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the lighthouse and necessary generators) so that nature can once more return to this island.

3. That the stone and concrete be made into blocks for a seawall as a protective barrier for the return of fish, sea otters, sea lions, and other creatures of the sea and air who would take shelter here.

4. That the steel bars and plates be given to children's playgrounds and parks across this land, to be made into forms and structures which the children can climb upon and enjoy.

5. That because we lost a young sister here, and because this island has been cleansed and declared sacred ground by many of our traditional leaders, it be allowed to remain as such forever.

6. That one small roundhouse be erected, to be used once yearly, each time by representatives of a different tribe, in a ceremony of earth renewal and purification to re-dedicate it to all who love and respect our earth.

Let this proposal be acted upon immediately! Let this be a first step toward sane policies and practices regarding nature and our environment. Let us set an example that all nations of this earth can approve and accept. We must restore all that has been destroyed by greed and ignorance.

In 1976, on the 200th Anniversary of the United States of America, let us truly celebrate. Let us know that the future unborn generations will remember us with love.

This proposal then, we offer to the citizens of this country, hoping that by its acceptance a new era of understanding and co-operation between a people of varied cultural backgrounds can at last begin.

Hon. ROY A. TAYLOR,

INDIANS OF ALL TRIBES,

San Francisco, Calif., August 17, 1971.

Chairman, Subcommittee on Parks and Recreation, House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House Office Building, Washington, D.C. DEAR CONGRESSMAN TAYLOR: We are writing your office in regard to the Congressional hearing here in San Francisco on August 9, 1971 about the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco and Marin Counties, California. Discussed at the hearing was H.R. 9498, introduced in the House on June 29, 1971 and S. 2342, introduced on July 29, 1971.

H.R. 9498 and S. 2342 excluded Alcatraz Island, while H.R. 10220 did include the island, but did not elaborate. Since our proposal was constructed prior to the introduction of these three bills, we had anticipated to testify about and ask that our proposal be incorporated into the legislation that was introduced on February 2, 1971, H.R. 3238, in place of, specifically Sections 9 and 10 of H.R. 3238. We were caught somewhat short by the three new bills and we think that our testimony reflected this. We still ask that our proposal be incorporated in full and to offer our explanation why we think it is beneficial and workable. What we are requesting is the inclusion of Alcatraz Island within the Golden Gate National Recreational Area, but as a separate unit under the jurisdiction and management of the Indian People. A good example would be the Vedanta Society being specifically named for special trust in the legislation which set up the Point Reyes National Seashore. They maintain control of all the land which they had interest in before the Seashore was established. The People for a Golden Gate National Recreation Area are supporting the Audubon Society in maintaining control over Canyon Ranch even though it falls within the boundaries of the proposed National Recreation Area. It is consistant with these positions to support and even legislate Indian sponsorship of Alcatraz Island.

The Island has always been a part of our heritage and lately a place of refurge of some of our people during the era of the missionaries. Later a place of confinement for some of our men when it was a military prison. And recently again a place of refuge for nineteen months. During this time the Island was purified and made sacred. Babies were born and so Life began there once more. Also a new awareness began, the ideas and dreams of a people again began to instill a pride and our people began to hold their heads high and smile with their eyes. We cannot begin to say all the things that the Island means to us. So it is this in mind we respectfully ask that the Island be made free once more. Our proposal would again have the Island a symbol of Peace

and Life of which our people regard as the ultimate monument not only for our people, but all people of the world. We also ask that this letter be considered additional testimony and be recorded as such.

Thank you,

INDIANS OF ALL TRIBES.

Mr. TAYLOR. Eliese LaRue, accompanied by Diane Hunter.

STATEMENT OF MRS. DIANE HUNTER, OUTER RICHMOND NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION, ON BEHALF OF ELIESE LA RUE

Mrs. HUNTER. I am Diane Hunter.

Mr. TAYLOR. Will Miss LaRue not be here then?

Mrs. HUNTER. No. I am speaking for her. I am representing the Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association. My husband, Kenneth, was its founder and first chairman.

Our young neighborhood association has participated in many battles to preserve or upgrade sites proposed for inclusion in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The most notable was the diversion of plans to construct on the headlands of the Golden Gate a Federal records warehouse which would have been as large as two football fields. Due to our efforts and those of many others, this building will be placed in an industrial area, where it belongs, down the peninsula.

Fort Miley, where the records warehouse was planned, is a crucial open-space buffer between the Veterans' Administration hospital and the Palace of the Legion of Honor. If Fort Miley is not designated for park and recreation use by including it in the National Recreation Area, then our battle of Fort Miley most likely will be lost to those interests who view all undeveloped undesignated urban public lands as cheap building sites.

The Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association had its inception in neighborhood concern about the care and maintenance of Sutro Heights Park which you may have visited yesterday. Today all that remains of this past glory are the two lion statues and the battered wellhouse. We do not expect this park will be restored to its previous victorian formal elegance but we do hope its inclusion in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area would afford better care for this charming and uniquely situated park with its spectacular views of the coastline.

The Sutro Baths area is once again open for a view of the coastline. It is now in private ownership and is threatened with development of an apartment complex which would block both views and access to the coastline. Large-scale construction would very likely drive away the sea lions off the rocks of the coast. The Land's End area affords magnificent views. This area is also in an advanced state of neglect. There are numerous hiking trails here in various degrees of disrepair and safety. However, wildlife, especially birds, abound. Considering the peril to Sutro Baths and Fort Miley, and recognizing that the City Recreation and Park Department apparently will never have the manpower or equipment resources to properly manage these parcels entrusted to its care in our neighborhood, the Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association was the first organiza

tion to officially call for the creation of a Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

The neighbors of the outer Richmond district have very strong, protective feelings about the historic and national open space lands near us. We would urge these lands to be included in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

Mr. TAYLOR. Thank you very much.

(Prepared statement of Mrs. Hunter follows:)

STATEMENT OF MRS. DIANE HUNTER, OUTER RICHMOND NEIGHBORHOOD

ASSOCIATION

I am Mrs. Diane Hunter, representing the Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association. My husband, Kenneth, was its founder and first chairman.

Our young Neighborhood Association has participated in many battles to preserve or upgrade sites proposed for inclusion in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The most notable was the diversion of plans to construct on the headlands of the Golden Gate a federal records warehouse which would have been as large as two football fields. Due to our efforts, and those of many others, this building will be placed in an industrial area, where it belongs, down the Peninsula.

Ft. Miley, where the records warehouse was planned, is a crucial open space buffer between the Veterans Administration Hospital and the Palace of the Legion of Honor. If Ft. Miley is not designated for park and recreational use by including it in the National Recreation Area, then our next Battle of Ft. Miley most likely will be lost to those interests who view all undeveloped, undesignated urban public lands as cheap building sites.

The Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association had its inception in neighborhood concern about the care and maintenance of Sutro Heights Park. In the late 1800's this park was the elegant estate of San Francisco's philanthropic Mayor, Adolph Sutro. Guests at Sutro Heights included President Benjamin Harrison, poet Oscar Wilde, William Jennings Bryan, and Andrew Carnegie. Open to the public during vising hours, the estate contained formal gardens, riding stables, much statuary, exotic plants, and the Mayor's home. Today, all that remains of this past glory are the two lion statues, plus two other damaged statues, and the battered well house (gazebo). We do not expect this park will be restored to its previous Victorian formal elegance, but we do hope that its inclusion in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area would afford better care for this charming and uniquely situated park with its spectacular views of the coast line.

In Mayor Sutro's time, the area which is now referred to as Sutro Baths contained an aquarium, swimming pool, and two trout ponds. In later years buildings containing a museum, indoor baths, and an ice skating rink were constructed. This has all been destroyed, leaving a skeleton of the baths. The Sutro Baths site is once again open for views of the coastline and Seal Rocks, where the sea lions winter, as well as for access to Fishermen's Rock-a favorite of striped bass fishermen. This land is now in private ownership, and is threatened with development of an apartment complex which would block both views and access to the coastline. Large scale construction would very likely drive away the sea lions.

The Lands End area affords magnificent views to Point Reyes, Point Bonita, and the Marin Headlands to the north, San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate Bridge to the east, and the Golden Gate strait and narrows below. The remains of several ships which met with disaster here can be seen at low tide. The hill was the terminal for the first electric telegraph in California; its companion station, to which information on incoming ships was relayed, was six miles away on Telegraph Hill. Today this area is in an advanced stage of neglect. There are numerous hiking trails here in varying degrees of disrepair and safety. Wildlife, especially birds, abound.

Considering the peril to the Sutro Baths and Ft. Miley, and recognizing that the City Recreation and Park Department apparently will never have the manpower or equipment resources to properly manage those parcels entrusted to

its care in our neighborhood, the Outer Richmond Neighborhood Association was the first organization to officially call for the creation of a Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

The neighbors of the Outer Richmond District have very strong, protective feelings about the historic and natural open space lands near us: Ocean Beach, Sutro Heights Park, the Sutro Baths area including the Cliff House, Lands End, Ft. Miley, and Lincoln Park. We urge inclusion of all of these areas in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in order that they will be always accessible to residents and visitors alike for hiking, bicycling, golf, beachcombing, fishing, photography, and nature study.

Mr. TAYLOR. Let me say just one word to Mr. Trudell back in the back.

I would just like to emphasize that I for one am very proud of our Indian citizens. Most are good citizens. I believe that Indians have more equities in their favor than any other ethnic group. They have been mistreated in the past and there are wrongs of yesterday and many of us are on the Indian Affairs Subcommittee in the House Interior Committee and we are anxious to help correct the wrongs of yesterday.

Mr. CLAUSEN. Would the Chairman yield?

Mr. TAYLOR. I will be glad to yield to the gentleman from California.

Mr. CLAUSEN. In addition to what the Chairman has said, there are a number of us in the Congress that are advancing the concept that there is a need to develop Indian cultural centers in many of the sections throughout the Nation, and I will predict without any reservation that that kind of program will come into being in the not too distant future; and I would personally welcome some recommendations and ideas long those lines because I have this entire north coast of California.

We have done a tremendous job in advancing the rural Indian health programs, and it is all geared toward helping them help themselves, and I know that the Commissioner of Indian Affairs has been with me on two or three occasions. We are going into Rancharias; we are going into the reservations.

We would like to get these people out from under the institutionalization process that has taken place in the past, so I think you are going to find the Congress and many people more receptive in the future.

Mr. TAYLOR. Mr. Roger T. Panek, accompanied by Constance M. Johnstone. On deck, Jerry Friedman.

STATEMENT OF ROGER T. PANEK, COCHAIRMAN, MARIN ALTERNATIVE; ACCOMPANIED BY CONSTANCE M. JOHNSTONE

Mr. PANEK. Mr. Chairman, my name is Roger Panek. I represent Marin Alternative which is a citizens group representing about 850 people in Marin County. I am cochairman of the Environmental Task Force and it is our duty to look after environmental preservation in Marin County and indeed in the whole Bay Area.

We would like to express our strong support for H.R. 9498, and I would just like to make a few succinct comments which will express our views.

We believe the Presidio area should be a national recreation area.

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However, the Marin area should be preserved as a national park. We feel that this proposal will benefit the people in the area as well as tourists coming in from outside.

Marin County has been characterized as the lungs of the Bay Area. This proposal will do much to allow it to continue to be such. I would like to make six specific proposals: No. 1, that the Olema area be either included or excluded intact as a natural community, not divided.

No. 2: We believe that public transportation should serve the area ultimately by railroad, in the interim probably by buses. We think that automobiles should be excluded to the greatest extent possible. We think intrapark transportation should be provided with minibuses, elephant trains and possibly bicycle rentals.

No. 3: We feel that visitor facilities should be kept to a minimum. We want no hotels or motels in the area. We feel these are incompatible uses. Campgrounds will certainly be all right but they should be kept to a minimum as well.

No. 4: We feel that Bolinas Lagoon, Audubon Canyon Ranch, and Duxbury Reef should be excluded from these proposals as we feel they will be better protected under local jurisdiction.

No. 5: We believe that present agricultural uses in the area should be sustained. They seem to be a compatible and natural use of the land.

And, finally, we feel that a citizens' advisory committee might well be appointed to help advise the committee on this proposal. Thank you.

Mr. TAYLOR. Thank you. Those are very fine suggestions.
(Prepared statement of Roger T. Panek follows:)

STATEMENT OF ROGER T. PANEK, COCHAIRMAN, MARIN ALTERNATIVE,
CITIZENS GROUP

In regard to the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, the Marin Alternative, composed of some 850 people in Marin County, recommends the following: That the current Presidio area in San Francisco as recommended in Bill HR 9498, be commissioned a National Recreation area, to the enormous benefit of the people of San Francisco and environs;

That the Marin County land as designated in Bill HR 9498 be commissioned as a National Park area, for the enhancement of living conditions for residents of the Bay Area. Someone once called Marin County the "lung of the Bay Area"-and we feel that this important area, designated as a National Park, will maintain this vital open space preserve.

With regard to the proposed recreation and park areas, we would like to further recommend:

1. Stinson Beach-Olema areas: We believe that the continuity associated with the establishment of this park will be one of its most outstanding features. We therefore urge that the Olema Valley be included in the National Park Area. We would call particular attention to the communities of Stinson Beach and Olema and recommend that these towns be either included or excluded intact, designated as Historic Districts and zoned and protected accordingly.

2. Transportation accessibility and internal circulation: We believe public transportation access should ultimately be provided by a railway network. In the interim a bus service should provide exclusive access over the existing roads. We would like included a section calling for establishment of a controlled internal circulation system (utilizing minibuses or similar vehicles) to link trailheads, the scenic areas in the national park area, and the railway network.

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