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III.
Her bonie face it was as meek

As ony lamb upon a lee ;
The evening sun was ne'er sae sweet
As was the blink o' Phemie's e'e.

Blythe, 8c.

IV. The Highland hills I've wander'd wide,

And o'er the Lowlands I hae been; But Phemie was the blythest lass That ever trode the dewy green.

Blythe, 8c.

SONG XXIX. .

A ROSE-BUD BY MY EARLY WALK

AIR.-THE SHEPHERD'S WIFE,

I.
A ROSE-BUD by my early walk,
Adown a corn-inclosed bawk,
Sae gently bent its thorny stalk,

All on a dewy morning.

II. Ere twice the shades o' dawn are fled, In a' its crimson glory spread, And drooping rich the dewy head,

It scents the early morning.

III.
Within the bush, her covert nest
A little linnet fondly prest,
The dew sat chilly on her breast

Sae early in the morning.

IV. She soon shall see her tender brood, The pride, the pleasure o' the wood, Amang the fresh green leaves bedew'd,

Awak the early morning.

V.
So thou, dear bird, young Jeany fair,
On trembling string or vocal air,
Shall sweetly pay the tender care

That tents thy early morning.

VI. So thou, sweet rose-bud, young and gay Shalt beauteous blaze upon the day, And bless the parent's evening ray

That watch'd thy early morning *.

* Miss J. C. daughter of a friend of the Bard, is supposed to be the heroine of this song.

SONG XXX.

WHERE BRAVING ANGRY WINTER'S STORMS.

AIR.N. GOW'S LAMENTATION FOR ABERCAIRNY.

I.
WHERE braving angry winter's storms,

The lofty Ochels rise,
Far in their shade my Peggy's charms

First blest my wondering eyes.
As one who by some savage stream,

A lonely gem surveys,
Astonish'd doubly marks it beam

With art's most polish'd blaze.

II.
Blest be the wild, sequester'd shade,

And blest the day and hour,
Where Peggy's charms I first survey'd,

When first I felt their pow'r!

The tyrant death with grim controul

May seize my fleeting breath; But tearing Peggy from my

soul Must be a stronger death.

VOL. II.

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