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AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS OF THE SEVERAL STATES IN 1863—(CONTINUED).

INDIAN CORN, BARLEY, IMPROVED LAND, AND YOUNG CATTLE.

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Alabama.. 30.200.000 2,013,333 15 $1.14 15.923 9,000 Arkansas .... 25,750,000 919,642 28 92 16,810 4.000 California,... 1.805.000 831.521 41.4

1,343,689 12,285,000 Connecticut.. 1.950,000 62,500 31.2 1.30 3,898,411 25,000 Delaware... 3,200.000 177,777 18 70 6,579 6,000 Florida... 8,100,000 276,785) 11.2 1.45 5,280 4,000 Georgia.. 27,500,000 2,500,000 11 1.21 15,587 12,300 Illinois... 121,500,000 5,237,068 23.2

1,848,557 1,250,000 Indiana. 73,000,000 3,146,551 23.2 701 605,795 411,000 Jowa...... 78,500,000 2,361,457 33.2

918,635 1,203,000 Kansas....... 24,500,000 506,198 48.4

29,015 25,000 Kentucky.... 51,500,000 2,060,000 25

66 190,400 304,000 Louisiana ... 16,850,000 674,000 25

1.09

6,153 Maine...... 1,450,000 59,670 21.3 1.27 1,799.862 750,000 Maryland.... 12,300,000 608,910 20.2

8,342 24,000 Massachu's... 1,950,000 57,017 34.2

5,294,090 144,000 Michigan..... 14,100,000 437,889 28.9 74 1,641,897 650.000 Minnesota.... 5,750,000 197,591 29.1

199,314 820,000 Mississippi. 30,000,000 1,714,285 17.5 1.12 4,427 8.000 Missouri... 80,500,000 2,630, 718 30.6

60

259,633 300,000 Nebraska.... 6,750,000 159,952 42.2 37 24,312 9,000 N. Hampshire 1,400,000 46.666 30 1.30 2,323,092 106,000 New Jersey.. 9,200,000 298,701 30.8 951 182,172 26.000 New York.... 19,100,000 704,797 27.1 1.03 48,548,289 4,600,000 N. Carolina,.. 17,400,000 1,175,675 14.8 1.001 51,119 3,500 Ohio.......... 68,250,005 2,267,411 30.1

21,618,893 2,600,000 Oregon...... 200,000 5,714 35

80 105,379 200,000 Pennsylvania 29,500,000 939,490 81.4

2,508,5561 631,000 Rhode Island. 440,000 17,460 25.2

181,511 55,000 S. Carolina... 8,100,000 698.275 11.6 1.40 1,543 7.400 Tennessee.... 47.500,000 2,375,000 20

185,575 28,000 Texas ...... 23,000,000 793,103 29

275,123 60,000 Vermont.. 1,475,000 43,382 34

8,215,030 102.000 Virginia.... 17,500,000 1,129,032 16.5

280,852 28,000 W. Virginia 8,100,000 291.366 27.8 79 Inc. in Va. 62,000 Wisconsin,... 9,500,000 359,848 26.4

1,104,300 1,500,000 Mevada & Ter. 2,000,000 71,428 28 1.10 10,500,000 400,000

Total... ... 874,120,005) 37,903,245) 26.42 1 .92 114, 154,211 28,652,200

769 11.7 81.81 6,385,724 600,847

807 13 1.10 1,983,313 450,005 848,016 35.3

2,468.034 1,500.630 1,086 23

1,830,807 112,680 250 2

637,065 35,340 285 14 1.80 654.213 297,680 891 13.8

1.83

8,062,758 780,350 59,808 20.9

13,096,374 2,320,500 17.947 22.9 11. 8,242, 183

344,850 45,396 26.5

3,792,792 301.960 816 30.6

405,408 71.863 15,589 18.5

7,644,208 610,845

2,707,108 520.310 36,231 20.

1.14 2,704, 133 230,110 1,043 23

3,002,267 170,110 5,760 25

2,155,512 140,340 26,859 242

3,476,296 401,320 31,906 25.7

555, 250 93,479 727 11 1.40 5,065, 755 600, 708 12,987 23.1 1.12 6,246,871 790,112

298 30.2 171 850,000 3.925 27 1.05 2,367,034 203,890

1,083 21 1.00 1,944,441 99,450 190,871 24.1 99 14,355,403 2,450,600

205 17 1.00 6.517,284 601. 160 101,960 25.5 1.02 12,625,394 1,000,360 5,714 35

60 896,414 140,500 26,737 23.6 1.02 10.463,296 890.460 2,391 23 1.28 385,128 21,420

925) 8 1.90 4,572,060 349,890 1,707 16.4 1.12 6,795,337 709,360 2.255 26.6 1.04 2,650,781 2,540,300 4,473 22.8 1.34 2,823, 157 230,300 1,618 17.3

11.437.821 917,250 8,712 16.7 1.06 Inc. in Va. 57,915 25.9

3,746, 167 480,319 13,333 30

Not ret'd. 1,015,721 22.00 $1.08 (163,603,778 21,314,098

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POTATOES, BUTTER, HORSES, MULES, MILCI-COWS, SHEEP, AND SWINE.

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Alabama.... Arkansas.... California. Connecticut.. Delaware .. Florida.. Georgia. Tilinois.. Indiana, lowa...... Kansas ..... Kentucky... Logisiana.... Maine..., Maryland..... Massachusetts Michigan...... Minnesota, Mississippi.. Missouri. Nebraska. New Hampshire New Jersey. New York .... North Carolina... Ohio..... Oregon....... Pennsylvania.... Rhode Island. South Carolina.... Tennessee.. Texas... Vermont.. Virginia.. West Virginia Wisconsin. Nevada and Territories

812,000

346,000 2,400,000 2,500,000 200,000

80,000 218,000 7,500,000 4,750,000 4,500,000 1.500.000 2,100,000

850,000 7.500,000 1,050,000 4,300,000 7,500,000 3,000,000

400,000 2,000,000

550,000 4.500.000 5,300,000 28,500,000

675,000 9,600.000

500,000 15,400.000

770,000

117.000 1,000,000

400,000 5,750,000 1,188,000

850,000 4,800,000 1,500,000

4,952 5,552 19,200 23,148 2,857

400 4,065 72,815 44,811 36,585

123 10,067 149 30,434

8,888 58,593 123 14,383 73 40,566 106 48,387 26,785

4,494 89 17,891 115

3.928 140 80,000 150 56.989 250.000 114

9,121 85,714

3,846 130 150.980 102

7.857 98 1.950 20,000 50

3,571 | 112 85,937 116 23,760 10,365 44,859 15,000 100

6.028,478 165,063 140,687
4,067,556 199,600 79.800
3,095,035 300,611

7,620,912 40,150 110
651 1,430,502 23,160 4,112
1.70 '408,855 18,470 15,320
1.406,439, 765 108,300 200,150

28,052,551 1,340,220 99,450

18,306,651 890.310 85,340
51 11,953,666 199,580 6,244
46 1,093,497 85,301 1.990
53 11,716,609 650,811 140,910
75 1,444,742 98,320 97,450
52 11,687,781 71,110 168
64 5,265,295 99,112 11,310
68 8,297,936 49,450 189
37 15,503,482 201,340
72 2,957,673 45,780 578
1.095,006,610 117,870 121,960
47 12,704,837 520,640 81,450
401 601,541 19,356 1,372
6,956.764 45,101

40
62 10,714,447 85,460 6,960
51 103,097,280 703,120 1,960
80 4.735,495 169,308 59, 160
42 48,543,162 1,200,000 9.300
60 1,000.157 49.800 1,500

58,653.511 902,300 10,320

1,021,767 9,1201 20 1.83 3.177,934 98,125 65,300

73 10,017,787 300,975 131,780 1.60 5.850,583 600,250 93,800 38 15,900,859 71,8401 20 69 13,464,722 480,900 79,870 57 Included in Virginia..... 52 13,611,328 149,989 1,998 80 11,100,000

270.537 680,960 2,500,000

190,500 450,030 1.500.630 1,330,800 2,080,300 2,350,110

99,350 118,300 90,450 24,198 19,540 51.360 99,108 35,600 299,750 301,180 850,212 2,150,300 850.840 1,340,120 3,502,820 390,450 1,011.120 / 3,580, 120 201,740 1,001,180 1,001,200 41.810 31,820 161,310 280,191 1,001,861 2,690,870 148,320 450.300 940,110 190,1101 501,210 65,840 100,0301 160,211 393.120 160 220 119,560 98,540 198,580 1,340,820 640.960 60,740 27,890 150,880 300, 101 500,340 1,750,101 390,120 | 1,001,890 2,790,860 4,2071 7,209 6,917 99,540 620,890 79.680 149,450 140,160 800.540 1,980,300 3,750,960 4,960,300

301,102 780, 1901.898.900 960,322 4,580,650 8,880,300 79,312

112.700 873,212 1,960,340 1,748,340 23,180 31,320

21,960 171,480 270, 198 1,000,720 260,190 960,812 2.800,312 640.820 998,972 1.580.600 190,420 997, 990 81,450 401,860 | 1,340,250 1,900,300 250,312 790,458 / 865,998

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Total............ 133,886,000 1,222,200 | 99 72c. 470,536,468 10,101,032 1,509,419 (11,050,996 30,072,843 47.011.568

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MARKET PRICES OF FARM PRODUCTS FOR DECEMBER, 1870, AND JANUARY, 1871.

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MARKET PRICES OF FARM PRODUCTS FOR DECEMBER, 1870, AND JANUARY, 1871.

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Hay.......

.... per ton.. Pork-Mess....

per b51..
Lard-Tierce...

Key.....
Butter-Choice ..

Fair to medium.
Cheese-Factory.....
Cotton-Middling....
Tobacco-Sound lugs.....

Common leaf..

Medium leaf.....
Wool- Tub-washed :.....

Fleece-w'd (ac'd'y to grade).
Combing......
Pulled..

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Oats were also a smaller crop than in 1869, The market prices of farm produce differ of the aggregate yield being estimated at about course very greatly at different points in our 275,000,000 bushels. The quality was better widely-extended country, and it has seemed than the average.

to us that a record of the prices which were Potatos suffered to some extent from drought, current in December, 1870, and January, 1871, and from the depredations of the Colorado po- of the principal articles of the products of our tato-bug, “the ten-line spearman" as it is called. farms in New York, Chicago, Cincinnati, St. The product is believed to have been about Louis, New Orleans, and San Francisco, would 111,000,000 bushels-less by about one-fifth not only be interesting but instructive and than that of 1869.

profitable to our readers. They are compiled The Sweet Potatoe, on the contrary, was far very carefully (see tables on pages 6 and 7), more plentiful than usual in the States where and as near the first of each of these months it is grown. We have no means of estimating as practicable, from the prices-current of the the aggregate crop, but it was very large. respective cities.

The Hay crop was about fifteen per cent. be- It has been often urged that the “Plains," low that of 1869, probably not exceeding 22,- as the region extending from the eastern slope 000,000 tons. The quality was excellent. The of the Rocky Mountains to the central portions protracted dry weather of the early summer of Kansas, Nebraska, the Indian Territory, and caused the reduction in quantity.

Northern Texas, is now designated (the old Flax and Hemp were produced in rather name—the Great American Desert-having larger quantity than in 1869.

been proved a misnomer), could never become Fruit was generally much in excess of the an agricultural region from its constant liaprevious year. Grapes were very abundantbility to drought, and the supposed impossiand of excellent quality. Notwithstanding the bility of obtaining, without excessive cost, the great increase of wine production, the markets means of irrigating it. But in the spring of were for nearly two months glutted with the 1870 a colony was planted at Greeley, Colorado, fruit. Apples were very plentiful in the At- in the very heart of these “Plains," and very lantic and some of the Mississippi Valley States, little difficulty and but moderate expense were but deficient in quantity in the Northwest. found necessary to establish a permanent sysPears and Plums were more abundant than tem of irrigation, under the influence of which usual, especially on the Atlantic coast.

the soil has given evidence of almost miracuThe Tobacco crop was materially above the lous fertility. There are very few portions of average, and will probably aggregate not far this wide, arid tract, a region large enough to from 310,000,000 pounds.

cut up into a dozen large States, where irrigaSugar from the sugar-cane was a better crop tion is not possible, and at moderate cost. But than for several years past, the yield being recent experiments seem to indicate that the above 120,000 hogsheads of 1,000 pounds each. irrigation can be dispensed with. Mr. P. S. The Sorghum sugar and syrup were produced Elliott, of the Kansas Pacific Railway, durin larger quantity than in previous years. the year 1870, made several experiments,

The Cotton crop is probably the largest which were attended with triumphant sucsince 1859. Oareful estimates from full re- cess, in the cultivation of the unirrigated turns from all parts of the States in which it plains at Wilson, 236 miles west of the State is cultivated, up to December 1, 1870, give an line of Missouri, and 1,586 feet above the aggregate of 3,800,000 commercial bales, or level of the sea; at Ellis, 302 miles west of 1,767,000,000 pounds, being eighty-two per the State line, and 2,019 feet above the seacent. of the great crop of 1859. Of this level; and at Pond Creek, 422 miles west amount probably not more than 30,000 bales of the State line, and 3,175 feet above the sea. were Sea Island or long-staple cotton.

The last-named point is on the extreme western The following table gives a detailed esti- border of Kaasas, near the 102° of west lonmate of the number of acres in each of the gitude, four degrees west of the limit of arable cotton States devoted to that crop, the num- effort without irrigation, heretofore assigned ber of bales produced in each State (in round by eminent meteorologists. At these points numbers), the percentage of increase over the were sown wheat, rye, barley, timothy, lucern, crop of 1869, and the yield per acre:

alsike, clover, sanfoin, vetches, etc., and the seeds and nuts of the burr-oak, pecan, chestnut,

peach, and ailantus. All vegetated promptly, STATES. No. of Acres. No. of Bales.com. with

1869, p. ct.

and grew rapidly and successfully.

Relative to tree-growth on the plains, Mr. North Carolina... 451,714 170,000

175 South Caroliua... 601,764 220.000 124 170

Elliott lays down these propositions: 1. ForGeorgia....... 1,330,491 495.000 122 173 ests can be established in all parts of the plains, Florida...... 140.909 50,000

165

even without artificial irrigation. 2. Much Alabama 1,437.272 610,000

165 Mississippi...

1.644,512 725,000 110 205 deeper ploughing will be required than for Louisiana.. 920,700 495,000 115 250

winter grains or forage plants. 3. The most Texas.

900,937 465,000 182 240
Arkansas.....
711,734 875,000

124
215

rapid growers are the beech-trees for first Tennessee. 526,184 215.000

190 planting. 4. Planting seed is better than Other States... 218,823 80,900

170

transplanting young trees,

Product

1869.

Per acre

118

126

112

114

ALABAMA. This State seems to make good held in West Florida, on the question of anprogress toward regaining and surpassing that nexation, the vote had been favorable to the degree of material prosperity which she en annexation.” This message was referred to a joyed before the devastations occasioned by joint committee of the two Houses; but the the late civil war. An indication of this im- principal matter itself was not finally deterprovement may be seen in the fact that the mined upon at the last session. In the Senate, operations of that class of her citizens en- on February 21, 1870, a joint resolution was gaged in commerce appear to rest on a more adopted, to the effect that, as the Legislaturo solid foundation, and possess greater stability, of Florida had adjourned, the bill before the than in preceding years. The annual report Senate to provide for the annexation of West on the number and extent of the commercial Florida to this State be postponed till the failures for 1869, in Alabama, gave 16, with second Tuesday of the next General Assembly liabilities amounting in the aggregate to $101,- of this State." 000; whereas, in 1868, they had been 33, with Numerous lines of railway, intersecting the liabilities amounting to $594,000.

country in all directions, are in operation Among the cotton-growing States, Alabama already, and many others are in course of constands foremost, her soil being eminently well struction. adapted to the cultivation of that plant. Bo- By an act of 1867, State aid, in the shape sides, she possesses other natural resources in of endorsed bonds at the rate of $12,000 per exceeding great variety and abundance. With mile, was granted to railroads built within the a view to render these available, and make all limits of Alabama generally, provided the first branches of industry flourish within her limits, seventy miles were completed within three she invites immigration from the other States years, or by November 1, 1870. The amount and Europe, and causes the advantages of of bonds per mile has now been increased to settling upon her soil to be known abroad. $16,000, and in some of the roads to a larger

The State is about to enlarge her territory sum, for exceptional reasons. by the annexation of “West Florida." Under In connection with this act, a bill, commonthis name is meant "that portion of Florida ly. ly styled “The General Railroad Bill," was ing west of the Chattahoochee and Appalachi- introduced in the Senate at the session of 1870, cola Rivers, and west of a line running due north purporting “ to furnish the aid and credit of the from the mouth of the Appalachicola, bend- State of Alabama for the purpose of expediting ing west, so as to pass between the islands of the construction of railroads within the State." St. George and St. Vincent." This portion is The bill, after long discussion, passed the Sencomposed at present of eight counties in the ate on February 11th by a vote of 29 to 1; and State of Florida, named Calhoun, Escambia, on the 19th of that month the Lower House Franklin, Holmes, Jackson, Santa Rosa, Wal- also passed it with some amendments, which ton, and Washington. Commissioners appoint- the Senate concurred in on the same day. The ed for the purpose by the two States met and main provisions of this act are the following: agreed upon the section of territory to be “It extends the time, in which the endorseceded, as well as its price, and the other ment of the State may be obtained to railroad terms of the purchase, to take effect upon bonds, to November, 1871. The endorsement their agreement being duly sanctioned by is at the rate of $16,000 per mile. The road their respective States. The Legislature of applying for credit must be not less than Florida approved and confirmed the agreement thirty-five miles in length. Twenty miles of soon after it had been entered into, a joint the road must be completed and equipped out resolution for that purpose having been adopt of the fund of the company, not raised in aned by both Houses, and the act approved by ticipation of the endorsement. The road must the Governor on January 27, 1869. In the be first class-proven so upon inspection by a following June Governor Reed issued also a committee, comprising at least one civil enproclamation ordering an election to be held in gineer not connected with the road." This each of the above-mentioned counties, that matter was subsequently taken into further their respective citizens might express their consideration by the House on February 23d. sentiments in regard to the contemplated an- The special committee submitted a report and nexation, by voting “for” or “against" it. bill to explain and define the meaning and inThe election took place, and a large majority tent of the act to aid in the construction of of the votes cast was for annexation. Å railroads. (Endorses no bonds for roads less letter dated December 1, 1869, from Pensacola, than thirty miles in length.) This House bill Florida, says: “We have voted nearly two to also passed the Senate on the 25th. one in favor of the annexation of West Flori- A special bill, to issue $3,000,000 of State da to Alabama, and hope for its speedy con- bonds to aid in the construction of the Alasummation," At the last session of the Legis. bama and Chattanooga Railroad, was introlature of Alabaina a bill “to provide for the duced in the Senate early in the session, which annexation of West Florida " was introduced aroused great excitement within the legislativo in the Senate. By a message dated January halls as well as in a large portion of the press 19, 1870, Governor Smith informed that body and people outside. Among other grounds, of the fact that “at the election previously the opposition rested on the fact that this

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