Observations on the Formation and Management of Useful and Ornamental Plantations: On the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening; and on Gaining and Embanking Land from Rivers Or the Sea

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Archibald Constable, 1804 - 342 páginas
 

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Página 183 - Lordfhip fixes upon thirty fhillings each a* the price of trees which fhould be cut down ; as, if they be cut before they arrive at that value, or if they be allowed to remain till they will fell for a much higher price, the proprietor of the foil on which they grow will be a lofer. He alfo mentions its being the general opinion ' that it is more profitable to fell oak wood at fifty or fixty years growth, than to let it ftand for navy timber to eighty or a hundred, owing to the low price that is...
Página 117 - Foíler'd thus, The cradled hero gains from female care His future vigour ; but that vigour felt, He fprings indignant from his nurfe's arms, He nods the plumy creft, he (hakes the fpear, And is that awful thing which Heav'n ordain'd The fcourge of tyrants, and his country's pride.
Página 181 - ... of decline. A TIMBERED eftate fhould frequently be gone over, by fome perfon of judgement ; who, let the price and demand for timber be what they may, ought to mark every tree which wears the appearance of decay. If the demand be brifk, and the price high, he ought to go two fteps farther, and mark not only fuch as are full grown, but fuch, alfo, as are near perfection ; for the intereft of the money, the difencumbrance of the Hedge and the neighbouring young timbers, and the comparative advantages...
Página 182 - The following observations contain the reason for this belief. If profit is considered, every tree of every kind ought to be cut down and sold, when the annual increase in value of the tree, by its growth, is...
Página 224 - ... seal, with a clump, a belt, and a piece of made water, would have fully expressed the whole of their science, and have served for a model as well
Página 124 - ... ground where they are to grow ; for timber of all thofe trees which are tranfplanted is not near fo valuable as that of the trees from acorns.
Página 21 - Wood (a fubjedt we -fliall fpeak to particularly in the courfe of this chapter) in which Underwood is alfo propagated, is thirty feet or upwards. Suppofing trees to ftand at two rods (33 feet, the diftance we recommend they fhould ftand at in fuch a plantation), each ftatute acre would contain 40 trees ; confequently the building of a feventy-four gun ftiip would clear, of fuch Woodland, the timber of 50 acres.
Página 182 - BUT while we thus hold out the difad vantages of fuffering timber to fland until it be overgrown, it is far from our intention to recommend, or even countenance, a premature felling...
Página 200 - ... would be but a trifling object. . • An estate, though there were little more room for wood on it than the hedgerows, would soon be greatly heightened in value by a person of this kind. And if such a general inspector of wood were considered as essential to an estate as a steward, I am persuaded it would remove bad planting and bad management, and prove of very great advantage to the landed interest and the nation at large. ' It may be thought by some, that a common : u ward is sufficient for...
Página 124 - ... after, yet are now decaying, when thofe which remain in the places where they came up from the acorns, are .ftill very thriving, and have not the leaft fign of decay. Therefore, whoever...

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