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we shall select a few of the more striking ones for the amusement of the reader.

The figure of an Indian juggler was represented in the act of throwing up two balls ; on spinning the card, and, at the same time, altering the position of the circle, in the manner already described, three, and afterwards four, became visible. When the card revolved upon its original axis, two of the balls on the reverse side coincided with the two painted on the front, so that during the revolution they fell upon the same spot on the retina, and therefore produced a single impression; but as soon as the position of the card was changed, these spots were brought upon different points, and consequently produced separate and independent images.

The next subject which we shall describe produced a considerable degree of merriment. The vicar inspected the drawing, and observed that he saw a pulpit placed on the banks of a pond; the card was made to spin, when a tailor was seen haranguing from the former, and a goose, at the same instant, fluttering over the

The circle was now suddenly shifted, and the vicar was desired to state what he saw : -“ Why, bless me !" exclaimed Mr. Twad

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dleton, “ the tailor is justly served, he is ducked in the pond, while the goose has taken his place in the pulpit.”

Fearing that we may have exhausted the patience of our reader, we shall only relate one more example. It was a Turk, who, by means of the expedient we are illustrating, was made to draw his sabre, and cut off the head of his antagonist, which immediately fell into the hands of the decapitated person, who, like St. Denys, appeared as if walking off with perfect indifference.

66 You must admit,” said Mrs. Seymour, " that these optical effects are no less novel than they are extraordinary; and I have still an expedient for extending them. It is my intention to connect the movable circle, by means of a spring, with the frame, so that when I shall have changed its position by pulling the strings, the card may be enabled to recover its original position. I shall thus be capable of producing a see-saw motion, which will greatly heighten the effects of certain subjects. In this manner a sailor may be made to row a boat, a dandy to make a bow," &c.

“ Madam,” said the vicar, “ you have already exhibited such proofs of talent, that I can readily believe you capable of accomplishing the design you propose ; but I hope that, amidst all your improvements, you will still keep in view your first and most laudable design, that of rendering it subservient to classical illustration.

CHAP. II.

THE VICAR'S SERMON. THE EMIGRATION OF MISS

RYLAND AND HER CRONIES. VILLAGE PREPARATIONS FOR THE RECEPTION OF MR. BEACHAM AND HIS BRIDE.THE PROCESSION. MR. TWADDLETON ADDRESSES THE ASSEMBLY.-THE MAJOR AND HIS VISITORS ARE ACCOMPANIED BY MR. SEYMOUR AND THE VICAR, TO SUPERINTEND THE ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE ENSUING FESTIVITIES. -THE CURIOUS DISCUSSIONS WHICH TOOK PLACE ON THAT OCCASION. —THE ORIGIN OF THE SWING,

MERRY-ANDREWS. TRAGETOURS. OTHER ITINERANT SONS OF COMUS. THE DINNER AT THE HALL.-THE LEARNED CONTROVERSY WHICH WAS MAINTAINED WITH RESPECT TO THE ORIGIN OF CHESS, AND SOME OTHER GAMES.

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THE reader will remember that Will Snaffle the village saddler, and Sam Tickle the watchmaker, had been arrested for debts, contracted in the pursuit of their visionary schemes, and thrown into gaol. To the delight and great astonishment, however, of themselves and friends, their incarceration was but of short duration. They had been released through the interposition of some kind but unknown friend; for the

hand thus generously stretched out in the hour of need had been concealed with studied caution. Acquainted as we are with the character of Mr. Twaddleton, we have little doubt but that, through his kindness, this arrangement had been accomplished; and our opinion was greatly strengthened upon hearing the sermon which he delivered on the Sunday after their liberation. His text was taken from the 38th chapter of Ecclesiasticus, verses 24, 25, &c.; and so exactly did it express the vicar's sentiments on the subject of scientific education, that we cannot resist the satisfaction of quoting it:-“ The wisdom of a learned man cometh by opportunity of leisure ; and he that hath little business shall become wise. How can he get wisdom that holdeth the plough, and that glorieth in the goad, that driveth oxen, and is occupied in their labours, and whose talk is of bullocks ? - So every carpenter, and workmaster, that laboureth night and day

All these trust to their hands, and every one is wise in his work. Without these cannot a city be inhabited ; and they shall not dwell where they will, nor go up and down. They shall not be sought for in public counsel, nor sit high in the congregation ; they shall not sit on the judge's

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