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THE WORKS

OF

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HENRY G. BOHN, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

MDCCCLII.

- B В

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FRO"A THE LIBRARY OF
NORWOOD PENROSE HALLOWELL

SEPTEMBER 28, 1934

PRINTED BY cox (BROTHERS) AND WYMAN, GREAT QUEEN STREET,

LINCOLN'S-INN FIELDS.

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The Fifth Book ; the particular part continued. Of many things questionable as

they are commonly described in pictures. Of many popular customs, &c.

Chap. 1. Of the picture of the pelican..

Page

Chap. 2. Of the picture of dolphins

4

Chap. 3. Of the picture of a grasshopper

6

Chap. 4. Of the picture of the serpent tempting Eve

9

Chap. 5. Of the picture of Adam and Eve with navels

Chap. 6. Of the pictures of the Jews and Eastern nations, at their feasts,

especially our Saviour at the Passover

17

Chap. 7. Of the picture of our Saviour with long hair

26

Coap. 8. Of the picture of Abraham sacrificing Isaac

28

Chap. 9. Of the picture of Moses with horns

29

Chap. 10. Of the scutcheons of the twelve tribes of Israel

32

Chap. 11. Of the pictures of the sibyls

38

Chap. 12. Of the picture describing the death of Cleopatra

39

Chap. 13. Of the pictures of the nine worthies

42

Chap. 14. Of the picture of Jephthah sacrificing his daughter

47

Chap. 15. Of the picture of John the Baptist in a camel's skin

50

Chap. 16. Of the picture of St. Christopher

52

Chap. 17. Of the picture of St. George

54

Chap. 18. Of the picture of St. Jerome

56

Chap. 19. Of the pictures of mermaids, unicorns, and some others

59

Chap. 20. Of the hieroglyphical pictures of the Egyptians

65

Chap. 21. Of the picture of Haman hanged

69

Chap. 22. Of the picture of God the Father; of the sun, moon, and winds,

with others

72

Chap. 23. Compendiously of many popular customs, opinions, &c. : viz. of an

hare crossing the high-way; of the ominous appearing of owls and

ravens ; of the falling of salt; of breaking the egg-shell ; of the

true lovers' knot; of the cheek burning or ear tingling; of speaking

under the rose; of smoke following the fair; of sitting cross-

legged; of hair upon moles; of the set time of paring of nails; of

lions' heads upon spouts and cisterns; of the saying, ungirt,

unblest; of the sun dancing on Easter-day; of the silly-how; of

being drunk once a month; of the appearing of the devil with a

cloven hoof.

79

Chap. 24. Of popular customs, opinions, &c.; of the prediction of the year en-

suing from the insects in oak apples; that children would naturally

speak Hebrew; of refraining to kill swallows ; of lights burning dim

at the apparition of spirits ; of the wearing of coral ; of Moses' rod

in the discovery of mines ; of discovering doubtful matters by book

or staff ..

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THE SEVENTH Book ; the particular part concluded. Of popular and received

tenets, chiefly historical and some deduced from the Holy Scriptures.

Chap. 1. That the forbidden fruit was an apple

210

Chap. 2. That a man hath one rib less than a woman

214

Chap. 3. Of Methuselah ..

216

Chap. 4. That there was no rainbow before the flood

219

Chap. 5. Of Shem, Ham, and Japheth

Chap. 6. That the tower of Babel was erected against a second deluge

Chap. 7. Of the mandrakes of Leah

Chap. 8. Of the three kings of Collein

232

Chap. 9. Of the food of John Baptist, locusts and wild honey

Chap. 10. That John the Evangelist should not die

Chap. 11. Of some others more briefly ..

Chap. 12. Of the cessation of oracles

Chap. 13. Of the death of Aristotle

Chap. 14. Of the wish of Philoxenus to have the neck of a crane

Chap. 15. Of the lake Asphaltites

255

Chap. 16. Of divers other relations: viz. of the woman that conceived in a

bath; of Crassus that never laughed but once; that our Saviour

never laughed; of Sergius the Second, or Bocca di Porco; that

Tamerlane was a Scythian shepherd

259

Chap. 17. Of some others : viz. of the poverty of Belisarius; of Auctus decü-

manus, or the tenth wave; of Parisatis that poisoned Statira by

one side of a knife; of the woman fed with poison, that should

have poisoned Alexander ; of the wandering Jew; of pope Joan ;

of friar Bacon's brazen head that spoke; of Epicurus

267

Chap. 18. More briefly of some others : viz. that the army of Xerxes drank

whole rivers dry; that Hannibal eat through the Alps with vinegar ;

of Archimedes his burning the ships of Marcellus ; of the Fabii

that were all slain; of the death of Æschylus; of the cities of

Tarsus and Anchiale built in one day; of the great ship Syracusia

or Alexandria ; of the Spartan boys

276

Chap. 19. Of some relations whose truth we fear :: :: :: ::

293

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PSEUDODOXIA EPIDEMICA.

THE FIFTH BOOK:

THE PARTICULAR PART CONTINUED.

OF MANY THINGS QUESTIONABLE AS THEY ARE COMMONLY

DESCRIBED IN PICTURES; OF MANY POPULAR CUSTOMS, ETC.

CHAPTER I.

Of the Picture of the Pelican.

AND first, in every place we meet with the picture of the pelican, opening her breast with her bill, and feeding her young ones with the blood distilled from her. Thus is it set forth not only in common signs, but in the crest and scutcheon of many noble families; hath been asserted by many holy writers, and was an hieroglyphick of piety and pity among the Egyptians; on which consideration they spared them at their tables.

1 And first, &c.] These singular birds are said to fish in companies ; they form a circle on the water, and having by the flapping of their huge wings, driven the terrified fish towards the centre, they suddenly dive all at once as by consent, and soon fill their immense pouches with their prey. In order subsequently to disgorge the contents, in feeding their young, they have only to press the pouch on their breast. This operation may very probably have given rise to the fable, that the pelican opens her breast to nourish her

young As to its hieroglyphical import, Horapollo says that it was used among the Egyptians as an emblem of folly; on account of the little care it takes to deposit its eggs in a safe place. He relates that it buries them in a hole ; that the natives, observing the place, cover it with dry cow's dung, to which they set fire. The old birds immediately endeavouring to extinguish the fire with their wings, get them burnt, and so are easily caught.- Horap. Hierogl. cura Pauw, 4to. Traj. ad Rh. 1727, Pp. 67, 68.

VOL. II.

B

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