Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

II.-"General Orders; No. 8, of January 20, 1863, from the Headquarters Army of the Potomac, dismissing 1st Lieutenant Henry P. Kinney, 24th Michigan Volunteers, for tendering his resignation while under orders to meet the enemy, and expressing in his resignation unsoldierlike and treasonable sentiments, is, by direction of the President, hereby confirmed.

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

General Orders, }

No. 24.

WAR DEP'T, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, January 29, 1863.

Paragraph 1142, page 168, General Regulations for the Army, is revised so that the last sentence shall read as follows: Copies of the telegrams must accompany vouchers for their payment where they can be procured. If the copies cannot be procured, the account may be paid by a Quartermaster upon the certificate of the Commanding General of the Department, or the Commanding Officer of the post, showing that the telegrams were on public business, and that the matter demanded this mode of communication. BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

[ocr errors]

General Orders,

No. 25.

}

WAR DEP'T, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE. Washington, January 29, 1863. The Secretary of War with great regret announces the decease of another veteran offi cer, Colonel JOHN J. ABERT, late Chief of the United States Corps of Topographical Engineers, who died at his residence in this city, the 27th instant, at an advanced age. Colonel Abert entered as a cadet of the Military Academy in the year 1808, only six years after its first establishment by law. Leaving the Academy in 1811, he was from then until November, 1814, employed in the War Office. While thus engaged, he volunteered as a private soldier for the defense of the Capital; and his services on that occasion were acknowledged by conferring upon him a land warrant, under the existing laws. He was appointed Topographical Engineer, with rank of Major, November 22, 1814. At that time there was no organized corps of those officers, but they formed a part of the General Staff, and served with generals in the field. After the close of the war they were employed in surveys of the sea-coast and inland frontiers, reporting to the Chief of Engineers; and the results of their labors were collected in a Topographical Bureau, established in the War Department May 5, 1820, as a part of the Engineer Department, under charge of Major Roberdeau. On the reorganization of the Army in 1816, Major Abert was retained. In 1824 he was brevetted Lieutenant Colonel for ten years' faithful service in one grade; and at the death of Colonel Roberdeau, February 12, 1829, he was appointed to the charge of the Topographical Bureau. As the duties of his Bureau increased in magnitude and importance, Colonel Abert exerted himself to cause it to be made a distinct branch of the War Department, which he effected June 22, 1831. At this time his corps consisted of six majors and four captains by brevet, and six civil engineers; besides which some twenty subalterns of the line of the Army were detailed on topographical duty under his orders. At length, by act of Congress approved July 7, 1838, the present Corps of Topographical Engineers was organized and created one of the Staff Corps of the Army, with the officer to whose fostering care and judicious management it mainly owed its existence, for its colonel and chief. Colonel Abert was, in fact, at the head of his corps for upwards of thirty-two years, until he was honorably retired from active duty the 11th September, 1861, having become incapacitated by long and faithful service from further attendance at his office.

The Army and the country will not need to be reminded of the vast interest and value attached to the operations of this corps since its organization. The geographical and other information concerning this continent which its officers have collected and published, has challenged the admiration of the scientific world; while the practical benefit of their labors has been felt in nearly every State and every Territory; the whole forming a proud monument to him who was its founder.

As a citizen and a man, Colonel Abert was remarkable for the steadfastness of his

friendships, for his candor and unostentatious hospitality. Equally unostentatious, but no less sincere, was the simple piety which supported his declining years, and left behind an example which the proudest soldier may not be ashamed to follow.

In respect to his memory, the officers of Topographical Engineers will wear the badge of mourning for thirty days.

[blocks in formation]

The district of country north of the Potomac river from Piscataway creek to Annapolis Junction, and the mouth of the Monocacy; and south by Goose creek and Bull Run mountain, to the mouth of the Occaquan, will constitute the Department of WASHINGTON, and troops in that Department will constitute the Twenty-second Army Corps; to be commanded by Major General HEINTZelman.

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

General Orders,

No. 27.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

WAR DEP'T, Adjutant GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Washington, February 2, 1863.

I.-The following officers having been detected in forwarding to the North stolen property belonging to the United States, are, by direction of the President, dishonorably dismissed the service:

Colonel L. P. Cesnola, 4th New York Cavalry.

Surgeon T. M. Hill, 27th Connecticut Volunteers.

III-By direction of the President, Captain J. P. Foley, Assistant Adjutant General U. S. Volunteers, is hereby dismissed the service for having been taken prisoner and paroled while straggling on the march; an offence which it was his duty as an officer to correct in others, instead of committing himself.

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

General Orders,

No. 28.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

WAR DEP'T, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, February 3, 1863.

At a Military Commission, which convened at Yorktown, Virginia, the 18th of October, 1862, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 131, dated October 10, 1862, from the Headquarters of the 4th Army Corps, Yorktown, Virginia, and of which Brigadier General HENRY M. NAGLEE, U. S. Volunteers, was President, were arraigned and tried — 1st. Private William Dormody, Battery H, 1st Pennsylvania Artillery. CHARGE 1st.-"Quitting his post to plunder and pillage."

Specification 1st-" In this; that Private William Dormody, Battery H, 1st Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, did, on the fifth day of September, A. D. 1862, quit his post for the purpose of plundering and pillaging the citizens of the United States in the county of [York] Virginia. This at the post of his Battery, near Yorktown, Virginia." CHARGE 2d." Assault with intent to kill."

Specification-"In this; that Private William Dormody, Battery H, 1st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery aforesaid, did, on the fifth day of September, A. D. 1862, offer violence to the person of one Hezekiah Stokes, of York county, Virginia, a citizen of the United States, while in the peaceful pursuit of his lawful occupation, and did strike, beat, and stab the said Stokes, with intent to kill the said Stokes, of which violence the said Stokes did thereafter die. This at the camp of his Battery, at Yorktown, Virginia."

CHARGE 3d.-"Murder."

Specification 1st-"In this; that he, Private William Dormody of Battery H, 1st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery aforesaid, did, on the 5th day of September,

A. D. 1862, with clubs, pistols, and knives, beat, shoot and stab one Hezekiah Stokes, of York county, Virginia, a citizen of the United States, while in the peaceful pursuit of his lawful occupation, and of his own malice did him violence, of which violence the said Stokes did thereafter die."

Specification 2d-"In this; that Private William Dormody aforesaid, on the 5th day of September, A. D. 1862, while divers malicious persons were assaulting, with clubs, pistols, and knives, Hezekiah Stokes aforesaid, and doing him great personal violence, was present aiding, abetting, and assaulting the same, of which violence the said Stokes did thereafter die. This near the camp of the said William Dormody, at Yorktown, Virginia."

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded as follows:

To Specification, 1st Charge, "Not Guilty."

To the 1st CHARGE, "Guilty," as far as leaving camp without permission; but not for plunder.

[blocks in formation]

The Court, after mature deliberation upon the evidence adduced, finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the Specification 1st Charge, "Guilty," so far as leaving camp without permission. Of the 1st CHARGE, Guilty," so far as leaving camp without permission.

Of the Specification, 2d Charge, “Not Guilty."

Of the 24 CHARGE, "Not Guilty."

Of the 1st Specification, 3d Charge, "Not Guilty."

Of the 24 Specification, 3d Charge, "Guilty."

Of the 3d CHARGE, "Guilty."

[blocks in formation]

And the Court does therefore sentence him, the said Private William Dormody, Battery H, 1st Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, "To be hung by the neck until he is dead, at such time and place as the proper authorities may select.”

2d. Private Charles Clarke, Battery II, 1st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery. CHARGE 1st." Quitting his post to plunder and pillage."

Specification-“In this; that Private Charles Clarke, Battery H, 1st Regiment Volunteer Pennsylvania Artillery, did, on the fifth day of September, A. D. 1862, quit his post for the purpose of plundering and pillaging the citizens of the United States in the county of York, Virginia. This at the post of his Battery, near Yorktown, Virginia." CHARGE 2d." Assault with intent to kill."

W

W

Specification- In this; that Private Charles Clarke, Battery H, 1st Regiment Perasylvania Volunteer Artillery aforesaid, did, on the 5th day of September, A. D. 1862, offer violence to the person of one Hezekiah Stokes, of York county, Virginia, a citizen of the United States, while in the peaceful pursuit of his lawful occupation, and did strike, beat, and stab the said Stokes, with intent to kill the said Stokes, of which violence the said Stokes did thereafter die. This near the camp of his Battery, at Yorktown, Virginia."

CHARGE 3d.“ Murder.”

Specification 1st-"In this; that Private Charles Clarke, Battery H, 1st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery aforesaid, did, on the 5th day of September, A. D. 1562, with clubs, pistols, and knives, beat, shot, and stab one Hezekiah Stokes, of York county, Virginia, a citizen of the United States, while in the peaceful pursuit of his lawful occupation, and of his own malice did him violence, of which violence the sail Stokes did thereafter die."

Specific ition 24-In this; that Private Charles Clarke, Battery H, 1st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery aforesaid, on the 5th day of September, A. D. 1862, while divers malicious persons were assaulting, with clubs and pistols and knives Hezekiah Stokes aforesaid, and doing him great personal violence, was present aiding. abetting, and assisting the same, of which violence the said Stokes did thereafter die. This near the camp of the said Charles Clarke at Yorktown, Virginia."

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded as follows:

To the Specification, 1st Charge, "Not Guilty."

To the 1st CHARGE, "Not Guilty."

To the Specification, 2d Charge," Not Guilty."
To the 2d CHARGE, "Not Guilty."

To the 1st Specification, 3d Charge,

"Not Guilty."

To the 2d Specification, 3d Charge, "Not Guilty.”
To the 3d CHARGE, “Not Guilty.”

[blocks in formation]

The Court, after mature deliberation upon the evidence adduced, finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the Specification of 1st Charge, "Guilty of quitting his post, though the purpose named in the charge (plunder and pillage) is not proven."

Of the 1st CHARGE, "Guilty of quitting his post."

Of the Specification, 2d Charge, "Guilty, excepting the word 'stabbed.'"

Of the 24 CHARGE, "Guilty."

Of the 1st Specification, 3d Charge, "Guilty, excepting the words 'knives, shoot, and stab.'"

Of the 2d Specification, 3d Charge, "Guilty."

Of the 3d CHARGE, “Guilty."

[blocks in formation]

And the Court does therefore sentence him, the said Charles Clarke, Battery H, 1st Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, "To be hung by the neck until he is dead, at such time and place as the proper authorities may select."

IL-In compliance with the 5th section of the act approved July 17, 1862, the proceedings in the cases of Privates William Dormody and Charles Clarke have been submitted to the President of the United States, and the sentences are by him approved, and will be executed under the orders of Major General Dix, commanding the Department of Virginia.

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

General Orders,}

No. 29.

War Dep't, Adjutant GeneRAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, February 4, 1863.

At a General Court Martial which convened at the Headquarters of the 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 2d Corps, Army of the Potomac, near Falmouth, Virginia, on the 17th day of January, 1863, pursuant to General Orders, No. 13, dated the 17th January, 1863, from the Headquarters 2d Division, 2d Corps, Army of the Potomac, and of which Lieutenant Colonel CURRY, 106th Pennsylvania Volunteers, was President, was arraigned and tried1st Lieutenant Joseph Nichols, 19th Maine Volunteers.

CHARGE 1st.-Conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline." Specification-"In this; that he, the said Joseph Nichols, 1st Lieutenant Co. C, 19th Maine Volunteers, did tender his resignation while near the enemy, under an allegation or pretext of the inexpediency and unconstitutionality of a proclamation of the President of the United States; thereby affording an example deeply inju rions to the service, and meddling with the war policy of the Government, with which he has nothing to do."

CHARGE 2d.-" Disloyalty to the Government." Specification "In this; that he, the said Joseph Nichols, 1st Lieutenant Co. C, 19th Maine Volunteers, entertains ideas in opposition to the Government, expressing his belief of the inexpediency and unconstitutionality of one of its leading measures, and stating further that he cannot serve conscientiously and zealously under it, the said measure being expressly intended to weaken the enemies of the United States. All this at camp near Falmouth, on or about the 12th of January, 1863." To which charges and specifications the accused pleaded as follows: To the Specification, 1st Charge, "Not Guilty."

To the 1st CHARGE, " Not Guilty."

[blocks in formation]

The Court, after mature deliberation upon the evidence adduced, finds the accused as follows:

Of the Specification, 1st Charge, "Guilty," except the words "and meddling with the war policy of the government, with which he has nothing to do."

Of the 1st CHARGE, " Guilty."

Of the Specification, 2d Charge, "Guilty," except the words, "the said measure being expressly intended to weaken tlie enemies of the United States."

Of the 2d CHARGE, "Not Guilty."

SENTENCE.

And the Court does therefore sentence him, the said First Lieutenant Joseph Nichols, 19th Maine Volunteers," To be dismissed the service of the United States, receiving his pay and allowances."

II. This officer tendered his resignation when in front of the enemy, on the ground that he regarded the President's Emancipation Proclamation as inexpedient and unconstitutional, and in consequence could not conscientiously serve under it. He was tried under charges of disloyalty and of conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, and was sentenced to be dismissed with his pay and allowances. The sentence was disapproved by Major Generals Couch and Sumner as too lenient, and the latter" nestly recommends that this officer shall be dishonorably dismissed the service, with the loss of all pay and allowances."

ear

By direction of the President, the above recommendation is approved, and will be immediately carried into effect.

[blocks in formation]

Paragraph 1341, General Regulations, and "General Orders," No. 86, of July 23, 1862, paragraph IV., are hereby modified so as to require that applications for payment in cases where certificates of discharge or final statements are lost or destroyed, shall be made to the Second Auditor of the Treasury instead of the Second Comptroller. BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

General Orders,

No. 31.

War Dep't, Adjutant GeneRAL'S OFFICE,
Washington, February 4, 1863.

I. So much of "General Orders," No. 195, of November 24, 1862, as dismisses Lieutenant Colonel F. C. Crutchmar, (Kretschmar,) 103d New York Volunteers, is hereby revoked.

II. The "General Orders," No. 11, from Headquarters Thirteenth Army Corps, dated November 26, 1862, dismissing 2d Lieutenant Addison L. Page, 30th Illinois Volunteers, with foreiture of all pay and allowances due him, is, by direction of the President, hereby confirmed, the said Page having been found guilty, by a General Court Martial, of "forgery, bribery and corruption, and conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.

General Orders,

No. 32.

WAR DEP'T, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, February 4, 1863.

At a General Court Martial, which convened at the Headquarters of the 19th Massachusetts Volunteers, near Falmouth, Virginia, on the 5th day of January, 1863, pursuant

« AnteriorContinuar »