The Naturalist, Volúmenes1-2

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Pierce and Parker, and Carter and Hendee, 1831
 

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Página 29 - Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well, whose branches run over the wall : the archers have sorely grieved him, and shot at him, and hated him: but his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were made strong by the hands of the Mighty God of Jacob...
Página 149 - And of an humbler growth, the other tall, And throwing up into the darkest gloom Of neighbouring cypress or more sable yew Her silver globes, light as the foamy surf That the wind severs from the broken wave ; The lilac, various in array, now white, Now sanguine, and her beauteous head now set With purple spikes pyramidal, as if Studious of ornament, yet unresolved Which hue she most approved, she chose them all...
Página 159 - My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew, as the small rain upon the tender herb, and as the showers upon the grass : Because I will publish the name of the Lord: ascribe ye greatness unto our God.
Página 360 - His eye kindles at the sight, and balancing himself with half-opened wings, on the branch, he watches the result. Down, rapid as an arrow from heaven, descends the distant object of his attention, the roar of its wings reaching the ear as it disappears in the deep, making the surge foam around.
Página 156 - Where cooling vapours breathe along the mead, The patient fisher takes his silent stand, Intent, his angle trembling in his hand : With looks unmoved, he hopes the scaly breed, And eyes the dancing cork and bending reed.
Página 77 - Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave ; Learn of the little Nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale. Here too all forms of social union find, And hence let Reason, late, instruct mankind : Here subterranean works and cities see ; There towns aerial on the waving tree.
Página 159 - I will be as the dew unto Israel : he shall grow as the lily, and cast forth his roots as Lebanon.
Página 360 - ... coursing along the sands ; trains of ducks streaming over the surface; silent and watchful cranes, intent and wading; clamorous crows and all the winged multitudes that subsist by the bounty of this vast liquid magazine of Nature. High over all these hovers one whose action instantly arrests all his attention.
Página 189 - Then," said the rose, with deepened glow, " On me another grace bestow." The spirit paused, in silent thought, — What grace was there that flower had not ? 'Twas but a moment, — o'er the rose A veil of moss the angel throws, And robed in nature's simplest weed. Could there a flower that rose exceed ? The Rose.
Página 348 - The wool came from the East Indies to London; from London it went to Lancashire, where it was manufactured into yarn; from Manchester it was sent to Paisley, where it was woven; it was sent to Ayrshire next, where it was tamboured; it...

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