The Fragmentation of the Proper Name and the Crisis of Degree: Deconstructing King Lear

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LIT Verlag Münster, 2004 - 132 páginas

This is a rich interpretation of a rich text. Ben Amara provides a twenty-first century reading of a timeless masterpiece, and in so doing he can point to the relationship of death and desire as playing both with body and language. He delights in confronting his readers with the ineluctable patterns which language and time inscribe within the open/closed Shakespearean space: Degree, division, and diversity as the focal points. Emphasis upon the corporeality of the human body concatenates this study's textual interpretation with the corpus of the literary canon, itself seen as a body divided by performance and differed by reading. It is also true that [this] prevails over the damaging engagement with the deconstructed text and dominates the conflictual tendencies of the reconstructed drama."--Christopher Mulvery, King Alfred's College, Wincester, England

Radhouan Ben Amara has a Ph.D. in comparative literature from Washington University in the United States. He is professor of French at the University of Cagliari in Italy and also teaches English and English literature at Martini's High Institute in Cagliari.

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Contenido

III
5
V
35
VII
109
VIII
115
IX
131
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Página 33 - O good old man ; how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed...
Página 9 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Página 47 - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate. The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting ? And for that riches where is my deserving ? The cause of this fair gift in me is wanting, And so my patent back again is swerving.
Página 10 - Lear. Meantime we shall express our darker purpose. — Give me the map there. — Know that we have divided In three our kingdom : and 'tis our fast intent To shake all cares and business from our age ; Conferring them on younger strengths, while we Unburden'd crawl toward death. — Our son of Cornwall, And you, our no less loving son of Albany, We have this hour a constant will to publish Our daughters' several dowers, that future strife May be prevented now.
Página 85 - Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Página 110 - Neither let it be deemed too saucy a comparison to balance the highest point of man's wit with the efficacy of Nature; but rather give right honour to the heavenly Maker of that maker, who having made man to His own likeness, set him beyond and over all the works of that second nature: which in nothing he showeth so much as in Poetry, when with the force of a divine breath he bringeth things forth far surpassing her doings...
Página 24 - Is man no more than this? Consider him well. Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume. Ha! here's three on's are sophisticated! Thou art the thing itself; unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art.
Página 24 - When the mind's free, The body's delicate ; the tempest in my mind Doth from my senses take all feeling else Save what beats there.
Página 7 - tis fittest. Cor. How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? Lear. You do me wrong, to take me out o' the grave. — Thou art a soul in bliss ; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
Página 36 - Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead : Force should be right ; or rather, right and wrong — Between whose endless jar justice resides — Should lose their names, and so should justice too. Then...

Acerca del autor (2004)

Radhouan Ben Amara is professor of French at the University of Cagliari in Italy. He also teaches English and English literature at Martini's High Institute in Cagliari.

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