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DENTS DUE TO FAULT OF EMPLOYER, OF WORKMAN, ETC., CLASSIFIED BY CAUSES 1907 AND 1897. I Beiheft, II Teil. Gewerbe-Unfallstatistik für das Jahr 1907, pp. 384, 385.)

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RESULT OF THE INJURIES.

Table 13 shows the result of the injury, or rather the condition of the injured person, expressed in terms of loss of earning power. To bring out the condition of the injured person in the years immediately following the granting of the pension the table shows what his loss of earning power is during the first, the second, the third, and the fourth year after the granting of the pension.

In the total for all industrial accident associations (not including institutes), 65,205 injured persons were given pensions for industrial accidents in 1904; during the year 1905, 7.63 per cent had died as the result of the accident, and in the year 1908 this proportion had increased to 8.06 per cent.

Of the 65,205 injured persons given pensions in 1904, 0.93 per cent were rated as sustaining total permanent disability in 1905, and in 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 0.81 per cent.

Of the 65,205 injured persons granted pensions in 1904, 44.27 per cent were rated as having sustained an injury causing partial permanent disability in 1905, and in 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 37.40 per cent. Of the pensioners composing this 37.40 per cent, 24.17 per cent had sustained a loss of earning power of under 25 per cent, 9.27 per cent had sustained a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 3.01 per cent a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 0.95 per cent a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent; in each case there is a decrease in the proportion of those sustaining the various degrees of loss of earning power during the four years 1905 to 1908.

Of the 65,205 injured persons who were granted pensions in 1904, 47.17 per cent were rated in 1905 as having sustained temporary disability, and in 1908 this proportion had been increased to 53.73 per cent; in 1905, 22.59 per cent were no longer disabled and in 1908 44.37 per cent were no longer disabled; in 1905, 19.67 per cent had sustained a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent and in 1908, 8.15 per cent had sustained this loss of earning power; in 1905, 3.93 per cent were rated as having sustained a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, and in 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 0.98 per cent; in 1905, 0.50 per cent were rated as having sustained a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and in 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 0.12 per cent; in 1905, 0.48 per cent were rated as having sustained a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent, and in 1908 this had been reduced to 0.11 per cent. Approximately 44 per cent of the persons granted pensions in 1904 had therefore entirely recovered at the end of the year 1908.

A comparison of the improvement in the character of the disability sustained by the pensioners of 1896 with the pensioners of 1904 shows a marked decrease in the proportion of deaths, of total permanent disablements, and of partial permanent disablements; the proportion of those entirely recovering their earning power in the second of these two periods is much greater than was the case in the first. Part of this improvement just mentioned is of course due to the inclusion of a larger number of temporary disablements among those granted compensation in the later of the two periods; part of it must also be regarded as due to the elaborate medical and other treatment provided by the accident associations in their effort to restore the earning power of those injured by accident in the course of their employment.

Taking up first the accidents resulting in death, the marine-navigation industry (association 63) had 418 persons granted pensions in 1904; of this number 22.49 per cent died in the course of the year 1905, and there were no additional deaths during the following three years. The fatal-accident rate of this association is similar to that of the inland navigation associations (60–62), which, in 1904, had 756 persons granted pensions; of this number 21.30 per cent died during the course of the year 1905, and this proportion had increased to 22.35 per cent in the year 1908. The industry group private railways (association 56) had 135 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 18.52 per cent died in the course of the year 1905, and during the period 1905 to 1908 increased to 20 per cent. The chimney-sweeping industry (association 42) had 29 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 13.79 per cent died in the course of the year 1905, and there were no additional deaths during the period. The industry of livery, drayage, cartage, etc. (association 59), had 1,835 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 12.15 per cent died in the course of the year 1905 and 12.59 per cent in the course of the four-year period ending with 1908. The five industry groups mentioned had the highest fatal-accident rates of those included in the table.

Taking up the cases of total permanent disability the industry group with the highest rate is that of chimney sweeping (association 42). In 1904 this industry had 29 persons granted pensions on account of industrial accidents, and of this number 3.45 per cent were rated as having sustained total permanent disability in 1905; in 1908 this proportion had been increased to 6.90 per cent. The industry group with the second highest proportion of total permanent disablement is that of street and small railways (association 57); this group had 406 persons granted pensions in the year 1904, and of this number 4.68 per cent had sustained injuries causing total permanent disability, and during the period this proportion had been reduced to 4.44 per cent. The industry group with the third highest proportion

of total permanent disablement is that of private railways (association 56), which had 135 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 2.22 per cent were rated as having sustained total permanent disability in 1905, and this proportion had increased during the period to 4.44 per cent. The industry group with the fourth highest proportion of total permanent disablement is that of pottery (association 16) which had 272 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 1.47 per cent were rated as having sustained total permanent disability in the year 1905, and in the year 1908 this proportion had increased to 1.84 per cent. The industry group with the fifth highest proportion of total permanent disablement is that of engineering, excavating, etc. (association 64), which had 2,001 persons granted pensions in the year 1904; of this number 1.30 per cent were rated as having sustained total permanent disablement in the year 1905, and in 1908 this proportion had been increased to 1.55.

The industry group with the highest proportion of partial permanent disablement is that of metal working (associations 12, 13), which in 1904 had 1,116 persons granted pensions; of this number 79.30 per cent were rated in 1905 as having sustained partial permanent disability, and in the year 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 69.44 per cent. This 69.44 per cent was composed of 57.70 per cent who had sustained a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent, 9.05 per cent with a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 2.15 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 0.54 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. The industry group with the second highest proportion of partial permanent disablement is that of paper products (association 29), which in 1904 had 398 persons granted pensions; of this number 54.27 per cent were rated as having sustained partial permanent disablement in the year 1905, and this proportion increased in the years 1906 and 1907, but in the year 1908 was also 54.27 per cent; this 54.27 per cent was composed of 40.20 per cent who had sustained a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent, 9.80 per cent with 25 to 50 per cent loss of earning power, 3.01 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 1.26 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. The industry group with the third highest proportion of partial permanent disablement is that of clothing (association 41), which in 1904 had 640 persons granted pensions; of this number 72.97 per cent were rated in the year 1905 as having sustained partial disablement, and in the year 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 54.22 per cent; this 54.22 per cent is composed of 35.47 per cent who had sustained a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent, 11.09 per cent with a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 5.16 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 2.50 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. The industry group with the fourth highest proportion of partial permanent disablement is that of linen (association 20), which in 1904 had 242 persons granted pensions; of this number 49.17 per cent were rated in 1905 as having sustained partial permanent disablement, and in 1908 this proportion had been increased to 54.13 per cent; this 54.13 per cent was composed of 33.88 per cent with a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent, 13.22 per cent with a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 6.20 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 0.83 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. The industry group with the fifth highest proportion of partial permanent disablement is that of leather (association 30) which in 1904 had 455 persons granted pensions; of this number 65.28 per cent were rated in 1905 as having sustained partial permanent disablement, and in 1908 this proportion had been reduced to 52.75 per cent; this 52.75 per cent was composed of 32.75 per cent who had sustained a loss of earning power of less than 25 per cent, 13.63 per cent with a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 4.83 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 1.54 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. This industry group of leather shows a marked decrease in the proportion of those rated as having sustained a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent in the four years included in the table.

The industry group with the highest proportion of those sustaining temporary disablement is that of blacksmithing, etc. (association 66), which in 1904 had 1,283 persons granted pensions; of this number 81.84 per cent were rated as having sustained temporary disability in 1905, and in 1908 this percentage had been changed to 79.27 per cent; this 79.27 per cent, however, is composed of 63.68 per cent who had sustained no loss of earning power (in other words, who had entirely recovered during the following year) together with 14.19 per cent with a loss of earning power of under 25 per cent, 1.09 per cent with a loss of earning power of 25 to 50 per cent, 0.08 per cent with a loss of earning power of 50 to 75 per cent, and 0.23 per cent with a loss of earning power of 75 to 100 per cent. The four other groups with the highest proportions of temporary disablements are those of meat products (association 65), brick and tile making (association 17), livery, drayage, cartage, etc. (association 59), and silk (association 27). In each of these groups practically the same distribution of disabilities is found; there is a high proportion of persons sustaining no loss of earning power (that is, who have entirely recovered) at the end of the fifth year, and of those who have sustained the various degrees of loss of earning power the greatest number are contained in the group of slight disabilities.

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