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visions. The sale or other disposition of printed or written matter favoring Germany or criticising or condemning any ally of the United States is prohibited. The use or display of any sign, insignia, name, designation, title, phrase, circular, or other form of advertisement or description, written, printed, or appearing in the German language or that of any of its allies, or derived from any such language, is prohibited. The act also prohibits the sale or disposal in any manner of books, magazines, and papers printed or appearing in the German language or the language of any of its allies. Violation of the statute is punishable by a fine of $1,000 to $10,000 or by imprisonment in the penitentiary at hard labor for not less than five years nor more than ten years, or both in the discretion of the court.

Louisiana, Acts 1918, No. 177, p. 333. 121. Flag or insignia of an enemy.-Any person who during the existence of war between the United States and any other nation shall have unlawfully in his possession any flag, standard, etc., of any nation with which the United States is at war, or of any State, city, or subdivision of such nation, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

Hawaii, Laws 1918, act 19, sec. 3. Similar provisions, including display of such flag: Kansas, Gen. Stat. 1915, sec. 3365; Louisiana, Acts 1918, No. 138, p. 236; Montana, Laws 1918, ch. 11; Texas, Gen. Laws 1918, ch. 8, sec. 4.

122. Spreading false reports.—Whenever the United States shall be engaged in war any person or persons who shall wilfully make false reports or statements with intent to interfere with the operation or success of the military or naval forces of the United States or to promote the success of its enemies in the maintenance of war, shall be guilty of sedition.

Montana, Laws 1918, ch. 11. 123. Spreading false reports.—Every citizen is forbidden to spread false reports of the death of soldiers related to our citizens and other rumors detrimental to our country in its conduct of the war. All citizens are urged to use every effort to suppress such pro-German utterances.

North Dakota, Res. No. 30, Council of Defense, July 1, 1918. 124. Obtaining maps of military camps and equipment.--A person who, while the United States is at war or threatened with war, makes or attempts to make, or has in his possession or attempts to obtain any map, drawing, etc., of any military camp, fort, armory, arsenal, or building in which munitions of war are stored, or of any bridge, road, canal, dockyard, telephone or telegraph line or equipment, wireless station or equipment, railway or property, without permission of lawful authority, shall be imprisoned.

Vermont, Gen. Laws 1917, sec. 6789.

125. Destruction of property. A person is guilty of felony who in time of war wilfully or maliciously injures or destroys any article of equipment or supplies of military or naval forces of the United States or of New York, or any foreign Government allied with the United States, or any article used or maintained for the production or manufacture of any such article; or injures or destroys any building, structure, or vessel occupied by the naval or military forces of the United States, the State, or any allied foreign Government; or injures or destroys any machine intended for any such production of any railroad engine, or car or vehicle or vessel for transportation, with the intent to hinder, delay, or obstruct any military or naval operation of the United States, the State, or any allied foreign Government; or unlawfully seizes or carries away or injures or destroys or tampers with any property, with intent to hinder, obstruct, or delay any military or naval operation of the United States or of the State of New York or of any allied foreign Government. If two or more persons conspire to commit such act each is guilty.

New York, Laws 1918, ch. 337. Similar provisions: Nebraska, J.aws 1918, ch. 9; Vermont, Gen. Laws 1917, sec.

6791.

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126. Giards for property have power to search and arrest suspects.-Any member of the Home Guard, police force, special police officer, constable, sheriff, or other public officer, who may be detailed as an armed guard of any public property, or of any railroad, street or electric railway, public utility or manufacturing plant, may while on duty require any person approaching such property to explain his presence there, may search his person, place him under arrest or order him to leave the premises forthwith, and may fire upon any such person who attempts to injure such property or the person of the guard or to resist arrest or, in violation of his orders, to approach the property or to escape. The governor may issue further general or special orders affecting the powers and duties of such armed guards as in his judgment may be necessary for the public safety.

New Hampshire, Laws 1917, ch. 166. 127. Person interfering with prison guard to be arrested. Those persons who in any manner whatsoever wilfully, maliciously, and intentionally interfere with soldiers or any person in the military service of the United States while on duty as guards of prisons or of any other buildings or grounds under control of the military may be arrested by any person in the military service. All persons in the military service are authorized to arrest any and all persons interfering with the performance of their duties and to deliver the persons so arrested into the hands of the proper civil officer, together with a written statement of the offense committed and a list of the witnesses thereto.

Porto Rico, Hdq. Dept. General Orders No. 58, March 21, 1900. 128. Provoking war or violating truce or armistice. He who by unlawful acts shall provoke or furnish a pretext for a declaration of war against the Government on the part of another power, or shall expose citizens to annoyance or reprisals on their persons or property, shall be punished. If war is not actually declared, or the reprisals or annoyances do not take place, the penalty shall be in the next lower degree. Penalty shall be imposed on any person violating a truce or armistice between belligerent forces, land or naval, of the Government and a hostile nation.

Porto Rico, Penal Code, Cuba and P. R. 1900, arts. 145, 146. 129. Sabotage.--Every person who by word of mouth or writing advocates or teaches the duty, necessity, or propriety of crime or sabotage, or of violating the constitutional or statutory rights of another as a means of accomplishing industrial or political ends, or prints, publishes, edits, issues, or knowingly circulates, sells, distributes, or publicly displays any books, papers, documents, or written matter in any form containing or advocating, advising, or teaching the doctrine that industrial or political ends or of violating the rights of another should be brought about by crime or sabotage or by the violation of the rights of another, or openly, wilfully and deliberately justifies by word of mouth or writing the commission or attempt to commit crime or sabotage or of violating the constitutional rights of another, is guilty of felony. The officers or agents of any association, corporation, or organization who do or perform any of the acts of sabotage are guilty of the commission of the act. Two or more persons assembling for the purpose of advocating or teaching the doctrine that industrial or political ends should be brought about by crime or sabotage, or the violating of rights of another, are guilty of felony. Every person, corporation, association, or organization who wilfully and maliciously injures or destroys the property, or violates the constitutional or statutory rights of another, as a means of accomplishing industrial or political ends, is guilty of sabotage.

Arizona, Laws 1918, ch. 13, pp. 51, 52. Similar provisione: Montana, Laws 1918, ch.7; South Dakota, Laws 1918, ch.38.

130. Sedition. Any person who, at any timo or place within the Territory of Hawaii, uses any language in the presence or hearing of another of or concerning the Government of the United States or the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps, which shall be contemptuous, disloyal, or abusive in its character or calculated to bring into disrepute or contempt either said Government or said organization, or shall commit any act or use any language of such disloyal nature

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as shall be reasonably calculated to cause a breach of the peace, or who shall use such language concerning the flag or uniform of the United States, or shall individually or jointly with others or as a part of a general propaganda make, publish, or circulate any book, picture, etc., to bring any such organization into contempt or shall desecrate the flag, or shall endeavor to discourage or prevent vigorous prosecution of the war by the United States or shall make, publish, or circulate any book, picture, or paper for such purpose, shall be guilty of a felony.

Hawaii, Laws 1918, act 19, sec. 1. Similar provisions: Montana, Laws 1918, ch. 11; Texas, Gen. Laws 1918, ch. 8, secs. 1, 2.

131. Sedition.-Any person who during the existence of war between the United States and any other nation or nations uses language contemptuous or abusive of any nation or nations with which the United States is allied in the prosecution of said war or concerning any flag, standard, etc., of any such nation or the uniform of its Army, Navy, or Marine Corps, or who shall, alone or with others, make, publish, or circulate any book, writing, etc., calculated to bring into disrepute any such allied nation or its flag or who shall desecrate such flag, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

Hawaii, Laws 1918, act 19, sec. 5. 132. Sedition. Whenever the United States shall be engaged in war any person or persons who shall wilfully cause or attempt to cause dissatisfaction in the military or naval forces of the United States, or by any means obstruct or attempt to obstruct the operation of the national selective draft law or the recruiting or enlistment of the United States to the injury of the military or naval service, shall be guilty of sedition and may be punished by a fine from $200 to $20,000, or imprisonment in the State prison from one to twenty years, or both.

Montana, Laws 1918, ch. 11. 133. Sedition ; definition and penalty.-Any person may be fined or imprisoned in jail or the penitentiary for sedition who shall (a) speak, write, print, publish, or circulate any word or statement or do any act encouraging disloyalty to the United States or of a nature reasonably calculated to bring into disrepute the United States; or (6) speak, write, print, publish, or circulate any statement tending to cause insurrection or sedition; or (c) tend to incite resistance to lawful authority; or (d) interfere with the enlistment, mobilization, equipment, movement, or transportation of any of the naval or military forces of the United States; or (e) obstruct or discourage any activities of the State or Federal Government in the prosecution of the war; or (f) obstruct or discourage any activities having for its purpose to render aid or comfort to the armed forces of the Nation during the

or any

war; or (g) obstruct or discourage the lawful raising of funds for the national defense, whether in the form of subscription to loans or the sale of Government securities; or (h) conceal, hoard, or destroy any food supplies of a character declared by or for the President as necessary for the use of the armed forces of the United States or the forces of the allies of the United States; or (i) interfere with or discourage the enlistment of persons into the military or naval forces of the United States or any auxiliary organizations, including the Red Cross; or (j) speak, write, print, publish, or circulate any statement or perform any act in violation of the espionage bill of Congress

authorized executive order of the President; or (k) call, arrange for, hold, or participate in any public meeting with the avowed purpose of organizing resistance to the Government of the United States; or (1) speak, write, print, publish, or circulate any statement encouraging the abandonment of any enterprises, work, or employment in any of the activities necessary for the efficient prosecution of the war; or (m) being physically able to work and not engaged in any useful occupation refuse employment, or remaining habitually idle when useful employment is obtainable. Whoever shall aid, abet, or procure any person to commit any such act may be punished the same as the principal offender. Concealment of such offense shall also be punishable.

Nebraska, Laws 1918, ch. 5, secs. 1-3. 134. Persons indicted or accused of sedition shall not address the public without permission.-No person against whom an indictment has been returned or any information has been filed for sedition shall, pending hearing upon such indictment or information, act as teacher, lecturer, minister, preacher, priest, editor, publisher, or instructor in any capacity, unless the district court or judge before whom such case is pending, upon an application and showing and on such terms as to the court may seem proper, permits such person to act, and the court may in its discretion revoke such permit. In the absence of the district judge for ten days after application, the county judge may grant a permit until next term of the district court.

Nebraska, Laws 1918, ch. 5, sec. 5. 135. Persons convicted of sedition shall not address the public.-No person who has been convicted of sedition shall after such conviction act as teacher, lecturer, minister, preacher, or priest, or instructor in any capacity during the period of the war.

Nebraska, Laws 1918, ch. 5, sec. 4. 136. Inciting insurrection or sedition. If any person shall incite an insurrection or sedition amongst any portion or class of the population of this State, or shall attempt, by writing, speaking, or by any other means, to incite such insurrection or sedition, the

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