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I loved thee passing well;—thou wert a beam
Of pleasant beauty on this stormy sea,
With just so much of mirth as miglit redeem
Man from the musings of his misery;
Yet ever pensive, like a thing from home!
Lovely and lonely as a single star!
But kind and true to me, as thou hadst come
From thine own element—so very far,
Only to be a cynosure to eyes
Now sickening at the sunshine of the skies!
It were a crime to weep !—'tis none to kneel,
As now I kneel, before this type of thee,
And worship her, who taught my soul to feel
Such worship is no vain idolatry :-
Thou wert my spirit's spirit-and thou art,
Though this be all of thee time hath not reft,
Save the old thoughts that hang about the heart,
Like withered leaves that many storms have left ;
I turn from living looks—the cold, the dull,
To any trace of thee-the lost, the beautiful !
Broken, and bow'd, and wasted with regret,
I gaze, and weep-why do I weep alone!
I would not-would not, if I could forget,
But I am all remembrancemit hath grown
My very being !---Will she never speak?
The lips are parted, and the braided hair
Seems as it waved upon her brightening cheek,
And smile, and everything—but breath-are there !
Oh, for the voice that I have staid to hear,
-Only in dreams, so many a lonely year!
It will not be ;-away, bright cheat, away!
Cold, far too cold to love !—thy look grows strange ;
I want the thousand thoughts that used to play,
Like lights and shadowings, in chequer'd change ;
That smile!-I know thou art not like her, now,-
Within her land-where'er it be—of light,
She smiles not while a cloud is on my brow :-
When will it pass away—this heavy night!
Oh! will the cool clear morning never come,

And light me to her, in her spirit's home! Mr Montgomery cannot write anything, however slight, that is not pregnant with piety. Common-place truths are so presented in the following singular little poem, as to strike the heart like a knell. This is the triumph of genius.

Q. Nature, whence sprang thy glorious QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

frame?

A. My Maker called me and I came. Q. Flowers, wherefore do ye

bloom? A. We strew thy pathway to the tomb.

Q Winds, whence and whither do ye

blow? Q. Stars, wherefore do ye rise ?

A. Thou must be “born again,” to know. A. To light thy spirit to the skies.

Q. Ocean, what rules thy swell and fall? Q. Fair moon, why dost thou wane? A. The might of Him that ruleth all. A. That I may wax again.

Q. Planets, what guides you in your Q. O sun, what makes thy beams so

course ? bright?

A. Unseen, unfelt, unfailing force. A. The Word that said " Let there be light."

Q. O life, what is thy breath ?

A. A vapour, vanishing in death.
Q. Time, whither dost thou flee?
A. I travel to eternity.

Q. O grave, where is thy victory?
R. Eternity, what art thou, say?

A. Ask Him who rose again from me. A. I was, am, will be ever more, to-day, Q. O death, where ends thy strife ?

A. In everlasting life. VoL, XIX.

M

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Where art thou, proud ATLANTIS, now? next year, for giving interest to its pages.

Where are thy bright and brave ? The difficulties of his situation have, howPriest, people, warriors' living flow?

ever,

been greatly relieved, by the kind. Look on that wave!

ness and promptitude with which assist

ance has been given to him, in almost Crime deepen’d on the recreant land, every quarter in which the limited time Long guilty, long forgiven;

permitted an application :--and, whilst There power uprear'd the bloody hand, he has thus been enabled to present to There scoff'd at Heaven,

the public, on the present occasion, a very

splendid assemblage of names and talent, The word went forth the word of woe -the promises which he has received of

The judgment-thunders pealed ; continued and additional assistance, next The fiery earthquake blazed below; year, afford reason to hope that it will Its doom was seal’d.

have still increased claims to popularity.

“ The readers of the “ FRIENDSHIP'S Now on its halls of ivory

OFFERING,' will perceive that the alterLie giant weed and ocean slime, ations in its plan consist in the removal Burying from man's and angel's eye of all those features which marked it as The land of crime.

more peculiarly adapted for one season of

the year than another; and in the disMr Ackermann was, we believe, missal of its more toy-like attributes, for among the first of the booksellers who

the purpose of combining, with the in. published volumes of this kind in creased beauty of its embellishments, a England, and we strongly recommend high literary character.

Forget me Not," both on that “Whilst acknowledging his obligations account and its own intrinsic merits, to the many friends who have given him which are great and manifold.

the use of their names and talents, the We come now to speak of “Friend- Editor may escape the imputation of pership's Offering,” and its new editor, sonal vanity, in expressing his confidence Mr Hervey. But first let Mr Her

that the Work has attained the character vey speak for himself:

at which it aimed ; because little merit “ The present Volume of the 'FRIEND

can be due to him, for the moral or liteship's OFFERING' is presented to the

rary excellence of a miscellany, which public, under circumstances which render

has been fortunate enough to obtain such a few observations necessary. It has,

contributions as those which fill the pages very recently, come into its present Edi- of this volume.” tor's hands, with a view to an entire Mr Hervey has acquitted himself change in its character and plan; and, admirably in his editorial capacity; under the disadvantage of that fact, he and, like Mr Watts, is himself one of has, of course, found it impossible to his own very best contributors. There avail himself of all those sources which is much passion-much poetry in the he has reason to believe are open to him, following fine stanzas :

his «

1

TO THE PICTURE OF A DEAD GIRL, ON FIRST SEEING IT.
The same-and oh, how beautiful !-the same
As memory meets thee through the mist of years !
Love's roses on thy cheek, and feeling's flame
Lighting an eye unchanged in all-but tears !
Upon thy severed lips the very smile
Remember'd well, the sunlight of my youth;
But gone the shadow that would steal, the while,
To mar its brightness, and to mock its truth! -
Once more I see thee, as I saw thee last,
The lost restored,--the vision of the past !

How like to what thou wert--and art not now!
Yet oh, how more resembling what thou art !
There dwells no cloud upon that pictured brow,
As sorrow sits no longer in thy heart;
Gone where its very wishes are at rest,
And all its throbbings hush’d, and achings healid ;-
I gaze, till half I deem thee to my breast,
In thine immortal loveliness, reveal'd,
And see thee, as in some permitted dream,
There where thou art what here thou dost but seem !

W

I loved thee passing well;-thou wert a beam
Of pleasant beauty on this stormy sea,
With just so much of mirth as miglit redeem
Man from the musings of his misery;
Yet ever pensive, like a thing from home!
Lovely and lonely as a single star!
But kind and true to me, as thou hadst come
From thine own element-so very far,
Only to be a cynosure to eyes
Now sickening at the sunshine of the skies!
It were a crime to weep —'tis none to kneel,
As now I kneel, before this type of thee,
And worship her, who taught my soul to feel
Such worship is no vain idolatry:-
Thou wert my spirit's spirit—and thou art,
Though this be all of thee time hath not reft,
Save the old thoughts that hang about the heart,
Like withered leaves that many storms have left ;
I turn from living looks—the cold, the dull,
To any trace of thee—the lost, the beautiful !
Broken, and bow'd, and wasted with regret,
I gaze, and weep-why do I weep alone !
I would not-would not, if I could-forget,
But I am all remembrancemit hath grown
My very being ! Will she never speak?
The lips are parted, and the braided hair
Seems as it waved upon her brightening cheek,
And smile, and everything—but breath-are there!
Oh, for the voice that I have staid to hear,
-Only in dreams,—so many a lonely year !
It will not be ;-away, bright cheat, away!
Cold, far too cold to love !-thy look grows strange ;
I want the thousand thoughts that used to play,
Like lights and shadowings, in chequer'd change ;
That smile!-I know thou art not like her, now,-
Within her land—where'er it be of light,
She smiles not while a cloud is on my brow :-
When will it pass away—this heavy night!
Oh! will the cool clear morning never come,

And light me to her, in her spirit's home! Mr Montgomery cannot write anything, however slight, that is not pregnant with piety.

Common-place truths are so presented in the following singular little poem, as to strike the heart like a knell. This is the triumph of genius.

Q. Nature, whence sprang thy glorious QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS,

frame ?

A. My Maker called me and I came. Q. Flowers, wherefore do ye bloom? A. We strew thy pathway to the tomb.

Q Winds, whence and whither do ye

blow? R. Stars, wherefore do ye rise ?

A. Thou must be “born again,” to know. A. To light thy spirit to the skies.

Q. Ocean, what rules thy swell and fall ? Q. Fair moon, why dost thou wane? A. The might of Him that ruleth all. A. That I may wax again.

Q. Planets, what guides you in your Q. O sun, what makes thy beams so

course? bright?

A. Unseen, unfelt, unfailing force. A. The Word that said" Let there be light.”

Q. O life, what is thy breath ?

A. A vapour, vanishing in death.
Q. Time, whither dost thou flee?
A. I travel to eternity.

Q. O grave, where is thy victory?

A. Ask Him who rose again from me. Q. Eternity, what art thou, say? A, I was, am, will be ever more, to-day. Q. O death, where ends thy strife ?

A. In everlasting life. VOL. XIX.

M

1

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STANZAS FOR MUSIC.

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We remember reading, some years

Thou need'st not helm nor cuirass now,
ago, a strange, wild, dreamy thing (we - Beyond the Grecian hero's boast,-
forget its name), by Cheviot Tichburn Thou wilt not quail thy naked brow,
-a fictitious name we presume. We Nor shrink before a myriad host,-
are glad to see him again in the fol- For head and heel alike are sound,
lowing elegant stanzas

A thousand arrows cannot wound !
Thy mother is not in thy dreams,
With that wild, widow'd look she wore

The day-how long to her it seems -
When the morning awakes in the valley,

She kiss'd thee, at the cottage door, And the dew in the sun-beam is bright,

And sicken'd at the sounds of joy Then forth, with light foot, let him sally

That bore away her only boy! Whose heart-like his footstep-is light!

Sleep, soldier !_let thy mother wait,

To hear thy bugle on the blast ; But he whose wan spirit is failing,

Thy dog, perhaps, may find the gate,
Whose heart but exists as a tomb,

And bid her home to thee at last;
Will roam when the mists are prevailing, He cannot tell a sadder tale
In the cloud-woven veil of the gloom !

Than did thy clarion, on the gale,

When last—and far away-she heard its For the gloom to his spirit is meeter,

lingering echoes fail! To the shade of his fortunes more true:

In conclusion we observe, that while And the scent of night's flowerets is

the embellishments of this volume are sweeter, -Like the last faded hopes that he scarcely, if at all, inferior to those of

the Literary Souvenir--the prose part knew!

is perhaps superior. But comparisons

are odious at all times, and more espeWe observe that Mr Hervey has advertised a new work, whether in cially between such rivals as Mr Watts prose or verse we know not; and as

and Mr Hervey. We have a sincere we look upon him as a young man of, regard for them both (though we nereal talent, and wish our readers to

ver saw either,) and a free literary

trade is best for all men of talents. have an opportunity of forming their own opinion, we extract another of

Why so laudatory this month, old his compositions

Christopher? methinks we hear mut-
tered by some pluckless Tory, or some
trimming Whig. Because we have

been dealing (as in this article) with WAKE, soldier !-wake !-thy war-horse gentlemen—both editors and publishwaits,

ers. But woe be unto some half score To bear thee to the battle back;

of scribes, in a month or two-yes, Thou slumberest at a foeman's gates ;

woe be unto them for the asses shall Thy dog would break thy bivouac; be flayed alive, ears and all, and sent Thy plume is trailing in the dust, scouring along Grub-street in raw maAnd thy red faulchion gathering rust!

terial. The world will acknowledge

that it never heard braying till that Sleep, soldier !-sleep!-thy warfare day-and ONE ANIMAL especially will o'er,

be seen and heard to open his jaws to Not thine own bugle's loudest strain such an apochryphal extent, that in Shall’ever break thy slumbers more, future ages the best authenticated acWith summons to the battle.plain; counts of his achievements will with A trumpet-note more loud and deep difficulty find admittance into systems Must rouse thee from that leaden sleep! of natural history.

THE DEAD TRUMPETER.

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WORKS PREPARING FOR PUBLICATION.

LONDON. Mr Alaric Watts has announced a vo- tural Antiquities of Normandy, by Mr lume of Poems, under the title of " Ly- Pagin, will soon be published. rics of the Heart.”

A History of the United States of Stories for the Christmas Week. In 2 America, from their first Settlement as vols.

Colonies, to the close of the War with A Translation of La Secchia Rapita, or Great Britain in 1815, will soon appear. the Rape of the Bucket; an Heroi-Co- The Fourth Part of Mr Bellamy's mical Poem, in Twelve Cantos. From Translation of the Bible. the Italian of Alessandro Tassoni. With A work, under the title of “ The Reign Notes, by James Atkinson, Esq. In 2 of Terror,” is announced ; consisting of a duodecimo volumes.

Collection of Authentic Narratives, by A Comparative View of the Different Eye-witnesses, of the Horrors committed Institutions for the Assurance of Lives, by the Revolutionary Government of in which every question that can interest France, under Marat and Robespierre. the Asssurer is discussed, is preparing for A new weekly publication, entitled, the press. By Charles Babbage, Esq. “ The Spirit and Manners of the Age," A.M. F.R.S. Lond. Edin. &c. It will will appear in January next. To be concontain extensive Tables of the Rates ducted by the author of “ The Evangeli. charged at all the Offices, as well as of cal Rainbler." the Profit made by each 'at various ages; A Memoir of the Court of Henry the together with some new Tables of the Eighth, including an Account of the MoRates of Mortality.

nastic Institutions in England at that Pe. The Divina Commedia of Dante Ali. riod, will soon appear. ghieri, with an Analytical Comment, by A Comparative View of Christianity, Gabriel Rossetti, is announced. In 6 and all other forms of Religion, is anvols.

nounced by Dr Brown. The Life of General Wolfe, from Ori. The Book of Churches and Sects, by ginal Documents, is about to appear in a Mr Boone, is on the eve of publication. form similar to Mr Southey's “ Life of Mr M. T. Sadler is preparing for pubNelson.”

lication, a Defence of the Principle of the Papers and Collections of Sir Robert Poor Laws, in answer to their impugners, Wilmot, Bart. some time Secretary to the Mr Malthus, Dr Chalmers, and others. Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, will soon ap- Together with suggestions for their impear.

provement, as well as for bettering the The Story of Isabel. By the author of character and condition of the labouring “ The Favourite of Nature.”

classes. To which will be added, an A Romance, to be entitled “The Last Essay on Population, in disproof of the Man," from the pen of Mrs Shelley, is in superfecundity of the human race, and a state of considerable forwardness. establishing, by induction, a contrary

The Prophets and Apostles Compared. theory. An Essay, proving the ulterior application A new edition of Moore's Irish Melo. of the Prophetic Writings ; with a Table dies, in separate Songs, with the Music, annexed, explaining the Two Thousand is announced for early publication. Three Hundred Days of Daniel, is in the Shortly will be published, The Domespress.

tic Preacher; or, Short Discourses from A Fourth Volume of Mr Stewart Rose's the MSS. of some Eminent Ministers. Orlando Furioso, will soon make its ap- The Second Volume of Mr Godwin's pearance.

History of the Commonwealth, is just The author of “ The Pilot" has an- ready for publication. nounced a new Novel, to be entitled Mrs Bray has nearly ready for the press, “ The Last of the Mohicans."

an Historical Romance, entitled De Foix, A Treatise on the Diseases of Children, or Sketches of the Manners and Customs by William P. Dewees, M.D. is announ- of the Fourteenth Century. ced for early publication.

Mr Garrow, of St John's College, A work is announced, under the title Cambridge, has announced a History of of “ The History of the Assassins," from Lymington and its immediate Vicinity, Oriental Authorities. Translated from with a Brief Account of its Vegetable and the German of Jos. Von Hanmer. With Mineral Productions. Notes and Illustrations.

The author of “ Solace of an Invalid," The Second Number of the Architeca is preparing a work, to be entitled,

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