The Epochs of International Law

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Walter de Gruyter, 2000 - 780 páginas

Wilhelm G. Grewe's "Epochen der Völkerrechtsgeschichte", published in 1984, is widely regarded as one of the classic twentieth century works of international law. This revised translation by Michael Byers of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, makes this important book available to non-German readers for the first time.

"The Epocs of International Law" provides a theoretical overview and detailed analysis of the history of international law from the Middle Ages, to the Age of Discovery and the Thirty Years War, from Napoleon Bonaparte to the Treaty of Versailles, the Cold War and the Age of the Single Superpower, and does so in a way that reflects Grewe's own experience as one of Germany's leading diplomats and professors of international law.

A new chapter, written by Wilhelm G. Grewe and Michael Byers, updates the book to October 1998, making the revised translation of interest to German international layers, international relations scholars and historians as well.

Wilhelm G. Grewe was one of Germany's leading diplomats, serving as West German ambassador to Washington, Tokyo and NATO, and was a member of the International Court of Arbitration in The Hague. Subsequently professor of International Law at the University of Freiburg, he remains one of Germany's most famous academic lawyers. Wilhelm G. Grewe died in January 2000.

Professor Dr. Michael Byers, Duke University, School of Law, Durham, North Carolina, formerly a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, and a visiting Fellow of the Max-Planck-Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg.

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Contenido

Introduction
1
The Origins of the Law of Nations
7
International Legal Orders of the Modern State System
13
PART ONE Ius gentium
35
Political and Territorial Subdivision
48
Openness
67
Natural Law and Treaty Practice
83
War and Feud
105
The Adversary as a Criminal
422
Chapter One British Predominance in the State System
429
The Age of Bismarck 18711890
438
The WorldWide State System and Global Equilibrium
458
The Legal Institutions of the New Colonial Law of Nations
467
Codification Conferences
512
Continental and British Conceptions of War
534
The Naval Forces of Rebels
569

The Real Face of War
113
PART TWO Ius inter gentes
136
The Shape of the Early Modern State
171
Religious Intervention
177
Sovereigns as Treaty Partners
196
Changes in the Just War Doctrine
203
Chapter Eight The Institutions of the Law of Nations
229
Discovery as a Title for the Acquisition of Colonial Territories
250
PART THREE Droit Public de lEurope
277
The Wider System of the European Balance of Power
294
Political Intervention in the Name of Balance of Power
332
The Recognition of
343
The Practice of Concluding Treaties in
360
Neutral Rights in Wartime as liberté des mers
403
Freedom of the Seas as the Freedom of Neutral Trade in War
410
Nation and Sovereignity as Central Concepts
416
Chapter One The Transition Period of the
575
Compulsory Arbitration
611
LongDistance Blockade and Economic Warfare
634
The Power and Impotence of the Superpowers
640
A Universal Legal Community Rising Above Ideological Dissent
646
Antagonism between SupraNational Integration
652
Preeminence of Political Rather than
667
Wars of Liberation and Other Interpretations of
680
Epilogue An International Community with a Single Superpower
701
A Heterogeneous Multitude
706
The Changing Emphasis of Codification
712
War Civil War Internal Anarchy
718
Bibliography
727
Sources of Illustrations
761
Subject Index
773
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