate Justice of said court, Richard S. Coxe, Esq., on behalf of the committee appointed for that purpose, submitted the following

Resolutions.

1. That the members of this bar and the officers of the court entertain a profound sense of the loss which, in common with the entire nation, they have sustained in the death of the late

Mr. Justice MCLEAN, so long known to the community, and in an especial manner to the profession, for his exalted legal accomplishments, the purity of his private character, and the eminent ability with which he discharged the duties of the high offices, judicial, administrative, and legislative, with which his name has been so long and honorably associated. 2. That we will wear the accustomed badge of mourning during the present term of the court.

3. That the Chairman and Secretary of this meeting transmit a copy of these proceedings to the family of the deceased, communicating, at the same time, the deep and sincere sympathy felt by its members in the affliction with which they have been visited by a wise and merciful Providence.

4. That the Honorable the Attorney General be respectfully solicited to present these proceedings to the Supreme Court, now in session, and to ask that they may be entered on the minutes of the court.

Mr. Chief Justice TANEY replied as follows:

The members of the court unite with the bar in sincere sorrow for the death of the late Mr. Justice MCLEAN. IIe held a seat on this bench for more that thirty years, and until the last two years of his life, when his health began to fail, was never absent from his duties here for a single day. His best eulogy will be found in the reports of the decisions of this court during that long period of judicial life, and these reports will show the prominent part he took in the many great and important questions which from time to time have come before the court, and the earnestness and ability with which he investigated and discussed them.

They are the recorded evidence of a mind, firm, frank and vigorous, and full of the subject before him at the time.

Before he occupied a seat on this bench, he filled the office of Postmaster General of the United States; and in that post displayed an administrative talent hardly ever surpassed, with a firmness of character, and uprightness of purpose never questioned. Words of eulogy are hardly needed in memory of one so widely known and respected, eminent in political as well as judicial life.

We deplore his loss, and join the members of the bar in pay

ing due honor to his memory, and direct the motion of the Attorney General and the resolutions of the bar in relation to our deceased brother to be placed on record with this response from the court; and, as a mark of respect, we will adjourn to-day without transacting any of the ordinary business of the

court.

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ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS.

D. W. GOOCH,

W. II. Y. HACKETT,
E. C. INGERSOLL,
GEORGE B. CORKHILL,
JOHN N. WHITING,
BENJAMIN F. RUSSELL,
WILLIAM B. PERRINE,
WILLIAM BOND,
LEWIS TAYLOR,
THADDEUS H. LANE,
TIMOTHY O. HOWE,
D. L. FOLLETT,
HENRY B. FERNARD,

J. B. S. TODD,
RICHARD GOODMAN,
S. B. GOOKINS,
E. II. OWEN,

THOMAS M. EDWARDS,
GEORGE M. CONARROE,
F. E. BISSELL,
CHARLES EAMES,
MARK B. MOORE,
SAMUEL WELLS,
W. II. F. GURLEY,

MORTON S. WILKINSON,

JACKSON GRIMSHAW,

ADDISON L. SCOTT,

LEVIN GALE,

ALEXANDER EVANS,

JABEZ R. WARD,

BENJAMIN F. REXFORD,

C. M. HAWLEY,

THEODORE J. WIDVEY,
J. LAWRENCE SMITH,

MATTHEW H. CARPENTER,

JAMES ABRAMS,

B. K. MILLER,

TIMOTHY CRONIN,

HIRAM B. CROSBY,

JAMES J. LINDLEY,

Massachusetts. New Hampshire. Illinois.

Iowa.

New York.
Massachusetts.
Maryland.
New York.
Pennsylvania.
New York.
Wisconsin.

New York.
Massachusetts.

Dakota Territory.
New York.
Indiana.

New York.
New Hampshire.
Pennsylvania.
Iowa.

District of Columbia.
New York.

Massachusetts.

Iowa.

Minnesota.

Illinois.

New York.

Maryland.

Maryland.

New York.

New York.

Illinois.

Wisconsin.

New York.

Wisconsin.

Wisconsin.

New York.

New York. Connecticut. Iowa.

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