The Philosophy of Unbelief in Morals and Religion: As Discoverable in the Faith and Character of Men

Portada
Robert Carter & Brothers, 1850 - 286 páginas

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 195 - Who humbleth himself to behold the things that are in heaven, and in the earth...
Página 264 - I will instruct thee and teach thee in the way which thou shalt go: I will guide thee with mine eye.
Página 88 - And he would not for a while : but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man ; yet, because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.
Página 92 - Whereupon as I went to Damascus with authority and commission from the chief priests, at midday, O king, I saw in the way a light from heaven, above the brightness of the sun, shining round about me and them which journeyed with me.
Página 76 - But, alas, so perverted is the soul of man, that he would rather spend his money for that which is not bread, and his labour for that which satisfieth not, than receive the salvation of GOD without money and without price.
Página 167 - Howe'er disguised in its own majesty, Is littleness; that he, who feels contempt For any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used; that thought with him Is in its infancy. The man, whose eye Is ever on himself, doth look on one, The least of nature's works, one who might move The wise man to that scorn which wisdom holds Unlawful, ever.
Página 65 - And Hazael said. But what, is thy servant a dog, that he should do this great thing?
Página 167 - ... any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used ; that thought with him Is in its infancy. The man, whose eye Is ever on himself, doth look on one, The least of nature's works, one who might move The wise man to that scorn which wisdom holds Unlawful, ever. O, be wiser thou ! Instructed that true knowledge leads to love, True dignity abides with him alone Who, in the silent hour of inward thought, Can still suspect, and still revere himself, In lowliness of heart.
Página 242 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Página 243 - And he said. Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father.

Información bibliográfica