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CONTINGENT EXPENSES, UNITED STATES SENATE

COMMUNICATION

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

A SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE OF APPROPRIATION FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES, UNITED STATES SENATE, AMOUNTING TO $40,000

JANUARY 5 (calendar day, JANUARY 12), 1931.-Read, referred to the Committe on Appropriations, and ordered to be printed

The President of the Senate.

THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, January 10, 1931.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Congress, and without revision, a supplemental estimate of appropriation pertaining to the Legislative Establishment, United States Senate, for the fiscal year 1931, in the sum of $40,000.

Respectfully,

The PRESIDENT.

HERBERT HOOVER.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,
Washington, January 10, 1931.

SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith for your consideration a supplemental estimate of appropriation pertaining to the Legislative Establishment, United States Senate, as follows:

Contingent expenses, Senate: For expenses of inquiries and investigations ordered by the Senate, including compensation to stenographers of committees at such rate as may be fixed by the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, but not exceeding 25 cents per hundred words, fiscal year 1931... The letter of the financial clerk of the United States Senate submitting this estimate is transmitted herewith.

Very respectfully,

J. CLAWSON ROOP,

$40,000

Director of the Bureau of the Budget.

UNITED STATES SENATE,

January 9, 1931.

Col. J. CLAWSON ROOP,

Director of the Bureau of the Budget.

DEAR SIR: I submit herewith an estimate, in addition to the one for $60,000 sent you on December 2, 1930, to be included for the Senate in the next deficiency appropriation bill, as follows:

SENATE

For expenses of inquiries and investigations ordered by the Senate, including compensation to stenographers of committees at such rate as may be fixed by the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, but not exceeding 25 cents per hundred words, $40,000, fiscal year 1931.

And respectfully ask consideration of the same by your office with a view of approval by the President and transmission to Congress. Very respectfully,

CHAS. F. PACE,
Financial Clerk.

Supplemental estimate of appropriation required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1981, by the Legislative Establishment

Contingent expenses, Senate:

UNITED STATES SENATE

For expenses of inquiries and investigations ordered by the Senate, including compensation to stenographers of committees at such rate as may be fixed by the committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, but not exceeding 25 cents per hundred words, fiscal year 1931 (act June 6, 1930, vol. 46, p. 507)

$40,000

Amount appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1931----- 250, 000

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CLAIMS AND EXPENSES UNDER THE STATE DEPARTMENT

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

REPORT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE RECOMMENDING THE ENACTMENT OF LEGISLATION FOR: RELIEF OF RAIMUNDA VALLADARES DE CALDERON; REIMBURSEMENT OF DEMETRIO VALLE; REIMBURSEMENT OF SALVADOR BUITRAGO DIAZ; REIMBURSEMENT OF DR. ENRIQUE KLINGHOFFER AND DR. BR. RAPPOCCIOLI; CLAIM OF LING MAU MAU, CLAIM OF JANET HARDCASTLE ROSS; PROPOSED DEPORTATION OF ENEMY ALIENS FROM CHINA TO AUSTRALIA; FOURTH PAN AMERICAN COMMERCIAL CONGRESS; REIMBURSEMENT OF N. J. MOOSA, EXPENSES OF PARTICIPATION BY THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD'S GRAIN EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE

JANUARY 5 (calendar day, JANUARY 12), 1931.-Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report by the Secretary of State recommending the enactment of legislation for the following purposes:

I. For the relief of the widow, Raimunda Valladares de Calderon, and children of Justo Calderon, a native Nicaraguan, who was shot to death on January 30, 1930, by Chief Pharmacist's Mate Willie H. Williamson, United States Navy, who was serving as a second lieutenant in the Nicaraguan National Guard.

II. For reimbursement of Demetrio Valle, a Nicaraguan citizen, which arose from bombing operations of a United States Marine Corps airplane near Palsagua, Nicaragua, on or about April 11, 1929. III. For reimbursement of Salvador Buitrago Diaz, owner of the newspaper La Tribuna, of Managua, Nicaragua, for damage done to his property by United States Marines on February 6, 1921.

IV. For reimbursement of Dr Enrique Klinghoffer and Dr. Br. Rappoccioli, for payment for professional services rendered and medical supplies furnished to Charles Stevens McReynolds, deceased, former major, United States Marine Corps.

V. For payment of a claim against the Navy Department in the sum of $1,500 United States currency transmitted to that department by the commander in chief, United States Asiatic Fleet, after a consultation with the American consul general at Shanghai, regarding proper compensation in the circumstances, in behalf of Ling Mau Mau, a citizen of China for personal injuries received by him as a result of a collision between a Chinese junk on which he was aboard and the United States naval vessel Whipple, which occurred in the Whangpoo River on May 20, 1930.

VI. For payment of a claim of Miss Janet Hardcastle Ross, a Canadian citizen, for compensation for personal injuries resulting from the dropping of a dummy bomb by a United States Navy airplane near Coronado, Calif., on March 27, 1929.

VII. For payment of claims presented by the Governments of Great Britain and Japan for reimbursement by the Government of the United States of its share in the expenses incurred by the Governments of Great Britain and Japan in connection with the proposed deportation of enemy aliens from China to Australia during the World War.

VIII. To provide $15,000 for the expenses of the Fourth Pan American Commercial Conference, to be held in Washington in 1931.

IX. Report and recommendation concerning a claim against the Navy Department in the sum of $15.59, United States currency, in behalf of N. J. Moosa, a citizen of Great Britain, for reimbursement of expenses of medical services and hospital treatment incurred by him as the result of a collision at Shanghai, China, on September 13, 1928, between a United States Marine Corps truck and a broker's trap in which he was riding.

X. To provide $50,000 for the expenses of participation by the United States in the World's Grain Exhibition and Conference to be held in Canada in 1932.

The recommendations of the Secretary of State have my approval and I request the enactment of legislation for the purposes stated in order that this Government may carry out the projects and meet the obligations outlined in the report.

THE WHITE HOUSE, January 12, 1931.

HERBERT HOOVER.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 9, 1931.

The PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to submit, with a view to their transmission to Congress in case you approve, the following reports and recommendations for the enactment of legislation:

I. Report and recommendation for the relief of the widow, Raimunda Valladares de Calderon, and children of Justo Calderon, a native Nicaraguan, who was shot to death on January 30, 1930, by

Chief Pharmacist's Mate Willie H. Williamson, United States Navy, who was serving as a second lieutenant in the Nicaraguan National Guard.

In his letter of October 28, 1930, to the State Department, the Secretary of the Navy summarizes the facts concerning the killing of Justo Calderon and the situation of his widow and family as follows:

On January 30, 1930, a Guardia patrol of seven native Nicaraguan swere accompanying Chief Pharmacist's Mate Williamson from Pueblo Nueva, Nicaragua, to Somoto, Nicaragua. When in the neighborhood of La Cruz, the patrol met one Justo Calderon, who was mounted on horseback and accompanied by his son, a boy of 13 years, also mounted, and two other native Nicaraguans proceeding on foot. Williamson placed the group of Nicaraguans under arrest for alleged violations of customs regulations, to which the Nicaraguans peacefully submitted. The Guardia then proceeded toward Somoto with their prisoners. When about 30 yards from the place where the arrest occurred Williamson dismounted from the horse on which he was mounted and without cause or provocation fired one shot from his automatic pistol at Calderon, who fell to the ground. Williamson then fired several more shots into the prostrate body of Calderon as a result of which the latter died almost instantly.

Williamson was tried before a general court-martial, convened by the commanding general, Second Brigade, United States Marine Corps, at Ocotal, Nicaragua, for the offense of manslaughter and was convicted and sentenced to be confined for a period of two years in a naval prison and to be dishonorably discharged from the naval service. The evidence offered before the court-martial shows that the shooting of Calderon was deliberate and unprovoked and was entirely devoid of the slightest extenuating circumstances. It appears that Williamson was somewhat under the influence of intoxicating liquor at the time this occurrence took place. In acting on the record of proceedings of the general court-martial, the Navy Department expressed strong disapproval of the action of the court-martial in imposing a sentence in this case which was entirely inadequate for the offense committed.

The brigade commander Second Brigade, United States Marine Corps, Managua, Nicaragua, reports that the family of Calderon consists of his wife and 7 children ranging in ages from 7 months to 17 years. This officer recommends that provision be made for the payment to the widow of Calderon of $5 per month for herself for a period of 20 years and $3 per month for each child until reaching the age of 18 years. These figures were arrived at after an investigation of the standard of living of the poor-farmer class in the area where Calderon's family resides and are believed to be sufficient to care for the widow and children of Calderon as well as the average family of their class is now supported. The total sum that would be paid under this arrangement if made in monthly installments would be $3,396.

The Navy Department is of the opinion that the United States should take steps to provide reasonable compensation for the dependents of Justo Calderon. However, it is not believed to be practicable to arrange for the payment of compensation in monthly installments as recommended by the brigade commander, but in lieu thereof a lump-sum payment should be made.

The Secretary of the Navy, in computing the amount of reasonable compensation to be paid in a lump sum, has adopted the allowance of $5 per month for the widow for a period of 20 years and of $3 per month for each child until reaching the age of 18 years, the total amount thus figured to be discounted at the rate of 4 per cent, true discount, compounded annually. (It is pointed out that this is the method provided by the Congress in connection with the payment of lump sums to beneficiaries under the United States employees' compensation act. U. S. C., title 5, sec. 764.) The sum arrived at by this method amounts to $2,524.61. The Secretary of the Navy therefore recommends that legislation be enacted to provide an indemnity in the amount of $2,500 for the relief of Raimunda Valladares de Calderon and her family on account of the death of Justo Calderon, in which recommendation I concur.

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