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WITH AX

IMPROVED SYNTAX.

PART I.

COMPREHENDING AT ONE VIEW WHAT IS NECESSARY

TO BE COMMITTED TO MEMORY.

PART II,

CONTAINING A RECAPITULATION, WITH VARIOUB

ILLUSTRATIONS AND

CRITICAL REMARKS.

DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS,

BY J. M. PUTNAM

Stereotyped by Fisk & Chase, Concord, N. A

Concord, N. D.
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY JACOB B. MOORE,

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DISTRIOT OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE, to wit.

District Clerk's Office, ****** BI

REIT REMEMBERED, that on the twelfth day of July, A. D.
D 1828, in the fifty-third year of the Independence of the United
States of America, JACOB B. MOORE of the said district, has de-

posited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claimg as proprietor, in the words, following, to wit:

English Grammar, with an Improved Syntax. Part 1. Comprehending at one view what is necessary to be committed to memory. Part II. Containing a recapitulation, with various illustrations and critical remarks. Designed for the use of schools, By J. M. Putnam. Second edition."

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled "An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;" and also to an act, entitled Shan act supplementary to an act entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies; during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other prints.”

CHARLES W. CUTTER,

Clerk of the District of New-Hampshire
A true copy-Attest,

CHARLES W. CUTTER, Clerk.

PREFACE
TO THE FIRST EDITION.

BEVERAL elementary works on English Grammar having already appeared before the public, the necessity and expediency of adding another to their number may perhaps be doubted. The ability, however, with which some eminent authors have treated this subject, does not preclude the possibility of further improvements. Alí sciences must advance by slow degrees towards perfection. The author believes that he has done something, at least, to elucidate the science of English Grammar, or he would not presume to give publicity to the result of his labors.

In the first part of this work, every thing relating to the subject of English Grammar has been embodied, which was deemed important for the learner to commit to memory. The object in making this arrangement was, to relieve the instructer from the trouble of marking detached passages, and to encourage the pupil by showing him, at one view, how small a tax is laid on his patience, in this least interesting part of his study. The ground which he is to go over, he sees at once, is of very limited extent; and the reflection that by diligent and persevering efforts, he can accomplish in a very short time, the task of committing, will inspire him with fortitude in the undertaking, and render his progress more rapid and pleasing.

In the second part of the work, the elements of the science are exhibited in a more full and extended form, accompanied with a variety of familiar illustrations. Terms and distinctions, in a style adapted to the capacity of the youthful mind, are carefully explained. Words of doubtful construction, whose nature and of fice are changed on account of the different connexions which they sustain in a sentence, have received special attention; and their various applications have been illustrated by familiar examples. No pains have been spared to render the whole subject intelligible

to divegt it of mystery and difficulty and to make it an interesting and useful study.'

The improvements in syntax, it is believed, are of considerable importance. Rules have been added, by which the pupil will be able to parse many difficult sentences and phrases which have always, particularly to young beginners, been a source of perplexity and discouragement. The fact is not to be denied, for every teacher bas felt its truth, that many sentences which are unexceptionable

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