Citizen Lincoln

Portada
Nova Publishers, 2004 - 229 páginas
In modern times, some critics have belittled Abraham Lincoln's antislavery resolve as shallow. Some have portrayed him as a passive president, waiting upon the bold initiatives of others. 'Citizen Lincoln' regards him differently. First, it portrays Lincoln's animus against slavery as rooted in the highest ideals of the American Revolution, which he saw as being corrupted in his own time. Second, it analyses Lincoln's supposed 'passivity' as more aptly defined as wise caution. Lincoln learned as a legislator, first in Illinois and later in the United States Congress, that bold initiatives often backfire and fail to fulfil original intentions. In the state legislature, Lincoln supported a dramatic internal-improvements project that collapsed in the midst of a national depression. Lincoln also boldly opposed the Mexican War in Congress, only to see his cause evaporate as soon as a peace treaty was drafted with Mexico. In both instances, his timing was faulty. He had rushed into taking rigid policy positions when greater caution would have reaped better results. But in both instances, he learned lessons that would hold him in good stead later. Lincoln as president was wisely cautious, knowing that bold action could only disrupt the delicate coalition that kept the Union cause moving forward to victory. Harriet Beecher Stowe described Lincoln's unique strength as "swaying to every influence, yielding on this side and on that to popular needs, yet tenaciously and inflexibly bound to carry its great end". She wisely added that no other kind of strength could have seen the nation through the worst trial in its history. In filling this role, Abraham Lincoln fulfilled that which he had long regarded as his personal mission within the larger context of his nation's providential destiny.
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

Introductory Notes
1
Citizen Lincoln
3
Lincoln Reconsidered
4
The Mythological Lincoln
7
The Real versus the Ideal Lincoln
11
Hard and Humble Beginnings
13
The Household of Thomas Lincoln
14
The Influence of Henry Clay
19
Quincy
114
Alton
115
Illinois Reelects Douglas
118
Campaign and the Crisis
119
Waiting in the Wings
122
The Presidential Nomination
124
The Election
126
A Mandate for Limited Change
129

Lincoln the Navigator
22
A Young Man in Illinois
24
Elected by the People
29
New Challenges
33
Young Lincoln on Slavery and Race
37
Lincoln and Women
39
Lawyer Lincolns Congressional Ambitions
45
Frustrated Ambitions
53
The Presidential Campaign of 1848
57
Lincoln Takes an Antislavery Stand
65
California Gold Radicalizes American Politics
67
Out of Office
68
Slavery and Union
70
Deep Cogitation
73
The KansasNebraska Act
81
Lincoln Opposes Calhoun
84
Lincoln Challenges Douglas
88
A Whig in Search of a New Party
90
Somebody Named Lincoln
95
The Dred Scott Decision
96
The Lecompton Constitution
99
Challenging Douglass Reelection
100
Ottawa
104
Freeport
105
Jonesboro
106
Charleston
109
Galesburg
111
Abstractions to Die For
132
Lincoln Goes to Washington
135
Waiting for War
139
Responsibility for the Apocalypse
143
Herding Cats
147
Preserver Protector and Defender
149
The Politics of Union
152
Lincolns Gift of Detachment
155
Lincoln and McClellan
157
The Great Emancipator?
162
The Cautious Emancipator
166
Waiting and Preparing for the Backlash
170
Antietams Aftermath
172
A Union Worth Saving
177
From Vallandigham to Gettysburg
178
Turning Grant Loose
182
Lincolns PreElection Political Arena
185
Mr Lincolns Treachery
187
A Momentum Toward Victory
192
End Game
196
Celebration and Tragedy
200
Now He Belongs to the Ages
205
A Man of Destiny
209
Bibliography
213
Index
221
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página xix - I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me. Now, at the end of three years' struggle, the nation's condition is not what either party or any man devised, or expected. God alone can claim it. Whither it is tending seems plain. If God now wills the removal of a great wrong, and wills also that we of the North as well as you of the South, shall pay fairly for our complicity in that wrong, impartial history will find therein new cause to attest and revere...
Página xi - Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into actual Service of the United States...

Información bibliográfica