Dollar Diplomacy;: A Study in American Imperialism,

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B. W. Huebsch and the Viking Press, 1925 - 353 páginas
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Contenido

Political Implications of Economic Imperialism
17
ECONOMIC PENETRATION 19 1 The Opening Wedge of Imperialism
19
Financing a New Civilization
20
The Growing Canadian Demand for Capital 4 British Bankers Supply the First Canadian Capital
21
United States Investors Enter the Field
22
The Effects of the
23
Nationality of Canadian Capital
25
Canadian Bond Sales
26
Branch Plants in Canada
27
The Technique of Peaceful Economic Penetration
28
Economic Penetration Under Government Control
29
The Bolivian Loan of 1922
30
The Fiscal Commission
33
Economic Penetration and Political Interference
34
Manchuria
36
The Open Door Policy
37
The Boxer Rebellion
38
The Manchurian Bank Project
40
The Battle for Manchurian Railways
42
ChinchowAigun Railway Concession 1909
45
The Six Power Loan
48
The New Consortium
55
China as an American Sphere of Influence
60
The Near East Sphere of Influence
66
The Struggle for
69
An International Trust
73
POLITICAL REGULATION 1 Economic and Strategic Bases 2 The Hawaiian Revolution of 1893
74
Mexico Diaz and
84
Huerta and British
90
Washington Backs American Oil 7 Woodrow Wilson versus Huerta
92
President Wilson Intervenes
93
The Tampico Flag Incident
100
The Capture of Vera Cruz
105
Ordering a Government for Mexico
108
American Oil Backs Carranza
111
Confiscation and the Constitution of 1917
113
Oil Producers versus Mexico 16 CounterRevolution in the Oil Fields
117
Mexican Policy from 1910 to 1919
119
Political Domination of Weak Nations
120
ARMED INTERVENTION 122 1 The Strategic Importance of the Caribbean Area to the United States
122
The Financial Conquest of Santo Domingo
124
Armed Political Control
128
American Bankers and Armed Intervention
130
The Military Conquest of Haiti
133
Enter the National City Bank
134
The Marines Take Possession
137
Martial Law in Haiti
139
The Treaty
141
The Military Occupation
144
The Nicaraguan Protectorate
151
The Platt Amendment
176
Second Military Occupation
179
The Third Landing of Troops
181
The Fourth Landing of Troops
183
The Civil Occupation of Cuba
185
The Economic Occupation of Cuba
189
CONQUEST AND PURCHASE 195 1 From Economic Expansion to Political Sovereignty
195
The Philippine Republic
198
Cooperating with Aguinaldo 4 Disposing of the Philippines
199
Pacification and the Civil Government
201
Growing American Interests
203
The WoodForbes Report
204
The Virgin IslandsA Strategic
209
Purchasing the Islands
212
Naval Rule
214
Summarizing Imperial Policy
219
WAR DEBTS AND SETTLEMENTS 221 1 War Debts and Financial Imperialism
221
War Mortgages
222
United States Claims against European Governments 4 The British Debt Settlement
223
Stripping Economic Rivals
225
A Technique of Exploitation
227
The Principles of World Subjugation
231
THE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN IMPERIAL DIPLOMACY
233
The Monroe Doctrine
238
Early Applications of the Monroe Doctrine 4 Commercial Diplomacy
242
The Dawn of Modern Imperial Diplomacy
244
The FarFlung Battle Line
248
An Oriental Power
252
Manifest Destiny
255
The Open Door Doctrine
258
Protectorates
260
The Big Stick
261
The American Gibraltar
263
Dollar Diplomacy
264
Oil and Intervention
267
The State Department as a Business Solicitor
271
APPENDICES
281
Territorial Expansion of the United States since 1898
283
Memorandum respecting Manchuria 1902
284
RootTakahira Agreement 1908
285
LansingIshii Agreement 1917
287
China Consortium Agreement full text 1920
294
A Mexican Oil Concession Diaz Regime 1908
306
The Dominican Treaty of 1907
312
The Haitian Treaty of 1915
316
The Nicaraguan Treaty of 1916
321
Brown Brothers Contract with Nicaragua 1920
324
BIBLIOGRAPHY
333
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Página 236 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its Powers...
Página 174 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Página 175 - That the Government of Cuba shall never enter into any treaty or other compact with any foreign power or powers which will impair or tend to impair the independence of Cuba, nor in any manner authorize or permit any foreign power or powers to obtain by colonization or for military or naval purposes or otherwise lodgment in or control over any portion of said island.
Página 39 - It is, of course, too early to forecast the means of attaining this last result; but the policy of the Government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire.
Página 296 - Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall remain deposited in the archives of the Government of the United States of America. Duly certified copies thereof shall be transmitted by that Government to the Governments of the other signatory states. IN FAITH WHEREOF the representatives of the Governments of the United Nations have signed the present Charter.
Página 261 - Chronic wrongdoing, or an impotence which results in a general loosening of the ties of civilized society, may in America, as elsewhere, ultimately require intervention by some civilized nation, and in the Western Hemisphere the adherence of the United States to the Monroe Doctrine may force the United States, however reluctantly, in flagrant cases of such wrongdoing or impotence, to the exercise of an international police power.
Página 38 - free ports"), no matter to what nationality it may belong, and that duties so leviable shall be collected by the Chinese government. Third, that it will levy no higher harbor dues on vessels of another nationality frequenting any port in such "sphere...
Página 201 - We regard ourselves as trustees acting not for the advantage of the United States, but for the benefit of the people of the Philippine Islands. "Every step we take will be taken with a view to the ultimate independence of the Islands and as a preparation for that independence.
Página 38 - That it will levy no higher harbor dues on vessels of another nationality frequenting any port in such " sphere " than shall be levied on vessels of its own nationality, and no higher railroad charges over lines built, controlled, or operated within its
Página 200 - The information which has come to the President since your departure convinces him that the acceptance of the cession of Luzon alone, leaving the rest of the islands subject to Spanish rule, or to be the subject of future contention, cannot be justified on political, commercial, or humanitarian grounds. The cession must be of the whole archipelago or none. The latter is wholly inadmissible, and the former must therefore be required.

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