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p. 199.

Similar provisions: Georgia, 6 Park's Ann. Code 1914, secs. 351-53; Illinois, 6 Ann. Stat. 1913, par. 11025; Louisiana, 2 Marr's Ann. Stat. 1915, sec. 4575; Maine, Rev. Stat. 1916, ch. 15, sec. 18; Massachusetts, Rev. Laws 1902, p. 309; Mississippi. 2 Hem. Ann. Code 1917, sec. 5650; Montana, 2 Rev. Codes 1907, sec. 1074; 3 Rev. Code 1915 Supp., secs. 1109m, 11090; Nevada, 1 Rev. Laws 1912, sec. 4083; Oklahoma, 1 Rev. Laws 1910, sec. 3930; Oregon, 2 Lord's Laws 1910, sec. 3839; Tennessee, Code 1918, sec. 643a-88; Texas, 2 Vernon's Crim. Stat. 1916, p. 135, art. 264a; 4 Vernon's S. Civil Stat. 1914, art. 5891; Utah, Comp. Laws 1907, secs. 1463–64; Virginia, 1 Ann. Code 1904, sec. 363; Wisconsin, Stat. 1917, sec. 21.17,

281. Colored troops to be kept separate from white.—When called into active service, the colored organizations shall as far as practicable be kept separate from white troops; but in cases where it becomes necessary for the colored and white troops to serve together, the command shall devolve upon the senior officer of the white troops present, regardless of rank.

South Carolina, Acts 1916, No. 364, p. 657. 282. Credit for war service.—Officers and enlisted men of the National Guard or Naval Militia who enter the active service of the United States shall, upon termination of such service, be entitled to time so served as if such service had been rendered in the State.

Arizona, Laws 1918, ch. 3, p. 6. Similar provisions, including service in the Spanish-American War: California, Stat. 1899, p. 158; Gen. Laws 1915, Act 2429; New Mexico, Stat. 1915, sec. 3863; New York, Laws 1917, ch. 644, sec. 102; North Dakota, 1 Comp. Laws 1913, sec. 2392; Oregon, 2 Lord's Laws 1910, sec. 3825; South Dakota, Laws 1913, ch. 267, sec. 34, 1 Comp. Laws 1913, p. 631.

283. Disqualified for holding office.-AU persons convicted of bribery, larceny, perjury, or any other infamous crime, or who shall make or become directly or indirectly interested in any bet or wager, the result of which shall depend upon any election, or who shall hereafter fight a duel, or send or accept a challenge to fight, or who shall be second to any party, or bearer of such challenge or acceptance, shall be excluded from every office of honor, power, trust, or profit, civil or military, within this State, and from the right of suffrage; but the legal disability shall not accrue until after trial and conviction by due form of law. Nothing in this article shall be so construed as to remove or effect any punishment or legal disability resulting from convictions heretofore.

Florida, 1 Comp. Laws 1914, sec. 295; Const. art. 6, sec. 5. 284. Eligibility for appointment as officers.Officers, active and retired, and former officers of the United States Army, Navy, and Marine Corps and graduates of the United States Military and Naval Academies and of schools, colleges, and universities where military science is taught under the supervision of an officer of the Regular Army are eligible for appointment as officers in the militia.

Hawail, Laws 1917, act 209, sec. 193.

285. Governor can not hold military office.-No person shall at the same time hold the office of governor and any other office, civil or military, under this State or the United States.

Alabama, Const. art. 5, sec. 130 286. Appointee to any military office must be a qualified elector.-No person, except a qualified elector, shall be elected or appointed to any civil or military office in the State.

Colorado, Const. art. 7, sec. 6. Similar provision: Illinois, Const. art. 7, sec. 6.

287. Military officers may hold office.-All military officers shall continue to hold and exercise their respective offices until they shall resign or be removed according to law.

Connecticut, Const. art. 10, sec. 3. 288. Appointment of military officers.—The governor shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate appoint, all civil and military officers of the State whose appointment or election is not herein or by the laws creating the office otherwise provided for.

Maryland, Const. art. 2, sec. 10. 289. Voting on appointment of military officer.—Whenever an officer, civil or military, shall be appointed by the joint or concurrent vote of both houses or by the separate vote of either, the vote shall be viva voce and entered on the journals.

Arkansas, Const. art. 5, sec. 13. 290. Military companies may be organized subject to rules of National Guard.—The governor may issue license to bodies of men to organize, drill, and bear arms as military companies or organizations. They shall be subject, in a degree, to rules and regulations similar to those for the National Guard.

California, Stat. 1911, ch. 159, p. 325. 291. Home guard.-A home guard shall be recruited from the unorganized militia which can not be held for service in the National Guard. A board is appointed to provide for the manner and form of enlistment, organization, government, discipline, maintenance, arming, and equipment. Organizations enlisted prior to the passage of this act may be accepted.

Connecticut, Laws 1917, ch. 32, 2257; 1 Gen. Stat. 1917, secs. 797–801. Similar provisions in reference to organizations of county guards, State guards, State police, etc.: Connecticut, 1 Gen. Stat. 1918, secs. 802–9, Governor's guards; Florida, Gen. Laws 1917, ch. 7292, pp. 89–94, county guards; Georgia, Laws 1917, p. 92; Kentucky, Acts 1918, ch. 39, p. 123; Massachusetts, Gen. Acts 1918, ch. 188; Minnesota, Laws 1917, ch. 261, sec. 7; Gen. Stat. Supp. 1917, sec. 116–17; Mississippi, Laws 1917, ch. 42; Nebraska, Laws 1918, ch. 6; Nevada, 1 Rev. Laws 1912, secs. 4271, 4282; New Hampshire, Laws 1917, ch. 197; Rhode Island, Laws 1918, ch. 1659; Texas, Gen. Laws 1917, 3d called sess., ch. 20, p. 79; 4 Vernon's S. Civ. Stat. 1914, arts. 6754-66; Virginia, Acts 1918, ch. 322, p. 495.

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292. Financial support of any military organization.-Any town may, at any annual or special town meeting, make appropriations for the assistance, support, or maintenance of any military organization organized within such town and in the service of the State or United States, and any such appropriation made prior to the passage of the act by any town is validated.

Connecticut, Laws 1917, ch. 378, sec. 1, p. 2549; 1 Gen. Stat. 1918,

sec. 413. Similar provisions: Iowa, Laws 1917, ch. 207; New York, Laws 1917, ch. 235; South Dakota, Laws 1918, ch. 3, provides for State appropriation.

293. Georgia Volunteers.—Georgia Volunteers are composed of able-bodied white male residents who have actively served for five years in the organized Militia, or who served to honorable discharge in the United States Army or United States Volunteers in the SpanishAmerican War. They may be attached to the National Guard.

Georgia, 6 Park's Ann. Code 1914, secs. 1463–67. 294. Military companies may be organized.—Three or more persons may voluntarily organize and incorporate as military companies.

Indiana, 2 Burns' Ann. Stat. 1914, sec. 4293. Similar provision: Iowa, 1 Code 1897, sec. 1642.

295. Reserve militia.-When the National Guard is in service of the United States in time of war, a reserve militia may

be organized and maintained.

Minnesota, Laws 1917, ch. 400, sec. 28; Gen. Stat. Supp. 1917, sec.

2452–28. Similar provisions: Pennsylvania, Pub. Laws 1917, No. 219, p. 628; South Carolina, Acts 1908, No. 510, p. 874.

296. Philippine Constabulary organization.—Provision is made for the organization, government, discipline, compensation, etc., of the Philippine Constabulary.

Philippine Islands, Laws 3d Legis. 1915, ch. 32, secs. 1038–1119. 297. Enlistment of a mounted battalion of Porto Rico.-Instructions are given for the enlisting of a mounted battalion of Porto Rico troops under authority of the President of the United States, through the Secretary of War. The places of recruiting are given, qualifications, and other directions.

Porto Rico, Hdq. Dept. General Orders No. 34, Feb. 12, 1900. 298. Porto Rico regiment organization.---The native troops consist of two battalions to be known as the Porto Rico Regiment, United States Volunteers, composed of dismounted and mounted battalions of four companies each.

Porto Rico, Hdq. Dept. General Orders No. 38, Feb. 20, 1900. 299. Adoption or use of the name of an incorporated military organization forbidden.--No person, society, association, or corporation shall assume, adopt, or use the name of a military, ex-military, or patriotic

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organization incorporated under the laws of this or any other State or of the United States, or a name so nearly resembling as to be colorable imitation thereof.

Nevada, 1 Rev. Laws 1912, secs. 2502–3. 300. State designations not to be given to new organizations.-During the absence of organizations of National Guard, their State designations shall not be given to new organizations.

Maine, Rev. Stat. 1916, ch. 15, sec. 9. Similar provisions: Maryland, 2 Code Pub. Civil Laws 1911, art. 65, sec. 8; New Mexico, Stat. 1915, sec. 3815; New York, Laws 1909, ch. 41, sec. 8; South Carolina, 1 Code 1912, sec. 494; Tennessee, Code 1918, sec. 643a-4.

301. Unauthorized military company not entitled to aid from municipality.--No city or town shall raise or appropriate any money toward arming, equipping, uniforming, or in any other way supporting, sustaining, or providing arms, drill rooms, or armories for any unauthorized military company or organization.

Maine, Rev. Stat. 1916, ch. 15, sec. 113. Similar provisions: New Mexico, Stat. 1915, sec. 3896; New York, Laws 1909, ch. 41, sec. 239; North Dakota, 1 Comp. Laws 1913, sec. 2433.

302. Military may use silencers.-The law forbidding silencers or any device for deadening the sound of explosions of guns, pistols, or other firearms, shall not apply to military organizations authorized by law to bear arms, or to the National Guard in performance of its duty.

Maine, Rev. Stat. 1916, ch. 33, sec. 80. 303. Purchase of equipment from the United States.—The governor máy authorize the purchase of articles of uniform, equipment, military and naval supplies from the United States, according to its statutes.

New York, Laws 1914, ch. 161. 304. Commander in chief.—The governor is commander in chief of the military and naval forces of the State.

Alabama, Const. art. 5, sec. 131. Similar provisions: Arizona, Const. art 5, sec. 3; Arkansas, Const. art. 6, sec. 6; California, Const. art. 5, sec. 5; Colorado, Const. art. 4, sec. 5; Connecticut, Const. art. 4, sec. 5; Delaware, Const. art. 3, sec. 8; Florida, Const. art. 4, sec. 4; Georgia, Const. art. 5, sec. 1, par. 11; Idaho, Const. art 4, sec. 4; Illinois, Const. art 5, sec. 14; Indiana, Const. art. 5, sec. 12; Iowa, Const. art. 4, sec. 7; Kansas, Const. art 8; Kentucky, Const. sec. 75; Louisiana, Const. art. 73; Maine, Const. art. 5, secs. 7–10; Maryland, Const. art 2, sec. 8; Massachusetts, Const. ch. 2, art. 7; Michigan, Const. art 6, sec. 4; Minnesota, Const. art. 5, sec. 4; Mississippi, Const. art 5, sec. 119; art. 9, sec. 217; Missouri, Const. art. 5, sec. 7; Montana, Const. art. 14, sec. 5; Nebraska, Const. art 5, sec. 14; Nevada, Const. art 12, sec. 2; New Hampshire, Const. pt. 2, art. 50; New Jersey, Const. art. 5, sec. 6; New Mexico, Const. art. 5, sec. 4; art. 18, sec. 1; New York, Const. art. 4, sec. 4; North Carolina, Const. art. 3, sec. 8; North Dakota, Const. art. 3, sec. 75; Ohio, Const. art. 3, sec. 10; Oklahoma, Const. art. 6, sec. 6; Oregon, Const. art 5, sec. 9; Pennsylvania, Const. art. 4, sec. 7; Porto Rico, Rev. Stat. 1913, sec. 2711, par. 4; South Carolina, Const. art. 4, sec. 10; South Dakota, Const. art. 4, sec. 4; Tennessee, Const. art. 3, sec. 5; Texas, Const. art. 4, sec. 7; Utah, Const. art 7, sec. 4; Vermont, Const. art. 8; Virginia, Const. art. 5, sec. 73; Washington, Const. art. 3, sec. 8; West Virginia, Const. art. 7, sec. 12; Wisconsin, Const. art. 5, sec. 4; Wyoming, Const. art. 4, sec. 4. 305. Commander in chief in time of war.--When the governor shall,

. with the consent of the legislative assembly, be out of the State in time of war at the head of any military force thereof, he shall continue commander in chief of all the military forces of the State.

Montana, Const. art. 14, sec. J. Similar provision: Nevada, Const. art 5, sec. 18; 1 Rev. Laws 1912, sec. 2807.

306. Commander in chief to keep record.-The governor shall cause a military record to be kept of every act done by him as commander in chief of the militia.

Colorado, Rev. Stat. 1908, sec. 6148. Similar provision: Oklahoma, 2 Rev. Laws 1910, sec. 8054.

307. Calling out troops.-The governor shall have power to call out the militia to execute the laws and repel invasion.

Alabama, Const. art. 5, sec. 131. Similar provisions: Arkansas, Const. art. XI, sec. 4, when assembly is not in session; California, Const. art. 8, sec. 1; Colorado, Const. art. 4, sec. 5; Florida, Const. art. 14, sec. 4; Hawaii, Rev. Laws 1915, sec. 67; Idaho, Const. art. 4, sec. 4; Illinois, Const. art. 5, sec. 14; In na, Const. art. 5, sec. 12; Kansas, Const. art. 8, sec. 14; Louisiana, Const. art. 301; Maine, Const. art. 5, pt. 1, sec. 7, with consent of the legislature; Maryland, Const. art. 2, sec. 8; Massachusetts, Const. pt. 2, ch. 2, sec. 1, art. 7; Michigan, Const. art. 6, sec. 4; Minnesota, Const. art. 5, sec. 4; Mississippi, Const. art. 9, sec. 217; Missouri, Const. art. 5, sec. 7; Montana, Const. art. 7, sec. 6; Nebraska, Const. art. 5, sec. 14; Nevada, Const. art. 12, sec. 2; New Hampshire, Const. pt. 2, art. 50; New Mexico, Const. art. 5, sec. 4; North Carolina, Const. art. 12; North Dakota, Const. art. 3, sec. 75; Oklahoma, Const. art. 6, sec. 6; Oregon, Const. art. 5, sec. 9; Philippine Islands, Laws 3d Legis. 1915, sec. 2011; 4th Legis. 1916, sec. 2085, p. 533; South Carolina, Const. art. 13, sec. 3; South Dakota, Const. art. 4, sec. 4; Tennessee, Const. art. 3, sec. 5, when assembly declares that public safety requires it; Texas, Const. art. 4, sec. 7; Utah, Const. art. 7, sec. 4; Virginia, Const. art. 5, sec. 73; Washington, Const. art. 10, sec. 2; West Virginia, Const. art. III, sec. 12; Wyoming, Const. art. 4, sec. 4.

308. Militia may be called out by governor.-In case of actual war against the United States, or in case the President of the United States shall make a requisition on the governor of this State he may order out by draft, voluntary enlistment, or otherwise the whole or so much of the militia of this State as the public necessity demands; he may appoint the number of the draft according to the population of the several counties of the State or otherwise as he shall elect, and shall notify the sheriff of each county from which any draft is so required of the number of persons his county is to furnish.

Michigan, 1 Howell's Ann. Stat. 1912, sec. 1590.

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