Crisis Management in the Food and Drinks Industry: A Practical Approach

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Springer Science & Business Media, 2006 M06 18 - 264 páginas

Few titles could be timelier than the second edition of Crisis Management in the Food and Drinks Industry – A Practical Approach. The world is worrying about a human pandemic arising from the avian flu epidemic that is spreading from the Far East, the implications of which could be as great for the food industry as were the outbreaks of foot and mouth disease and BSE.

This practical and greatly expanded edition by media and public relations veteran Colin Doeg focuses on the communications aspects of dealing with a crisis. It is global in its coverage of the subject, reviewing practices and requirements in countries ranging from the USA and the UK to Australia and New Zealand.

Doeg offers advice ranging from preparing for the unthinkable to the dramatic expansion of the Internet, avoiding being caught off-guard by a situation, the ramifications of product tampering and managing an actual crisis.

Advice is also offered on dealing with extremist organizations and terrorist threats as well as bioterrorism – "a clear and present danger" – and a number of problems facing the food industry, including the practice of selling meat unfit for human consumption and the threat posed by the increasing toxicity of fish due to the rising pollution of the world’s oceans.

In a special late chapter – written only three months before publication – the author looks ahead to events which he believes will shape the world of crisis management in the future, including the empowering influence of the Internet during the 2004 Asian Tsunami, the discovery of the illegal dye Sudan 1 (Red) in millions of food products and the fears of a pandemic arising from the spreading outbreak of avian flu.

Examples of typical documents like a crisis plan for a business, a crisis checklist, a press release announcing a product recall, an announcement to employees and a checklist for anyone dealing with a threatening phone call are provided. Also included is a list of sources of information and assistance in the event of a product crisis.

Crisis Management in the Food and Drinks Industry is the only title dealing specifically with this crucial subject in relation to the food industry. As such, it is relevant not only to those in the food industry, but also to marketing and senior management in general in the fields of agriculture, public health and law enforcement.

 

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Contenido

The anatomy of a crisis
1
Protecting your brands and reputation
11
21 Designing hazards out of a system
16
22 Need for risk assessment procedures
19
23 Benefits of due diligence
20
25 Benefits of corporate citizenship
21
Preparing for the unthinkable
23
31 Threats to take into account
24
1216 Other types of crises
126
Diet and health
129
131 Are fish a crisis waiting to surface?
136
Problems facing the food industry
143
141 Unfit meat is persistent problem
148
142 New member states pose problem for EU
153
Dealing with extremist organizations and terrorist threats
155
Bioterrorism a clear and present danger
167

32 First hint of a serious problem
26
33 Sources of help and advice
28
34 Checklist for crisis team
30
35 No magic solutions
32
36 Crisis what crisis?
33
37 Feel and instinct
34
The Internet a twoedged sword
37
Tactics to avoid being caught offguard
49
Product tampering a constant threat
57
61 Keeping issues in perspective
58
Issues tracking and management
65
71 An orchestrated campaign
66
72 A suspect ingredient
68
73 Putting matters in perspective
70
Meeting the media
73
81 Presentation skills
76
82 Reacting to a problem
77
84 Video news releases
90
85 Video bites
91
Do I need help?
93
Sources of technical help
99
The powers of enforcement authorities
105
Managing a crisis
113
121 Immediate actions
114
122 Is a public recall really necessary?
115
123 Directing media enquiries
116
124 Beware of this information channel
117
125 Preparing a media statement
118
126 Going live
120
127 Be prepared for the treatment
122
1210 Employees can be your best ambassadors
123
1213 Fixing the blame
124
1214 Insurance cover
125
Significant crises
175
172 The company that fought back
177
173 Anatomy of a crisis
185
174 The scandal that sucked in an industry
186
175 The crisis that was described as a wakeup call for meat industry
188
Interesting case histories
193
182 The crisis that ravaged the Far East
197
183 The crisis that took the fizz out of a softdrinks giant
200
184 The fiasco that humiliated a government
202
185 A crisis that found a government wanting
204
186 The crisis that was unique
212
187 A crisis delayed by circumstances
214
188 Red alert
215
189 A lesson in protection
216
1810 The Spanish cooking oil scandal
217
1811 Ye powers of entry
218
Events that will shape the future
219
1911 Facts behind illegal dye
220
1912 Sudan 1 timeline
224
192 New bird flu outbreaks spark fears of pandemic
226
193 Disaster in which the Internet and peoples initiative were supreme
229
194 Unique laws force mercury warning
232
195 End for GM crops in the UK?
233
Typical crisis plan
235
Typical crisis checklist
239
Typical press release and Question and Answer Sheet
241
Typical press advertisement
245
Model announcement to employees
249
Threatening phone call checklist
251
Sources of information and assistance
253
Glossary of frequently used abbreviations
259
Index
261
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Acerca del autor (2006)

Colin Doeg started in journalism on a local newspaper in London (UK), covering the attacks by flying bombs and rockets during the last World War on the neighbourhood in which he lived. Subsequently he went into public relations working for such blue chip companies as Ford Motor Company, Reed International, Brooke Bond Group and Unilever Plc. Now retired, he works as a consultant.

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