The Life of John Marshall, Volumen4

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Cosimo, Inc., 2005 - 704 páginas
John Marshall (1755-1835) became the fourth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court despite having had almost no formal schooling and after having studied law for a mere six weeks. Nevertheless, Marshall remains the only judge in American history whose distinction derives almost entirely from his judicial career. During Marshall's nearly 35-year tenure as chief justice, he wielded the Constitution's awe-inspiring power aggressively and wisely, setting the Supreme Court on a course for the ages by ensuring its equal position in the triumvirate of the federal government of the United States and securing its role as interpreter and enforcer of the Constitution. Marshall's judicial energies were as unflagging as his vision was expansive. This four-volume life of Marshall received wide acclaim upon its initial publication in 1920, winning the Pulitzer Prize that year, and makes fascinating reading for the lawyer, historian, and legal scholar.
 

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Página 27 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation, amicably if they can, violently if they must.

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Born in 1862, Albert Jeremiah Beveridge was a well-respected lecturer and American historian. Admitted to the bar in 1887, he began his law practice in Indianapolis, Indiana. Beveridge was elected to the U.S. Senate as a Republican in 1899, where for 12 years he supported the progressive legislation sponsored by President Theodore Roosevelt. Upon his retirement from the Senate in 1912, he retreated from public life, devoting much of his time to his writings in American history.

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