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III. : I'll pu' the budding rose, when Phebus peeps in

view, For it's like a baumy kiss o' her sweet bonnie mou; The hyacinth's for constancy wi' it's unchanging

blue, And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May.

IV. The lilly it is pure, and the lilly it is fair, And in her lovely bosom I'll place the lilly there; The daisy's for simplicity and unaffected air,

And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May.

V. The hawthorn I will pu', wi' its locks o'siller grey, Where, like an aged man, it stands at break o' day, But the songster's nest within the bush I winna

tak away;

And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May.

VI. The woodbine I will pu' when the e'ening star is

near, And the diamond-draps o' dew shall be her e'en

sae clear;

The violet's for modesty which weel she fa's to wear,

And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May.

VII. I'll tie the posie round wi' the silken band o'luve, And I'll place it in her breast, and I'll swear by

a' above, That to my latest draught o' life the band shall

ne'er remove, And this will be a posie to my ain dear May.

SONG L.

YE BANKS AND BRAES, &c.

AIR.—THE CALEDONIAN HUNT'S DELIGHT.

I.

Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon,

How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair; How can ye chant, ye little birds,

And I sae weary, fu' o' care ! Thou 'll break my heart thou warbling bird,

That wantons thro' the flowering thorn : Thou minds me o' departed joys,

Departed never to return.

II.
Oft hae I rov'd by bonnie Doon,

To see the rose and woodbine twine ;
And ilka bird sang o' its luve,

And fondly sae did I o' mine.

Wi’ lightsome heart I pu'd a rose,

Fu' sweet upon its thorny tree; And my fause lover stole my rose,

But, ah! he left the thorn wi' me.

SONG - LI.

WILLIE WASTLE DWALT ON TWEED

AIR.JENNY'S BAWBEE.

I.
WILLIE Wastle dwalt on Tweed,

The spot they ca'd it Linkumdoddie, Willie was a wabster gude,

Cou'd stown a clue wi' ony body ; He had a wife was dour and din,

O Tinkler Madgie was her mither ;

Sic. a wife as Willie had,
I wad na gie a button for her.

II.
She has an e'e, she has but ane,

The cat has twa the very colour;
Five rusty teeth forbye a stump,

A clapper tongue wad deave a miller ;

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