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the Mexicans, 187; nominated for President, and elec- , TYLER, JOHN, sketch of his political life. 154. to
ted, 192; vote received, 193; inaugurated, 195; 199; L 156: 169: 174: 185: Chairman of the Peace Confer
2:00; 21 ; Special Message, 202; Annual Message, 202;

ence,' 397; 402.
cornmunicates the California Constitution, 203; his
death, 2:13; proclamation against fillibustering, 269.

Twiggs, GEN., surrenders in Texas, 413; 442.
TAYLOR, JOHN W., of N. Y., 75; his speech on

the Missouri question, 77; 78.
TENNESSEE, slave population in 1790, 36; with-

draws froin the Charleston Convention, 318; refuses to
secede, 319; population in 1860, 351; her answer to the

UNION HUMANE SOCIETY, THE, 112.
President's call, 459; progress of Secession in, 481 to
451; vote on Secession; the conservative party, 481;

UNITARIANS, THE, and Slavery, 121.
makes a convention with the Contederacy, 452; Ordi United States Telegraph, The, 143.
nance of Secession, 492-3; vote on separation, 453; 496;

UNIVERSALISTS, THE, and Slavery, 121.
reign of terror in, 514. See EAST TENNESSEE.
TEXAS, reasons for its Annexation, 68; histori-

Upton, MR., of Va., in XXXVIIth Congress, 559.
cal sketch of, 147-3; early efforts to purchase it, 149;

UTICA, N, Y., Abolitionists dispersed at, 127.
revolutior, in, 150-1; Webster opposes the Annexation Utica Observer, The, on the President's call, 455–6.
of, 152-8; further efforts to acquire it, 151-8; Whigs in
Congress protest against Annexation, 159 ; Van Buren
and Clay oppose it, 161-4; Col. Bentonon, 165; in-
fluence of the question on the Presidential election,
160-3; Calhoun, favors Annexation, 169 to 171; Con-
gressional, 171 to 174; Annexation consummated,
175; admitted into the Union, 185–6; 209; withdraws VALLANDIGHAM, C. L., of Ohio, catechises old
froin the Dem. Convention, 315; Houston and Runnells, Brown, 293 ; his opinion of Brown, 294; his Peace
339; secession of, and vote thereon, 349; population in proposition, 384-5 ; remarks at the Extra Session, cen-
1560, 351; 373; Twiggs's treason, etc., 413; 514-15.

suring the Administration, 561; Inoves provisos to
THAYER, JAMES S., in Tweddle Hall, 392- 3 ; 396.

the Army Appropriation bill, etc., 561 ; 562; 615; 629.
THEODORA, THE, conveys Mason and Slidell, 606.

VAN BUREN, John, on Fugitive Slave Act, 213.
THOMAS, ADJ'T GEN., accompanies Gen, Cameron

VAN BUREN, MARTIN, influences causing his de-

feat in the Baltimore Convention of 1814, 69, supports
on his Western tour, 590; 615.

the Tariff of 1828, 91; supplants Calhoun as Vice-Presi.
THOMAS, COL., (Rebel,) killed at Bull Run, 543.

dent in 1832, 93; allusion t), 130; makes an offer to Mex-
THOMAS, FRANCIS, replies to Mr. May, 564.

ico for Texas, 149; his reply to Gen. Huni, 151; is beat-
THOMAS, GEN., crosses the Potomac, 235.

en by Gen, Harrison, 154; 156 ; 159 ; his reply to Wm.

H. Hammet, 161; 162, 163; 165 ; letter to Waterbury
THOMAS, JESSE B., of Ill., on Missouri, 79.

and others, 190; nominated for President by the Free-
THOMAS, PHILIP FRANCIS, appointed Secretary of Soilers, 191; tó Minister Van Ness, 269; 426.
the Treasury, 411; resigns, 412.

VANDEVER, MR., of Iowa, offers a resolution, 568.
THOMPSON, JEFF., 574; is defeated at Frederick VERMONT, slave population of, in 1790, 36; 326.
town, Mo., 591.

VERPLANCK, GULIAN C., his Tariff b:ll, 101. .
THOMPSON, JACOB, fraud discovered in his De-

VICTOR, 0. J., reference to his “ History of the
partment, 410; advises the traitors of the Star of the
West's departure; his resignation, 412; 435.

Southern Rebellion," 350.
THOMPSON, JUDGE JAMES, of Pa., speaks in favor

VIENNA, Va., the affair at, 533-4; reöccupied by

our forces, 620.
of the Fugitive Slave Law, 212.

VINCENNES, U. S. SHIP, runs aground, 603.
THOMPSON, GEORGE, 127.

VIRGINIA, 17; feeble colonial growth, natural
Tipton, Mo., Gen. Fremont is visited by. Gen.

advantages of, etc., 23; negroes first introduced, 29;
Cameron and suite at, 590.

slave population of, in 1790; troops furnished during
TITUS, COL., of Fla., a Border Ruffian, 243.

the Revolution, 36; her territorial clains, 37: her deed
TOD, Gov. DAVID, of Ohio, chosen President of of cession to the Confederation, 33; legislative resolves
the Donglas Convention, 318.

of 1789, St; sympathizes with South Carolina in her

Nullification wefeat, 100; first Abolition Society in, 107;
TOMPKINS, LIEUT. C. H., dashes into Fairfax, 533.

Convention of 1829, 109 to 111; resolution of the Legis-
TOOBS, ROBERT, of Ga., 382; his dispatch to lature on the suppression of Abolition, 123; relations

Georgia, 334; 353; a member of Davis's Cabinet, 429. with the District of Columbia, 142; Resolutions of '98
TOPEKA, Kansas, Free-State Convention at, 240; and '99 indorsed by the Democratic Convention of 1952,
the Legislature at, dispersed, 244.

222; withdrawal of delegates from the Charleston Con-
TOUCEY, ISAAC, in the Dem. Convention, 317.

vention, 319; the position of Letcher as Governor, 340;

State unable to secede, 315-3; population in 1960, 351;
TOWNSEND, COL. F., at Little Bethel, 529–30.

Convention of to ratify the Federal Constitution, 357;
TRAVIS, COL., put to death in Texas, 150.

calls the • Peace Conference, 396–7; sends new Cominis-
TRENHOLM, MR., of S. C., offers resolves favoring

sioners to President Lincoln, 452; the President's reply
coöperation,' 333-4.

to the Cominissioners, 45%; Secession of the State, and

the Convention's vote thereon, 452; her answer to the
TRENT, THE, Mason and Slidell abstracted from,

President's call for troops, 439; einissaries of, sent to
606; Secretary Welles on the seizure, 606; Great Brit. Baltimore, 462 ; State troops seize Ilarper's Ferry, 462;
ain's course, 607-S.

she threatens Western Maryland, 409; commences
TRESCOTT, Wu. H., Garnett's letter to, 479–80. hostilities before she is fairly out of the Union, 473;
TROUP, Gov., of Ga., sympathizes with the Nul-

allusion to the Convention of, 430; enters i!to a Con-

vention with the Southern Con oleracy, 477; reign of
lifiers, 100, his treatment of the Indians, 103.

terror in; the situation considered by Messrs. Stuart
True American, The, on the President's call, 457.

and Mason, 475-9; popular vote on the Orlinance of
TRUMBULL, LYJAN, of Ill., 307; 563; offers an Secession, 47); M. R. II. Garnett oil Virginii and
amnendment to the Confiscation bill, 563.

West Virginia, 479-S0; sends no delegates to the Ken-
TRUXILLO, landing and death of Walker at, 277. tucky Peace Convention, 495; allusio'n to her Dis-

union, 510; Convention between the State and the
Tuck, Avos. of N. II., a member of the Peace

Confederacy, 510; Letcher calls out the militia to repel
Conference,' 393; resolutions of, 393; 404,

Federal invasion, 516-17; admitted into the Conted-
TURRILL, JOEL, of N. Y., 115.

eracy, and Gen. Lee placed in command of the Confed-
TUSCARORA, Ú. S. GUXBOAT, blockades the erate forces, 518; boundary between West and Old
Sumter, 602; blockades the Nashville, 603.

Virginia, 527; the President's Message with regard to,

557. See WEST VIRGINIA, NORFOLK, BETHEL, BULL
TYLER, COL., routeil in West Virginia, 525.

Run, etc.
TYLER, GEN., at Bull Run, 5:39; 511-2.

| VOYAGES, OCEAN, by sth Cerrsus, 23

W.

WIGFALL, LEWIS T., of Texas, 373; 448. WADE, B. F., of Ohio, 231; 232; speech, 375–6. WILCOX, COL., wounded at Bull Run, 545. WALKER, MR., of Wisc., 172; 195.

WILD CAT, Ky., Rebels defeated at, 615–16. WALKER, ROBERT J., Governor of Kansas, 249. WILKES, CAPT., seizes Mason and Slidell, 606-7. WALKER, L. P., of Ala., 312; 313; withdraws at WILKESCARRE, Pa., fugitive-slave case at, 216.

Charleston, 314; speech after fåll of Sumter, 458; 632. WILLIAMS, EUPHEMIA, the case of, 216. TVALKER, WILLIAM, his invasion of Nicaragua, WILLIAMS, COL. JOHN S., at Piketon, Kv., 616. and his death, 276-7.

WILMOT, DAVID, of Pa., 189; 319. WALLACE, COL. LEWIS, 535.

WILSON, SENATOR, of Mass., 309; 571–2. WALWORTH, R. H., at Tweddle Hall, 393-4.

WILSON'S ZOUAVES, at Santa Rosa Island, 602. WASHBURNE, MR., of Ill., 305; 560.

WILSON'S CREEK, battle of, 578 to 582. WASHINGTON, GEORGE, letter to Laurens, 19; 42;

WINTHROP, MAJOR THEO., killed at Bethel, 531. 43; letters to Lafayette, 51; 81; 82; 83; his fair dealing with the Indians, 102; 254; his Foreign Policy, 264;

Winchester Virginian, The, J. M. Mason to, 478-9. citation from his Farewell Address, 266; allusion to, 515. WISE, HENRY A., his prescription for AbolitionWASHINGTON, COL. JOIN A., captured by Brown's ists, 128; 144; 146; his speech in the House, 1842, men, 290; 293; killed at Cheat Mountain, 526.

158; opinion of John Brown, 293, 294; 329; como WASHINGTON CITY, 407; frauds of Floyd and Baily

mands the Rebels in West Virginia, 522; 524; outat, 410-11; arrival of Col. Hayne at, 412, inauguration

rankerl by Floyd, etc., 525. of President Lincoln at, 421-2; the dark days at, 470.

\'ISCONSIN, 215; 300; 301.. Wushington Star, The, citation from, 329.

WISTAR, LIEUT.-COL., at Ball's Bluff, 623. WAUL, T. N., beaten for Congress, 339.

WITHERSPOON, REV. T. S., 128. WAYNE, JUDGE, of Ga., on Dred Scott, 259. WooL, GEN., succeeds Gen. Butler, 531. WEBSTER, DANIEL, 78; his reply to Hayne, 86 WOOD, COL. A. M., wounded at Bull Run, 545.

7; 101; speech at Niblo's Garden, 152 to 154, 155; WOODWARD, JUDGE GEO. W., speech at the Phil192; 202; speech at Abington, 193; 205-6; 207; on the adelphia “Peace' meeting, 363 to 365; 406; 438. Fugitive Slave Law, 220-21; 223; 260 ; 271 ; letter from

WORCESTER, Mass., mob violence at, 126.
Channing to, 353; 370; speech at Buffalo, 404; 511.
WEED, THURLOW, editorial by, 360-61.

WRENTHAM, Mass., Abolition petition from, 144. WEIGHTMAN, COL., killed at Wilson's Creek, 582.

WRIGHT, COL. J. V., killed at Belmont, 597-8. WESTON, Mo., a man tarred and feathered at, 239.

WRIGHT, SILAS, 91; nominated for Vice-Presi.

dent, 164; nominated for Governor of New York, 166. Weston Reporter, The, (Mo.,) citation from, 238.

WYANDOT. Kansas, Convention at, 250.
WESTPORT, Mo., Border Ruffian resolvez at, 239.
WENTZ, LIEUT.-COL, killed at Belmont, 597.
WESLEY, JOHN, 32; 70; 255, 501.
WEST VIRGINIA, 479; 480 ; population in 1860,

YANCEY, WM. L., his non-interference resolve 430; refuses to secede, etc., 518; Pierpont chosen Governor of, 519; Letcher's Message, 519; Federal troops

in the Convention of 1848, 192; allusion to, 259; with. enter the State; Porterfield's Address, 521; battle of draws froin the Charleston Convention, 314. Philippi, 321-2 ; of Rich Mountain, 522–3; Cheat Moun YATES, EDWARD, on Slavery, 70. tain, 523 ; Carnifex Ferry, 525; Guyandotte destroyed, | YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, their in. 526; boundary between West and Old Virginia, 521.

terview with the President, 466-7; allusion, 472. WHEELING, Va, meeting and Convention at, 518. Whecling Intelligencer, The, citation from, 522. WHITNEY, ELI, 53; early life, etc., 58-9; goes to

Georgia, 60; invents the Cotton-Gin, 61; letter to Fulton, 0); his death, 66.

ZAGONYI, MAJOR, his speech to his soldiers, WHITE, J. W., letter from T. A. Andrews to, 367.

591-2; his gallant charge into Springfield, 592. WHITE, LIEUT.-COL., at Carnifex Ferry, 525.

ZEIGLER, COL., orders the houses of Secessionists WHITE, MAJOR FRANK J., 591-2.

at Guyandotte to be burnt, 526. WHİTFIELD, JOHN W., 237; 240; 241; sacks

ZOLLICOFFER, GEN., occupies Cumberland Gap;

his dispatch to Magoffin, 613; captures Barboursville, and burns Osawatomie, 245.

Ky.; his depredations on the Kentuckians, 614; atWHITTIER, JOHN G., poem by, 630.

tacks, and is driven from, Wild-Cat, 615.

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END OF VOL. I.

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